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Refuseniks

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NEWS
October 8, 1986 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
A group of veteran refuseniks Tuesday urged President Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev to break a stalemate on Jewish emigration from the Soviet Union and find ways to issue more visas to Soviet Jews when the two leaders meet this weekend in Iceland. The number of Jews allowed to leave the Soviet Union, which had already fallen off dramatically when Reagan and Gorbachev met last November in Geneva, has remained at the same level, or even a bit lower, the group said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2008 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
For Zev Yaroslavsky, the personal has always been political. Yaroslavsky has represented the western part of Los Angeles County as a member of the Board of Supervisors since 1994. Previously, he served on the L.A. City Council for 19 years. But before he began his life in local politics, Yaroslavky was one of the leading activists in the international movement to free Soviet Jews, who, for many decades, were essentially prisoners in their own country.
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OPINION
October 8, 2005
Re "Tracking Public Opinion Is a Delicate Blend of Science, Art," Oct. 4 Surely an important factor in analyzing poll results is the category of people who decline to reply to survey questions. Personally, I have no idea how many times I may have been dialed by poll-taking phone banks, because I hang up on callers who aren't known to me. Or, I just let voicemail take over. The article makes no mention of telephone refuseniks. Do the polling organizations keep statistics on that?
OPINION
October 8, 2005
Re "Tracking Public Opinion Is a Delicate Blend of Science, Art," Oct. 4 Surely an important factor in analyzing poll results is the category of people who decline to reply to survey questions. Personally, I have no idea how many times I may have been dialed by poll-taking phone banks, because I hang up on callers who aren't known to me. Or, I just let voicemail take over. The article makes no mention of telephone refuseniks. Do the polling organizations keep statistics on that?
NEWS
October 17, 1986 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, Times Staff Writer
Soviet "refusenik" David Goldfarb, who resisted KGB secret police pressure two years ago to frame U.S. journalist Nicholas Daniloff, was released suddenly Thursday by Soviet officials and flown to the United States. Goldfarb and his wife, Cecilia, flew from Moscow aboard the private jet of industrialist Armand Hammer, who helped arrange the Soviet dissident's release by personally lobbying high-ranking officials, including Anatoly F. Dobrynin, the former Soviet ambassador to the United States.
NEWS
June 1, 1988
Twenty-eight refusenik families will be allowed to emigrate from the Soviet Union from among 400 cases which U.S. officials raised during summit discussions with the Soviet Foreign Ministry this week, a prominent Jewish source said today. Yuli Kosharovsky, who has been denied permission to emigrate for 17 years, said in a telephone interview that his name was not on the list of 28 prospective emigres that he received from Assistant Secretary of State Richard Schifter.
NEWS
April 14, 1987 | WILLIAM J. EATON and ROBERT C. TOTH, Times Staff Writers
Secretary of State George P. Shultz took time out from arms control negotiations Monday to attend a Seder dinner and tell leading Jewish refuseniks that they should "never give up, never give up." Shultz said the United States welcomed a recent increase in Jewish emigration and the release of political prisoners, but added that he wants, in a word, "more." In an emotional address to about 75 Soviet and American Jews, he promised to raise the issue whenever U.S.
NEWS
February 27, 1987
In a show of international solidarity, members of B'nai B'rith gathered in Los Angeles and Orange counties to protest the Soviet government's policy of refusing Russian Jews the right to emigrate. The rallies were two of several gatherings held throughout California, the United States and 43 other countries to put pressure on the Soviet Union for the release of more Jews.
NEWS
December 7, 1987 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
Police officers, aided by hundreds of burly men in civilian clothes, forcibly broke up a demonstration planned by Jewish refuseniks Sunday and roughed up and briefly detained American television newsman Peter Arnett. About 80 refuseniks--Soviet citizens who have been denied exit visas--had planned to take part in a protest against Soviet restrictions on emigration at Moscow's Smolensky Square.
NEWS
January 4, 1986 | DON SHANNON, Times Staff Writer
"I still dream that I am on the plane and the KGB tells me they are taking back my visa," dentist Mark Nashpitz said Friday. Nashpitz, 37, is one of the 1,139 Jews who were allowed to leave the Soviet Union last year. At a press conference here Friday, he urged Americans not to forget the hundreds of thousands of Soviet Jews still waiting for permission to emigrate. He said he spent 15 years as a refusenik , the term applied to those Soviet citizens who have been denied exit visas.
WORLD
May 3, 2005 | Laura King, Times Staff Writer
Natan Sharansky, the onetime symbol of oppressed Soviet Jewry, quit his Cabinet post Monday to protest Israel's planned withdrawal from the Gaza Strip this summer. Sharansky, whose views on promoting democracy have won praise from President Bush, said Israel should relinquish Gaza only if the Palestinian government first carries out a wide range of reforms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 2004 | From Associated Press
Alexander Lerner, an eminent cyberneticist and a leading member of the "refusenik" movement that promoted Jewish emigration from the former Soviet Union, has died, a spokeswoman for an Israeli science institute said Tuesday. He was 90. Lerner died April 5 in Rehovot, the spokeswoman for the city's Weizmann Institute of Science said. The institute had not made an official announcement of his death.
WORLD
October 24, 2002 | Laura King, Times Staff Writer
JERUSALEM -- Israeli military reservists who say conscience will not permit them to serve in the West Bank and Gaza Strip took their fight Wednesday to Israel's Supreme Court, where arguments by both sides raised painful questions about duty, patriotism and what constitutes moral warfare.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1997
Benjamin Charny, 59, a refusenik who was allowed to leave the Soviet Union only after a major letter-writing campaign by Americans and Europeans. Charny was denied exit visas nine times by the Soviets. Several U.S. senators, including current California Gov. Pete Wilson, were among the thousands of people who wrote letters to the Kremlin on his behalf. Included in the massive effort was a student campaign at the Claremont Colleges and the offer of a teaching job at one of them, Pitzer College.
NEWS
December 22, 1992 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The happiness of Alexander Lerner overflows from his small office in the basement of the Weizmann Institute of Science here and virtually envelops all who pass. The warm and ebullient Lerner quickly ticks off the reasons for his joy. A coronary pump, the result of 20 years' research on an artificial heart, is ready for trial use. He lives in a comfortable flat with his son and daughter-in-law; his daughter is just down the street. He cannot think of any unmet material needs.
NEWS
October 3, 1991 | Associated Press
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev agreed Wednesday to review the cases of 355 "refuseniks" who have been denied Soviet permission to emigrate, the head of a U.S. committee on Soviet Jewry said. Gorbachev also acknowledged that anti-Semitism is a problem in the Soviet Union, although not a "deep-rooted" one, and he refused to issue a statement condemning it specifically, said Shoshana Cardin, leader of the National Conference on Soviet Jewry.
NEWS
October 16, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
The Soviet Union, in a surprise move welcomed by the Reagan Administration, today released Jewish dissident David Goldfarb, who once spurned a KGB overture to frame American newsman Nicholas Daniloff. Goldfarb and his wife, Cecilia, were released to American industrialist Armand Hammer and flew to the United States aboard the Occidental Petroleum Corp. chairman's corporate jetliner. They arrived at Newark International Airport in New Jersey late this afternoon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1985 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, Times Staff Writer
"Why, as a WASP, am I doing this?" Jane Fonda bristled Thursday when asked why she, a non-Jew, took up the cause of Ida Nudel, a Soviet-Jewish refusenik who has been trying for 14 years to obtain an exit visa. Nudel, who cannot openly practice Judaism in the Soviet Union, wants to join her sister in Israel. Fonda spent three days in the Soviet Union with Nudel in 1984.
NEWS
December 23, 1989 | MASHA HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first nationwide conference of Soviet Jews in nearly 70 years wound up a five-day meeting Friday with the warning that anti-Semitism is on the rise in the Soviet Union. Outside the hall where the session was being held, about 200 Palestinians demonstrated, shouting "Zionists, out!" On the conference's opening day Monday, Russian nationalists also had shouted "Zionists, go home!"
NEWS
December 21, 1989 | From Times wire services
Foreign Ministry officials today told American Jewish leaders attending the first national congress of Soviet Jews in nearly 70 years that most of the country's estimated 100 remaining refuseniks will be allowed to emigrate. Martin Wenick, executive director of the National Conference on Soviet Jewry, said the news about the refuseniks, Jews repeatedly refused permission to emigrate, came from Anatoly Adamishin, a deputy foreign minister.
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