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Refugees Vietnam

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1989 | DAVID REYES, Times Staff Writer
A physician with ties to pro-Hanoi government organizations accused the FBI this week of failing to adequately protect Vietnamese refugees whose political views often expose them to threats and violence. Dr. Jack R. Kent, a Los Angeles endocrinologist and longtime activist in the Orange County Vietnamese community, said that as a consequence, many formerly outspoken Vietnamese have been threatened by or have fallen prey to right-wing "hit squads."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 2005 | Mai Tran, Times Staff Writer
When the first evacuees from Hurricane Katrina arrived at the Hong Kong City Mall, Ha Duong, the mall's owner, initially thought they were loiterers. About 10 Vietnamese families -- old people, young people, children -- were wandering in the main corridor of the shopping center that has long served as the hub of Houston's Vietnamese American community. All day, they kept pacing, seemingly aimless, outside the stores. It was the afternoon of Aug. 29, the day Katrina came ashore.
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NEWS
August 30, 1989
Thai pirates slaughtered about 150 Vietnamese refugees in an attack in the Gulf of Thailand two months ago, the sole survivor and Thai police said. The survivor, a teen-age girl, said the refugees left Vietnam on June 15 in a boat headed for Malaysia. Two days later, they were attacked by two Thai fishing boats. Fishermen armed with knives boarded the boat, robbed passengers and abducted 13 women and a boy. They then rammed the refugees' boat and sank it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 2001 | MAI TRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Nhu-Ngoc Ong, an aspiring social scientist, the trip back to Vietnam was the first step toward achieving her goal of becoming an expert on issues in her native land. The 24-year-old UC Irvine graduate student spent a month in Hanoi, the nation's capital, training researchers for a groundbreaking public survey of political and social attitudes in the country that Ong left a decade earlier to emigrate to California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 1990 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Black ink slashes white silk, and a lost world emerges. A water buffalo dips one curved horn into a rice paddy. An ancient woman clutches a bowl. A mother comforts her child, touching her cheek to his smaller one in a gesture of infinite tenderness. These spare brush strokes made Be Ky a celebrity in the Saigon art world at the age of 18. A year ago, at the age of 51, she and her husband, Ho Thanh Duc, a renowned collagist, left Vietnam, settling recently in Garden Grove.
NEWS
April 24, 2000 | SCOTT GOLD and MAI TRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
On a ragged dock in the Mississippi Delta, 50-year-old Rick Cao darns the nets of the Miss My Phuong, using both hands and a big toe to sort through a bird's nest of nylon. Soon, he'll shove off again to mine the Gulf of Mexico for shrimp, and he might go weeks without hearing a word of English on his marine radio. The Vietnamese, he explains, "are taking over the gulf." At an office park outside San Jose, 42-year-old Thinh Nguyen folds himself into his Acura after another 15-hour day.
NEWS
April 15, 1991 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK and LILY DIZON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In retrospect, it seems the three Nguyen brothers led dual lives. In keeping with Vietnamese tradition, they were well-behaved boys at home who bowed their heads to their parents, according to their father, Bim Khac Nguyen. Loi, 21, Pham, 19, and Long, 17, always listened to him, he recalled sadly. Away from home, however, some saw them as troubled young men. Immigrants from Vietnam, they had difficulty adapting in American society and all had problems in school.
NEWS
July 23, 1990 | ROBERT W. STEWART and MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Two Orange County congressmen are moving to stave off the collapse of a fragile international agreement governing the fate of tens of thousands of Vietnamese boat people, but they are attacking the problem from nearly opposite perspectives. "It's good cop, bad cop," said Rep. Robert K. Dornan (R-Garden Grove), who represents more Vietnamese-Americans than any other member of Congress.
NEWS
January 12, 1989 | Associated Press
President Reagan, acting to ease the backlog of Soviet refugees, has decided to increase this year's Soviet quota by 5,500 to a total of 30,000 who will be permitted to enter the United States, a senior U.S. official said Wednesday night. The slots will be taken from the 25,000 ceiling set for refugees from Vietnam. But, the official said, the United States has considerable flexibility to alter the totals later on.
NEWS
August 17, 1987 | DAVID HOLLEY, Times Staff Writer
Authorities here have issued orders to four southern provinces that ethnic Chinese refugees from Vietnam who have been resettled in that part of China be stopped from sailing to Hong Kong, the official New China News Agency reported Sunday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 2000 | MAI TRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They escaped Vietnam as boys after Saigon fell to the advancing North Vietnamese army in 1975. Separately, the three refugees came to North America, where they would flourish and graduate from elite universities. Today, this trio of activist attorneys donate their spare time as advisors, educators and mediators, moving and shaking Orange County's Vietnamese immigrant community into mainstream America.
NEWS
April 24, 2000 | SCOTT GOLD and MAI TRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
On a ragged dock in the Mississippi Delta, 50-year-old Rick Cao darns the nets of the Miss My Phuong, using both hands and a big toe to sort through a bird's nest of nylon. Soon, he'll shove off again to mine the Gulf of Mexico for shrimp, and he might go weeks without hearing a word of English on his marine radio. The Vietnamese, he explains, "are taking over the gulf." At an office park outside San Jose, 42-year-old Thinh Nguyen folds himself into his Acura after another 15-hour day.
NEWS
June 4, 1998 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The saga of the Vietnamese boat people, one of the most tragic examples of human suffering in the region's recent history, has finally come to an end. --U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees, Hanoi, August 1997 * "It's over?" Nguyen Van Y asked, incredulous. "Then what am I doing still here? When the French ship picked us up, we thought three, maybe six months in the Philippines, then the United States. That was nine years ago." The noodle shop on Rizal Avenue was crowded, and "Mr.
NEWS
May 29, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Ninety-three Vietnamese boat people arrived in Hanoi on the last United Nations chartered repatriation flight there from Hong Kong. They were part of the last major voluntary repatriation organized by the Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees. An additional 152 people were flown to Ho Chi Minh City, formerly Saigon. The refugees' saga began during the 1970s in the aftermath of the Vietnam War as thousands sought to flee the country following the Communists' victory over U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1996 | THAO HUA
Southland aikido masters are putting their kicks and punches together this weekend in a fund-raiser to help thousands of Vietnamese living in refugee camps in the Philippines and others, organizers said. The seminar features six Southern California masters of aikido. One of those teachers lived in a refugee camp himself for nine months before arriving in Southern California. The two sessions, costing $35 for one session and $60 for both, will be from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. today and 9:30 a.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 1996 | RENEE TAWA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hai Le remembers what it was like to live in a cramped, rickety shack that collapsed with each tropical storm at his refugee camp in Malaysia--and to feel forgotten by the world. On Sunday, Le, now a 30-year-old Anaheim resident, was among about 5,000 people who turned out for a walk-a-thon at Mile Square Regional Park to raise money for Vietnamese refugees at detention centers in the Philippines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 2000 | MAI TRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They escaped Vietnam as boys after Saigon fell to the advancing North Vietnamese army in 1975. Separately, the three refugees came to North America, where they would flourish and graduate from elite universities. Today, this trio of activist attorneys donate their spare time as advisors, educators and mediators, moving and shaking Orange County's Vietnamese immigrant community into mainstream America.
NEWS
December 14, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Thousands of Vietnamese "boat people" demonstrated Wednesday against the forced repatriation of 51 other refugees to Vietnam, but the Hong Kong government pledged to continue sending the unwanted immigrants home. No violence was reported in the demonstrations in three refugee holding centers, a government spokeswoman said. She said 3,000 refugees in each of two camps and about 300 in a third holding center staged protests.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 1996 | BINH HA HONG
The biggest names in Vietnamese entertainment will headline a concert to raise funds for the upkeep of refugee camps in the Philippines. Friday's "Vietnamese Concerts for Refugees" at Irvine Meadows Amphitheatre will include about 200 singers, composers and dancers. They will perform folk dances, and traditional and modern songs. The concert is in response to the decision by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees to discontinue funding of detention centers throughout Southeast Asia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1996 | BINH HA HONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After three weeks in the United States, secure in a relative's comfortable home, To Cam Thi Tran still is jolted awake each night by memories of the past seven years, spent behind barbed wire in Malaysia.
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