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November 4, 2011
ART Raymond Pettibon For "Desire in Pursuyt of the Whole" — Raymond Pettibon's ninth solo exhibition at Regen Projects — the artist reaches into the cultural grab bag for imagery that offers plenty in the way of pop subtext, political baggage, art/kitsch tension and an off-kilter sense of humor. This heady mix, colliding with phrases and text snippets culled from a variety of sources, makes for enigmatic and pleasantly sensory-overloading works. Regen Projects, 633 N. Almont Drive, L.A. Opening reception 6-8 p.m. Free.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2014 | By David Pagel
Elliott Hundley's new paintings and sculptures are more muscular and skeletal than anything the 38-year-old artist has exhibited since his first solo show in 2006. They're also stranger and sexier, their boldness ennobled by an embrace of abstraction that leaves lots to the imagination and nothing to chance. In the past, a jittery wantonness suffused Hundley's art. Most of his works were made of thousands of cut-up photographs pasted and pinned into messy maelstroms of prickly energy.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2011
For "Desire in Pursuyt of the Whole" — Raymond Pettibon's ninth solo exhibition at Regen Projects — the artist reaches into the cultural grab bag for imagery that offers plenty in the way of pop subtext, political baggage, art/kitsch tension and an off-kilter sense of humor. This heady mix, colliding with phrases and text snippets culled from a variety of sources, makes for enigmatic and pleasantly sensory-overloading works. Regen Projects, 633 N. Almont Drive, L.A. Opening reception, Fri. 6-8 p.m. Free.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2014 | By Christopher Knight, Times art critic
If a sculptor is going to make paintings, then ceramics seem to be the way to go. That, at least, is the loopy lesson from Liz Larner's eccentrically engaging exhibition of recent work at Regen Projects. The show also includes more traditional freestanding sculptures, including a large, highly polished “X” of cast stainless steel that seems poised to leap into the air like a giant, agitated water bug. Nearby, a billowy black form looks like the tail of a leaping whale paired with its mirror reflection in water.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2013 | By Leah Ollman
Critic Raphael Rubinstein counts Sergej Jensen among "provisional" painters who exercise doubt, along with impossibility and incompleteness, as a core operating principle. There is an appealing, existentially steeped poetry to Jensen's approach to making art but also a less enticing measure of pretense. His extensive show at Regen Projects, his first in L.A., encompasses 10 years of work and a range of attitudes and materials. Jensen, born in Denmark and living in Berlin and New York, uses fabric as both palette and surface.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2013 | By Holly Myers
Given the extraordinary range of Catherine Opie's subject matter over the last 20 years - from Southern California freeways to Minnesota ice houses, the streets of Washington on President Obama's first inauguration to the interior of Elizabeth Taylor 's home, the fierce figure of performance artist Ron Athey to American high school football players - wh at's most striking initially about her recent work at Regen Projects is how closely it...
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 1993 | HUNTER DROHOJOWSKA-PHILP, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Anywhere else, this would be a funky bungalow. In West Hollywood, it's a tear-down. But the modest house is enjoying an exotic cultural moment before it becomes a memory. "First House" is the site of Richard Prince's installation of paintings and other works through April 30. It is the inaugural event for Regen Projects, formerly the Stuart Regen Gallery, which has scaled back its operations to fund four special projects a year. Is this a joke? Well, yes and no. The paintings are jokes.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2009 | Holly Myers
Discussing the genesis of his recent project, "Migration," which has its West Coast debut at Regen Projects this month, Doug Aitken tells the story of a conversation he had in Las Vegas with funk musician George Clinton. "He was staying at a Days Inn," Aitken recounts, "but he was playing at some really fancy casino. So I said to him, 'Why aren't you staying at the casino? I'm sure they would have given you a penthouse or something.' And he said" -- here Aitken slips into a low, world-weary, rock star voice -- " 'Yeah, you know, I've been on the road since, like, 1968 and I've been staying at the Days Inn since 1968, and all I want to do is fall asleep and wake up in the exact same place.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2013 | By Steve Appleford
The room is arranged like a gallery, hung with photographs of various sizes and shapes, framed and unframed, surrounding the artist Catherine Opie, who looks pleased as she observes from a rocking chair. This studio built behind her house in West Adams is where so many moments from her art and life have unfolded. Back in 2004, she made a self-portrait here, topless and tattooed, nursing her young son, Oliver, against a vivid red curtain. Across her chest were scars left over from a much earlier picture, a one-word message carved into her skin and still faintly reading, "Pervert.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times art critic
I dropped in at Regen Projects in Hollywood to see my friend Lari Pittman's new show, just installed and opening to the public on Saturday. The exhibition is very large - a whopping 92 paintings on canvas, panel and mostly paper - but the three mammoth works that anchor the main room dwarf everything. Titled as various “Flying Carpets,” each one is a boggling 10 feet high and 30 feet wide. No doubt there are many reasons for the daunting scale, which fits the work's overall theme of epic trauma - and equally epic possibility -- during what the artist has dubbed today's “Late Western Impaerium.” The spelling alone, with its Old World allusion to ancient Rome, reeks of life lived under crushing conditions of supreme power.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2013 | By David Ng
Artist John Baldessari has had a long association with the California Institute of the Arts, where he was a professor of art for nearly two decades. On Friday, the school announced  that it is naming a new art studio building on campus in honor of the 82-year-old artist. The John Baldessari Art Studio Building, which has already opened, cost $3.1 million to build and features approximately 7,000 square feet of space -- much of it used as studio space for art students and faculty.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2013 | By Leah Ollman
Too much of a good thing can be wonderful, Mae West famously quipped. She might have been standing in front of a Lari Pittman painting. The three epically-scaled works anchoring Pittman's show at Regen Projects forsake " or" to exuberantly embrace " and . " They -- and to only a slightly lesser extent the show's other paintings on canvas and paper -- are high-energy operatic productions. Even the titles tend to be prolonged and dramatic. The three 9-by-30-foot extravaganzas are named: "Flying Carpet With a Waning Moon Over a Violent Nation;" "Flying Carpet With Petri Dishes for a Disturbed Nation;" and "Flying Carpet With Magic Mirrors for a Distorted Nation.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times art critic
I dropped in at Regen Projects in Hollywood to see my friend Lari Pittman's new show, just installed and opening to the public on Saturday. The exhibition is very large - a whopping 92 paintings on canvas, panel and mostly paper - but the three mammoth works that anchor the main room dwarf everything. Titled as various “Flying Carpets,” each one is a boggling 10 feet high and 30 feet wide. No doubt there are many reasons for the daunting scale, which fits the work's overall theme of epic trauma - and equally epic possibility -- during what the artist has dubbed today's “Late Western Impaerium.” The spelling alone, with its Old World allusion to ancient Rome, reeks of life lived under crushing conditions of supreme power.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2013 | By Leah Ollman
Critic Raphael Rubinstein counts Sergej Jensen among "provisional" painters who exercise doubt, along with impossibility and incompleteness, as a core operating principle. There is an appealing, existentially steeped poetry to Jensen's approach to making art but also a less enticing measure of pretense. His extensive show at Regen Projects, his first in L.A., encompasses 10 years of work and a range of attitudes and materials. Jensen, born in Denmark and living in Berlin and New York, uses fabric as both palette and surface.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Boxing isn't what it used to be. What it used to be was a hugely popular, organized form of violent theater that crystallized the tensions among working class youth of diverse ethnic and religious backgrounds in polyglot America. “Arena,” Gary Simmons' wistfully beautiful exhibition of recent mixed-media paintings at Regen Projects, recalls that storied and controversial past, while shifting the social competition from sports to art. Twelve paintings on plywood and paper by the New York-based artist, including a dazzling mural-scale work affixed to a wall like a monumental billboard, are joined by a transparent, free-standing work that returns the billboard motif to three dimensions.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2013 | By David Pagel
At a time when technology seems to be all about getting more people to see more images more quickly and clearly than ever before, Jennifer Pastor's “Endless Arena” comes across as a wonderfully nutty throwback to a bygone era. The spindly sculpture, in a small back gallery at Regen Projects, resembles nothing so much as the armature for some kind of homegrown experiment or the framework for an ad-hoc stage set. It's both and more. But you won't know that if you don't look closely.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2014 | By Christopher Knight, Times art critic
If a sculptor is going to make paintings, then ceramics seem to be the way to go. That, at least, is the loopy lesson from Liz Larner's eccentrically engaging exhibition of recent work at Regen Projects. The show also includes more traditional freestanding sculptures, including a large, highly polished “X” of cast stainless steel that seems poised to leap into the air like a giant, agitated water bug. Nearby, a billowy black form looks like the tail of a leaping whale paired with its mirror reflection in water.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2008 | PAUL YOUNG
"I was thinking of L.A. when I came up with this idea," says British artist Gillian Wearing of her show at Regen Projects (regenprojects.com; ends Aug. 23). "L.A. being the place of dreams and transformations." Her idea was to take average people and transform them into sexy pinups. But to do that she had to first find subjects (all -- including men -- responded to an ad on a British website), give them Playboy-style photo shoots and then work with retouchers to perfect their features.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2013 | By Holly Myers
Given the extraordinary range of Catherine Opie's subject matter over the last 20 years - from Southern California freeways to Minnesota ice houses, the streets of Washington on President Obama's first inauguration to the interior of Elizabeth Taylor 's home, the fierce figure of performance artist Ron Athey to American high school football players - wh at's most striking initially about her recent work at Regen Projects is how closely it...
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2013 | By Steve Appleford
The room is arranged like a gallery, hung with photographs of various sizes and shapes, framed and unframed, surrounding the artist Catherine Opie, who looks pleased as she observes from a rocking chair. This studio built behind her house in West Adams is where so many moments from her art and life have unfolded. Back in 2004, she made a self-portrait here, topless and tattooed, nursing her young son, Oliver, against a vivid red curtain. Across her chest were scars left over from a much earlier picture, a one-word message carved into her skin and still faintly reading, "Pervert.
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