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Refugees Zaire

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NEWS
November 8, 1996 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
United Nations agencies and other aid groups scrambled Thursday to prepare emergency cross-border relief operations, but international diplomatic efforts again failed to gain access to more than 1 million Hutu refugees cut off in embattled eastern Zaire. Renewed fighting apparently erupted at the Mugunga refugee camp, about 15 miles west of the border city of Goma, Zaire.
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NEWS
June 6, 1997 | From Associated Press
Backing down from earlier assertions that it had nothing to do with alleged massacres of Rwandan refugees, Congo's government now acknowledges that some may have been killed in cross-fire during the recent civil war. President Laurent Kabila's government is hoping that the admission, while far from an acknowledgment that his forces committed atrocities, is enough to secure aid for his ravaged land during a visit today by envoy Bill Richardson, U.S. ambassador to the United Nations.
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NEWS
November 4, 1996 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of thousands of refugees were apparently moving deeper into Zaire on Sunday, cut off from all outside assistance or communication and caught in a civil war between the fleeing Zairian army and advancing rebel forces. U.N. officials, Western governments and African leaders responded with frantic pleas for a cease-fire, urgent calls for international intervention and a flurry of diplomatic initiatives.
NEWS
June 4, 1997 | From Reuters
The U.N. refugee agency urged Congo President Laurent Kabila and other African leaders Tuesday to take steps to protect Rwandan refugees in the wake of the killing last week of an aid worker and four refugees in the eastern Congo. Spokeswoman Pam O'Toole said the Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees is suspending its aid work at Karuba, near Goma, where Kabila's soldiers reportedly carried out the May 29 shooting.
NEWS
November 25, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Western military leaders meeting in Stuttgart, Germany, agreed on scenarios to help refugees in Zaire. But they did not specify how many troops might be needed under any of the options, which must now go to political leaders for consideration. They also did not say where a mission could be based or what soldiers' rules of engagement might be. Lt. Gen.
NEWS
November 30, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
Ambassadors of the United States and 13 other countries meeting in Canada's capital gave approval Friday to a multinational humanitarian mission to aid refugees in eastern Zaire. "Now, the multinational force is formally constituted," said Paul Heinbecker, a Canadian foreign affairs official who chaired a meeting of the ambassadors.
NEWS
November 6, 1996 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To hear rebel chieftain Andre Ngandu Kissasse tell it, the civil war boiling in eastern Zaire is not about ethnic Hutus or Tutsis or about regional secession or even about more than 1 million fleeing refugees. "Our objective is to liberate our country," Kissasse, a rebel military commander, explained here Tuesday in a dingy villa turned rebel headquarters. "We want to liberate Kinshasa." Kinshasa, Zaire's capital, is about 1,200 miles to the west through dense rain forests with few roads.
NEWS
August 19, 1994 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The mountain forests of Central Africa rise steeply from the banks of Lake Kivu at this remote, run-down resort town. The 200,000 or so residents here prefer to lift their eyes from the seedy streets and proclaim it the "green city." But now, under the unstoppable pressure of another Rwandan refugee migration, Bukavu is being reduced hour by hour to another squalid cesspool of misery.
NEWS
November 20, 1996 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Unitilte Uwihaye says she is 5 years old, but she sounds much older. She got separated from her parents and sisters, she calmly explained, when they went to fetch water during their brutal trek home from war-torn eastern Zaire. She then spent five long days and nights alone amid the terrible tumult of half a million refugees on the march. "I was very afraid," admitted the tiny child, draped in a soiled purple dress. "And hungry. I just had some beans. No water."
NEWS
November 20, 1996 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration, clearly relieved by a surge of Rwandan refugees heading home, sharply scaled back its Central African relief program Tuesday, canceling plans to send a battalion of paratroopers and deciding instead to dispatch a small contingent of support personnel. Defense Secretary William J.
NEWS
April 29, 1997 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.N. officials Monday called it an act of "utmost barbarism": In the middle of the night, soldiers burst into a hospital in eastern Zaire where 50 severely malnourished Rwandan children were receiving emergency food and threw them "like sacks of potatoes" onto the back of a truck to be driven away to an unknown fate.
NEWS
March 5, 1997 | Reuters
Residents' nerves are frayed in Zaire's strategic Congo River port of Kisangani as rebels advance on what would be the biggest prize so far in their whirlwind campaign. Tension is palpable in the crumbling streets of Kisangani, whose older residents have horrific memories of rebellions and subsequent army suppression during the 1960s. The better off have already fled by boat or plane.
NEWS
March 3, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Rebels said they captured the Tingi-Tingi refugee camp and the nearby town of Lubutu in eastern Zaire. The fighting drove tens of thousands of refugees north toward the government stronghold of Kisangani, which the rebels said was their next target. Rebel leader Laurent Kabila appealed to the U.N. to help about 170,000 refugees fleeing the fighting. Meanwhile, President Mobutu Sese Seko decided to delay his return from France for a few days to pursue a solution to the crisis, an aide said.
NEWS
March 2, 1997 | Associated Press
Foreign aid workers abandoned Zaire's third-largest city of Kisangani on Saturday, anticipating an exodus of tens of thousands of refugees fearing an attack by approaching rebels. The aid workers' departure leaves about 170,000 refugees without the daily food distributions that have sustained them since December at the Tingi-Tingi camp, 150 miles southeast of Kisangani. The rebels took up arms after the government tried to expel ethnic Tutsis from eastern Zaire.
NEWS
February 16, 1997 | From Associated Press
Rebels threatened Saturday to attack the largest refugee camp in eastern Zaire within three days unless Rwandans allegedly armed by the Zairian government clear out. Rebel leader Laurent Kabila said he would give the United Nations and world leaders "two, three days to solve the problems." If they fail, "We shall hit this camp badly and kick everybody out without any consideration from the international community.
NEWS
December 19, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
Hundreds of residents of the rebel-held eastern Zairian city of Goma fled Wednesday, saying they feared a counterattack by Zairian troops following the return of President Mobutu Sese Seko to his country. Residents said they had little confidence in the ability of Zairian rebels to defend the city, which fell in early November. "Twenty members of my family left for Bukavu since [Tuesday].
NEWS
April 29, 1997 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.N. officials Monday called it an act of "utmost barbarism": In the middle of the night, soldiers burst into a hospital in eastern Zaire where 50 severely malnourished Rwandan children were receiving emergency food and threw them "like sacks of potatoes" onto the back of a truck to be driven away to an unknown fate.
NEWS
November 3, 1996 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fearful of growing chaos and a widening war, the United Nations safely evacuated the last international aid workers from this embattled city Saturday after bands of rebel fighters backed by Rwandan government soldiers routed the Zairian army and captured the key border enclave. The fall of Goma, and the emergency withdrawal of about 130 terrified expatriates by road to nearby Rwanda, mean that no U.N.
NEWS
November 30, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
Ambassadors of the United States and 13 other countries meeting in Canada's capital gave approval Friday to a multinational humanitarian mission to aid refugees in eastern Zaire. "Now, the multinational force is formally constituted," said Paul Heinbecker, a Canadian foreign affairs official who chaired a meeting of the ambassadors.
NEWS
November 29, 1996 | Associated Press
A Canadian general met with Zaire's rebel leader Thursday to discuss how to deliver food to Rwandan refugees stuck in rebel-held parts of eastern Zaire. Canadian Lt. Gen. Maurice Baril, head of the proposed multinational intervention force, and rebel leader Laurent Kabila met for an hour at Lake Kivu. Meanwhile, thousands of new refugees streamed into Sake, west of Goma, where they were picked up by U.N. aid agency trucks and driven to the Rwandan border.
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