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Regeneration

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 1987
How fitting were the letters (Nov. 27) in response to the benighted piece by Richard L. Weiss on the putative dangers of a no-growth philosophy in the light of your poignant warning ("Dwindling Wildlife," Editorial, Nov. 24) respecting the loss of our natural heritage in California--land, water, animals and birds alike. Why is the distinction between growth and regeneration so carelessly, if not willfully, obscured in any discussion of the future of economic health of our society? Is there a political figure in view who dares to speak of a prosperous steady-state economy wherein ongoing innovation, reconstruction and revitalization sustain a healthy economy in the absence of net growth?
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2014 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
"The 100" is a new TV series about teenagers living alone - or are they? - on a post-apocalyptic future Earth. Wherever else we are, we are definitely on the CW, where, apart from reality shows, every series but "Hart of Dixie" either takes place in another time or features characters supernatural, superheroic and/or science-fictional. Some focus on characters, which is not necessarily to say actors, of high school age. Premiering Wednesday, "The 100" is based on Kass Morgan's young-adult novel of the same name.
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NEWS
August 13, 2010
The long-sought goal of helping paralyzed people regain some ability to move is a step closer after researchers announced they have induced nerve regeneration in mice with severe spinal cord injury. A team of researchers from UC Irvine, UC San Diego and Harvard deleted an enzyme called PTEN (a phosphatase and tensin homolog) which controls a specific molecular pathway that regulates cell growth. PTEN activity is low during periods of growth and then shuts off when growth is completed.
TRAVEL
February 3, 2013
You can help a child at the same time you book a hotel stay - without an added price hike. Name: Rooomr.com What it does: Rooomr is a hotel booking site that also seeks to improve the lives of homeless youth by donating 5% of its gross income to Re-Generation USA, a philanthropic endeavor of Virgin Mobile USA, at the same time it delivers hip hotels to style and culture-conscious travelers. What's hot: I expected to pay more for a hotel room because Rooomr was donating to a cause, but not so. When I tested hotel rooms for a weekend getaway in Santa Barbara, Charleston, S.C., and New York City, the cost of the room was the same on Rooomr as it was on Expedia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 1990 | From staff and wire reports
A new medical technique can regenerate severed spinal cord nerves in rats, but whether the revolutionary approach will restore mobility or help humans remains an open question, researchers reported last week. Swiss scientists said their technique, which works by removing the body's natural "brake" on nerve growth, has triggered regrowth of up to a half-inch in the nerve strands that make up a major part of rats' spinal cords.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Scientists said last week that they had succeeded in regenerating nerve fibers from the human central nervous system for the first time, a step that could eventually lead to restoring some function to paralyzed limbs. The University of Miami researchers cautioned in their paper in the journal Experimental Neurology that the work has been done only in the laboratory and that it will probably be five years before researchers attempt to restore movement to paralyzed muscles.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2011
Eiko & Koma: 'Regeneration' Where: REDCAT, 631 W. 2nd St., Los Angeles When: 8:30 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday, 3 p.m. Sunday Tickets: $25-$30 Information: (213) 237-2800 or http://www.redcat.org
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A newly discovered molecule found in the damaged brains of laboratory rats prevents nerves from regenerating and may be a key to understanding why most victims of brain and spinal injuries fail to recover, researchers said last week.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2000 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The UCLA Film Archives' "Nitrate Walsh," a series of notable Raoul Walsh films, commences tonight at 7:30 in Melnitz Hall's James Bridges Theater with the rarely seen "Regeneration" (1915) and the gangster classic (and TV staple) "The Roaring Twenties" (1939). Walsh was a dynamic, expressive director, a master of action, who had a gift for revealing emotional vulnerability in even his roughest, toughest heroes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 2009 | By Bob Pool
Nancy Gjerset was finished sifting through the ashes for the day when the young woman stopped on Big Tujunga Canyon Road and offered a strange compliment. "She said, 'I hope you'll forgive me, but this is absolutely stunning,' " Gjerset recalled. That is hardly the way Gjerset looks at the ghostly, blackened trees around her and at the ghastly, charred foundation of her home of nearly 40 years that lies at her feet. The house burned to the ground Aug. 29. It was one of about 90 dwellings destroyed by the Station fire, the massive wildfire that killed two county firefighters and burned 250 square miles of Angeles National Forest.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2011
Eiko & Koma: 'Regeneration' Where: REDCAT, 631 W. 2nd St., Los Angeles When: 8:30 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday, 3 p.m. Sunday Tickets: $25-$30 Information: (213) 237-2800 or http://www.redcat.org
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2011 | By Valerie Gladstone, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Reporting from New York High above the city, with a clear view of the icy streets below, the illustrious choreographers and dancers Eiko and Koma began a recent morning in their midtown apartment deciding what photographs should go into a new book about their work, soon to be published by the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis. It complements their current tour's "Regeneration" program, which comes to Los Angeles this week. Since the early '70s, Eiko and Koma have created bold, almost still, theatrical works of elemental power.
NEWS
August 13, 2010
The long-sought goal of helping paralyzed people regain some ability to move is a step closer after researchers announced they have induced nerve regeneration in mice with severe spinal cord injury. A team of researchers from UC Irvine, UC San Diego and Harvard deleted an enzyme called PTEN (a phosphatase and tensin homolog) which controls a specific molecular pathway that regulates cell growth. PTEN activity is low during periods of growth and then shuts off when growth is completed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 2009 | By Bob Pool
Nancy Gjerset was finished sifting through the ashes for the day when the young woman stopped on Big Tujunga Canyon Road and offered a strange compliment. "She said, 'I hope you'll forgive me, but this is absolutely stunning,' " Gjerset recalled. That is hardly the way Gjerset looks at the ghostly, blackened trees around her and at the ghastly, charred foundation of her home of nearly 40 years that lies at her feet. The house burned to the ground Aug. 29. It was one of about 90 dwellings destroyed by the Station fire, the massive wildfire that killed two county firefighters and burned 250 square miles of Angeles National Forest.
SCIENCE
December 22, 2009 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
Nestled between two boulders on a low rise in the Jurupa Hills of Riverside County, a good 30 miles from its nearest living relative, lies the ultimate survivor -- an oak bush that researchers believe is 13,000 years old. That's 1,000 years older than a previously identified Palm Springs creosote bush that was thought to be the oldest plant in California, 8,000 years older than bristlecone pines and 10,000 years older than the redwoods. While it is one of the world's oldest living plants, it is probably not the oldest.
BUSINESS
November 7, 2009 | Randy Lewis and Todd Martens
A federal court in Los Angeles this week issued a temporary restraining order against a music website that recently had been offering the entire Beatles catalog for downloading at 25 cents per song. The Santa Cruz-based BlueBeat earlier in the week was hit with a copyright infringement lawsuit by EMI's Capitol Records, the group's U.S. label. The order set back a novel legal argument by BlueBeat that songs produced through digital regeneration are akin to songs performed by cover bands and therefore do not run afoul of copyright law. BlueBeat had argued in court filings that its downloads were legal because the company had created entirely new versions by computer through a process called "psychoacoustic simulations" that makes the re-created songs sound just like the original recordings.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2011 | By Valerie Gladstone, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Reporting from New York High above the city, with a clear view of the icy streets below, the illustrious choreographers and dancers Eiko and Koma began a recent morning in their midtown apartment deciding what photographs should go into a new book about their work, soon to be published by the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis. It complements their current tour's "Regeneration" program, which comes to Los Angeles this week. Since the early '70s, Eiko and Koma have created bold, almost still, theatrical works of elemental power.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1985
The front page of the March 20 edition of The Times provided a sad commentary on the inhumane (some might say subhuman) priorities of the Reagan Administration. On the left side of Page 1 was an article, "Cuts Wound Biomedical Researchers." This article described the plight of a group of scientists at New York University Medical Center who have been conducting research into brain-cell regeneration. The National Institute of Health saw in this research the promise of eventual cures for Alzheimer's disease, cerebral palsy, various birth defects, strokes and spinal cord injuries.
SCIENCE
April 4, 2009 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Scientists said Thursday that they had shown the human body regenerates heart cells at a rate of about 1% a year. The study of 50 volunteers, using a dating method that detects traces of a carbon isotope left by Cold War nuclear bomb tests, raises the prospect of artificially stimulating the renewal process someday, they reported in the journal Science. "It would be a way to try and help the heart to some self-help rather than transplanting new cells," Jonas Frisen of Sweden's Karolinska Institute said in a telephone interview.
SCIENCE
August 28, 2008 | Karen Kaplan, Times Staff Writer
Injecting a cocktail of proteins directly into the bodies of diabetic mice, researchers have converted normal pancreas cells into insulin-producing cells -- a genetic transformation that could pave the way for treating intractable diseases and injuries using a patient's own supply of healthy tissue. The Harvard University scientists activated a trio of dormant genes that commanded the cells to transform themselves, much as a person might upload a new operating system onto a computer to change a PC into a Mac. Within 10 days, the pancreas cells ceased their normal function -- making gut enzymes to digest food -- and instead produced insulin to regulate blood sugar, according to a study published online Wednesday in the journal Nature.
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