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Refugees Yugoslavia

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NEWS
May 6, 1999 | T. CHRISTIAN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a surprise move, Macedonian officials abruptly shut the border to newly arriving refugees from Yugoslavia late Wednesday, demanding that other nations do more to pay for the Balkan crisis. Interior Ministry officials said that, from now on, they will allow into Macedonia each day only as many Kosovo Albanian refugees as are evacuated out of their country to other nations. U.N. officials were stunned by the closure, which they said forced at least 1,000 refugees back into Yugoslavia. One U.N.
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NEWS
February 23, 2000 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
NATO has put Serbs on notice in the northern part of this divided city that more than 1,500 ethnic Albanians who fled, or were forced out, during recent clashes will be coming home soon. If the return operation goes ahead as planned, tensions here are likely to rise again, because Serbs in northern Kosovska Mitrovica complain that NATO-led peacekeepers are doing too little to protect them while meeting the demands of the town's ethnic Albanian majority.
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NEWS
April 9, 1999 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like hundreds of thousands of his fellow Kosovo Albanians, Bashkim Millaku was forced at gunpoint to leave his home and his country by Serbian troops last week. On his way, the 36-year-old father of two was caught in a roundup of 400 men, held prisoner for three days and two nights, tormented mentally and physically, robbed and denied food and water. He was used as a human shield. By the time Millaku reached Albania on Saturday night, he was in shock.
NEWS
November 30, 1999 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
High on a breathtaking hill in southern Serbia, beyond the reach of foreign troops patrolling nearby Kosovo, the only sound in this ethnic Albanian village is of dried corn stalks rustling in the autumn breeze. Ethnic Albanians tilled this land for centuries before the Serbs gave up control of the neighboring province to NATO-led peacekeeping troops 5 1/2 months ago.
NEWS
April 14, 1999 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a significant escalation of tensions between the two Balkan neighbors, Albania on Tuesday charged that Yugoslav troops had violated its territory, shelling and burning homes in a remote border village before withdrawing. Yugoslav officials denied the report, but international peace monitors in the border area said Yugoslav troops had entered the village of Kamenica and set part of it on fire before withdrawing after 1 1/2 hours.
NEWS
April 5, 1999 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Drita Ismaili was damp, cold and exhausted Sunday from spending four nights in a muddy valley with tens of thousands of other refugees after being driven by Serbian forces from her home in Pristina, the capital of Kosovo. But when asked whether she thought she would return someday, Ismaili's eyes widened and she spoke with a voice full of certainty: "I will be on the first bus back to Kosovo."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1993 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For about a year now, the Primer family has been riveted to the television. Death counts from their disintegrating homeland of Bosnia drone on inside their Mission Viejo apartment. They flip on the electronic images of destruction upon awakening each morning and shut off the talking heads just before going to bed. Even their 2-year-old daughter Andrea's bright blue eyes recognize the ever-present CNN Headline News on the screen.
NEWS
July 9, 1999 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When they boarded the Fati Tours bus from Slovenia to Kosovo last July, Baljaj Naim, Zogaj Enver and Hrecaj Haljit were much like the 51 other ethnic Albanian passengers. Like the others, the three men were contract workers going home--their pockets full of hard-earned construction wages--to wives, children and parents they hadn't seen for months.
NEWS
May 24, 1999 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS and JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
More than 500 exhausted, emaciated Kosovo men of fighting age staggered across the border into Albania on Sunday, telling harrowing tales of being beaten, starved and forced to fight one another like gladiators before their Serbian captors.
NEWS
May 17, 1999 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Something strange is going on in this Kosovo Albanian village in what was once a hard-line guerrilla stronghold, where NATO accuses Serbs of committing genocide. An estimated 15,000 displaced ethnic Albanians live in and around Svetlje, in northern Kosovo, and hundreds of young men are everywhere, strolling along the dirt roads or lying on the grass on a spring day.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1999 | MATTHEW EBNET, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The man and woman, 6,612 miles from home, sit like statues now, with soft eyes and hard faces, with no place to go and nothing to do but pray and wait for the unknown to take shape. It's been that way for three months now, since they ran from a little village of box houses and cows and war in Kosovo and landed in Orange County unsure what day it was, or where they were. Someday it won't be like that anymore, they pray, but neither can fathom how.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1999 | KARIMA A. HAYNES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During the height of the war in Kosovo, Hazir Vlashi was forced to make a life-changing decision. Vlashi and his family are ethnic Albanians. They were being pushed from their hometown in southern Kosovo by Serb police and military troops at the outbreak of the NATO air war against Yugoslavia. Vlashi was faced with keeping his wife and four children in the small, war-torn border town or sending them to live with relatives in Los Angeles under a NATO resettlement program.
NEWS
August 4, 1999 | From a Times staff writer
The Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees said Tuesday that a customs duty imposed by the government of Macedonia is blocking aid to Kosovo and that supplies are not reaching people badly needing help. "The fee, which was announced in mid-July by the [Macedonian] government, has brought UNHCR's aid pipeline to a standstill and is contributing to a backup of supplies," a U.N. spokesman said.
NEWS
July 31, 1999 | SCOTT GLOVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The last time the parents saw their towheaded toddler, his 22-year-old mother smothered his pale, limp form with kisses and left him, apparently dead, near a decapitated body in the woods. The next time, after months of deprivation and anguish, they said he uttered a single word that made everything right: "Bab," Albanian for "Dad."
NEWS
July 28, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
The first Kosovo Albanian refugees returning home from the United States received joyful welcomes Tuesday from loved ones they thought they might never again see. There were embraces and tears, and shouts to friends and neighbors along the bustling streets. "This is the greatest day of all time," said Eshref Latifi, who returned home after almost four months. "We had doubts about ever being together again, but hope kept us alive."
NEWS
July 24, 1999 | VALERIE REITMAN and JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Like most refugees who fled this war-ravaged city to Albania or Macedonia, Naser Mehmetaj returned to find that his once-handsome two-story house had been torched by Yugoslav forces. Only the orange brick walls remained. So Mehmetaj pitched a donated tent beside his house. He is camping out with his wife, 70-year-old mother and five children.
NEWS
April 5, 1999 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Clearing skies over Belgrade allowed NATO to strike Yugoslavia's 1st Army headquarters, an ammunition plant and other targets Sunday, as the Pentagon announced plans to deploy Apache attack helicopters and ground-based missiles for the first time in the Kosovo theater. Allied aircraft delivered strikes around the capital of Yugoslavia on Easter morning, and after nightfall to Pristina, the capital of Kosovo.
NEWS
August 4, 1999 | From a Times staff writer
The Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees said Tuesday that a customs duty imposed by the government of Macedonia is blocking aid to Kosovo and that supplies are not reaching people badly needing help. "The fee, which was announced in mid-July by the [Macedonian] government, has brought UNHCR's aid pipeline to a standstill and is contributing to a backup of supplies," a U.N. spokesman said.
NEWS
July 19, 1999 | Associated Press
More than 1,000 of about 15,000 Kosovo refugees taken in by Germany have returned home, with more volunteering to return soon, the Interior Ministry said Sunday. Two flights carrying a total of 220 refugees are due to leave the northwestern town of Muenster today and Tuesday to fly to the Macedonian capital, Skopje, the ministry said. From Skopje, the refugees will be taken by bus into Kosovo, the ministry said in a statement.
NEWS
July 15, 1999 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Six weeks after NATO warplanes killed Sasa Pantic's best friend, along with Milanka Marinkovic's only son, the daughter of the leading opposition figure and seven other civilians in this small town, the forces of nature have taken over where the alliance left off. After an airstrike that already had changed the course of thousands of lives here, flood waters this week were tearing away large chunks of Varvarin itself, washing them downstream in the raging, rain-swollen Velika Morava River.
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