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NEWS
April 17, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration obtained advance support of American Jewish leaders before imposing new rules that had the effect of diverting most Soviet Jewish emigres from the United States to Israel, according to informed sources. Administration officials and Jewish leaders both said that the consultations defused what could have turned into a firestorm of controversy.
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NEWS
December 16, 1991 | RUSSELL CHANDLER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
It all began three years ago in a makeshift church in the back yard of Vladimir and Nadezhda Kuzmenko, who had just moved to this Central Valley city with their eight young children. The congregation of 35 quickly outgrew the Kuzmenkos' covered patio, then relocated to a rented building that held 180. Soon, the faithful--all Pentecostal Christians from the Soviet Union--were praying for an even larger space. "People were spilling over to the stairs and sidewalk," said the Rev.
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NEWS
January 18, 1990 | ESTHER SCHRADER and MASHA HAMILTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Alexander Gulanerian heard the mob pounding down the hall seconds before his door was broken down and they stormed in, brandishing knives, broken bottles and lengths of pipe. Gulanerian, an Armenian living in Baku, the capital of Azerbaijan, said the intruders, without uttering a word, began beating him. They slashed his neck and his feet and threw him out of a second-story window.
NEWS
August 21, 1991 | MATHIS CHAZANOV, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southern California emigres from the Soviet Union, China and Eastern Europe, each with his own political agenda, have begun to work on a common goal, protesting the emergency government in Moscow. Only a few days ago, the prospect of a demonstration in support of ousted Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev would have been highly unlikely, organizers said.
NEWS
December 16, 1991 | RUSSELL CHANDLER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
It all began three years ago in a makeshift church in the back yard of Vladimir and Nadezhda Kuzmenko, who had just moved to this Central Valley city with their eight young children. The congregation of 35 quickly outgrew the Kuzmenkos' covered patio, then relocated to a rented building that held 180. Soon, the faithful--all Pentecostal Christians from the Soviet Union--were praying for an even larger space. "People were spilling over to the stairs and sidewalk," said the Rev.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1988 | ESTHER SCHRADER, Times Staff Writer
State Department officials have cautioned service agencies that 3,400 Soviet Armenian immigrants expected to settle in Los Angeles between now and October may find it more difficult to gain refugee status than previous immigrants and will receive less government assistance when they arrive.
NEWS
January 13, 1989 | DAVID REYES, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan's decision to increase quotas for Soviet emigres by cutting those for Southeast Asians has left many in Orange County's Vietnamese community feeling shocked, disappointed and abandoned. "As Vietnamese, we have strongly supported President Reagan because of his stand against communism. But his decision was a political one and this issue is a human one," said Ky Ngo, who came to the United States in 1975 and whose greatest concern has been the family he left in Vietnam.
NEWS
February 19, 1989 | MATHIS CHAZANOV and ESTHER SCHRADER, Times Staff Writers
Refugee resettlement efforts in Southern California are about to be overwhelmed by thousands of Jews and Armenians who are backed up in Italy and the Soviet Union waiting for permission to enter the United States. "There is just not enough money and services to serve these people in an expeditious way," said Bruce Whipple, director of the Los Angeles office of the nonprofit International Rescue Committee, which helps find jobs, housing and language training for refugees.
NEWS
December 4, 1988 | Associated Press
Kremlin officials beefed up security at airports and power plants in the republics of Azerbaijan and Armenia on Saturday and scrambled to aid an estimated 150,000 refugees who have fled their homes in fear of ethnic violence, Soviet media reported. The Moscow leadership also ripped into the Communist Party and government leaders of the rival republics for failing to halt the wave of communal rioting that has killed at least 28 people.
NEWS
December 1, 1988
Hundreds of Soviet Jews awaiting refugee visas in Italy pleaded with the United States to allow them to immigrate, prompting a U.S. official to suggest they could enter the country as "parolees" instead. Verne Jervis, a spokesman for the Immigration and Naturalization Service, said a parolee is "somebody who is allowed to come in . . . at the discretion of the attorney general."
NEWS
August 29, 1990 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Driven by dreams of a better life overseas and fears of impending collapse at home, more than 1 million Soviet citizens have applied to immigrate to America as refugees, a wish that U.S. officials say only a fraction of them will be granted. "We simply haven't been able to keep up with the backlog of applications," Bob Cole, project director at a Rosslyn, Va., processing center where the Soviets' applications are opened and given a first screening, said Tuesday.
NEWS
April 17, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration obtained advance support of American Jewish leaders before imposing new rules that had the effect of diverting most Soviet Jewish emigres from the United States to Israel, according to informed sources. Administration officials and Jewish leaders both said that the consultations defused what could have turned into a firestorm of controversy.
NEWS
April 9, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ina Sheincvit, a new immigrant from the Soviet Union, was approached by a man wearing black who offered her work, an apartment and an invitation to Passover dinner. The offers were all welcome, although the man's insistence on vaguely familiar religious customs--he suggested that Sheincvit wear long sleeves and cover her hair--were not to her liking. "He reminded me of my grandfather.
NEWS
January 25, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet troops, afraid that Azerbaijani militants would soon begin attacking Russian families in Baku, used artillery, tank and naval gunfire Wednesday evening to break a blockade of Baku's port so that ships carrying refugees, many of them Russians, can leave. A number of ships used by Azerbaijani militants to blockade the port for the past three days were sunk, according to reports from Baku, while others were observed on fire in Baku Bay.
NEWS
January 19, 1990 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Administrator Gene McNary of the Immigration and Naturalization Service said Thursday that he expects more Armenians to seek refugee status in the United States, but he doubts that many could qualify by proving they were fleeing political persecution. "Armenians have been coming saying they're looking for a better way of life," he said, noting long lines of people at the U.S. Embassy in Moscow. "But they haven't said the magic words or made the case."
NEWS
January 18, 1990 | ESTHER SCHRADER and MASHA HAMILTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Alexander Gulanerian heard the mob pounding down the hall seconds before his door was broken down and they stormed in, brandishing knives, broken bottles and lengths of pipe. Gulanerian, an Armenian living in Baku, the capital of Azerbaijan, said the intruders, without uttering a word, began beating him. They slashed his neck and his feet and threw him out of a second-story window.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1989 | SAM ENRIQUEZ, Times Staff Writer
Representatives of agencies that help Soviet refugees learn English and find jobs said Friday that they are bracing for a dramatic increase in the number of new immigrants moving to Los Angeles County in the next year as a result of the Soviet Union's perestroika policy.
NEWS
September 6, 1989
The Bush Administration is considering a six-month waiting period for prospective Soviet Jewish emigres who do not have close relatives in the United States, a U.S. official said. Also under consideration is processing the refugees in Moscow, with the addition of dozens of U.S. workers to handle the load, and phasing out the offices in Vienna through which many of the refugees now pass, he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1989 | LYNN STEINBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eugene and Sophia Belenky navigated the produce aisle of the supermarket with care, walking slowly, letting their eyes rest on each bin of fruit and vegetables. Automatic sprinklers released a light mist that made the green peppers look especially crisp, the tomatoes fresh and succulent. The Belenkys--among 840 Soviet Jewish refugees who have immigrated to Los Angeles in recent months--marveled at the abundance of goods from which they could choose. There were four varieties of lettuce alone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1989 | LISA MASCARO
When Moscow-born Boris Gurevich takes a shower, he still remembers that in the Soviet Union, there was no hot water. But it has been easier to adjust to having hot water, says the former refusenik who emigrated to the United States in 1980, than to having the freedom to live a Jewish life style.
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