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September 8, 2012 | By Steven Zeitchik
TORONTO -- “The American culture is so caught up with what we want -- the fancy cars and the shiny jewelry -- as opposed to what we have,” the man was holding forth. “And the guns, there are too many guns, and too much violence, and that's why we have shootings in movie theaters and high schools.” It's a sunny Friday afternoon on the roof deck of a Toronto arts center, and these words aren't coming from a Buddhist monk or Mormon minister. Quite the opposite - they're coming from Snoop Dogg, the man who has served as one of the high priests of that culture of materialism and gun-toting for much of the last two decades.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2014 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
The Facebook page of the dancer known as Reggae Pops has been filled with memories over the past hours as longtime club-goers pay honor to a smooth-moving fixture on the city's night-life scene. Pops, born Nemencio Jose Andujar, died earlier this week, leaving a huge hole on the city's dance floor. Best known to many for his star turn in the video for Lianne La Havas' "Age," Pops could be seen throughout the city's groovier clubs, be it the regular Wednesday night reggae party Dub Club, the summer Grand Performances series in downtown Los Angeles or anywhere a rhythm could be found.
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NEWS
May 2, 2011 | By Avital Binshtock, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The "Rum, Reggae and Recline" package from British tour company Black Tomato is a weeklong retreat that lets the traveler experience the Caribbean nation's sights, sounds and tastes: tropical cocktails in the private airport lounge, jerk chicken in downtown Kingston and myriad things between. At Strawberry Hill, unwind at the Living Spa or head out for a guided hike. There'll be beach time on the south coast, a visit to the famed Little Ochie seafood restaurant and a stay at bohemian Jakes Hotel, where options include going on a crocodile safari and visiting an eight-tiered waterfall.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2013 | By August Brown
Junior Murvin had one of the greatest reggae singles ever. " Police & Thieves " is a genre staple and one of reggae's most perpetually covered tracks. The singer died Monday in Jamaica, and his song will be the centerpiece of his legacy. Murvin's age has been listed as 64 and 67 in varying reports . The singer had recently been hospitalized for diabetes and blood pressure-related illnesses, but a cause of death was not immediately known. PHOTOS: Notable deaths of 2013 Murvin was discovered by legendary producer Lee "Scratch" Perry after performing in lounges in Portland parish, east of the capital of Kingston.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2012 | By August Brown
The Long Beach rapper Snoop Dogg has several iconic traits -- a laid-back and menacing flow, evocatively violent lyrics and a deep affection for cannabis sativa among them. He'll get to keep at least one of those interests in his new incarnation as Snoop Lion, an alias gleaned from a new interest in Rastafarianism and a hard pivot to traditional reggae music. The identity change, which he first announced last week, is suprising but not unprecedented in contemporary hip-hop (Nas recorded a collaborative album of reggae-infused tunes with Damian Marley)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
On Wednesday morning, the artist also known as Snoop Dogg unveiled the newest work under his reggae pseudonym, Snoop Lion. The rapper from Long Beach announced last year that he'd decided on both a new name and style of music he'd be making for the foreseeable future, and was working on a documentary,  "Reincarnated," about his shift toward righteous reggae positivity. Snoop Lion started wearing Jamaica's national colors of yellow, red and green -- and started referring to his herb of choice as "ganja" instead of "chronic.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2012 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
What's a reggae song without the lingo? What's a lion without a roar? These and other mystical questions spring to mind during a first listen of "La La La," the debut single by new reggae artist Snoop Lion, formerly known to the world as Long Beach rapper Snoop Dogg, Snoop Doggy Dogg, the Bigg Boss Dogg, Bigg Snoop Dogg and Snoop D-O Double G. A few weeks ago, the artist born Calvin Broadus announced that he was setting aside the Snoop Dogg name...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Joe Gibbs, 65, an influential reggae music producer who helped create the 1970s hit "Two Sevens Clash" for Culture, died Feb. 20 of a heart attack in Jamaica, according to news reports. Born Joel Gibson, he opened a record shop and a recording studio in Kingston, Jamaica, in the late '60s and began producing records with noted reggae recording engineer Lee Perry. He later worked with co-producer and engineer Errol Thompson, and they became known as the Mighty Two. In addition to "Two Sevens Clash," which became popular on the British punk scene, the producing team had success with Dennis Brown's "How Can I Leave," J.C. Lodge's cover of Charley Pride's "Someone Loves You Honey" and many other reggae and dub recordings with Gibbs' house band, the Professionals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2008 | From the Associated Press
The board of the Del Mar Fairgrounds has approved pat-down searches at reggae concerts after complaints about marijuana and tobacco use during a Ziggy Marley show earlier this year at the San Diego County Fair. The San Diego Union-Tribune reported Wednesday that the fairgrounds' board of directors voted to approve the searches only at reggae concerts. It also approved a ban on smoking at the fair. The 22nd District Agricultural Assn., which governs the state-owned fairgrounds, also approved restricting reggae shows to adults 21 and older and requiring reggae artists to sign a contract prohibiting the promotion of drugs while at the fairgrounds.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 1987 | DON SNOWDEN
When Aswad's lead singer Brinsley Forde asked, "Do you want to hear another style?" near the close of the British reggae group's 90-minute headlining set Sunday, the crowd of about 2,000 at the Cal State Dominguez Hill Velodrome got more than they bargained for. What followed was a verse of "Jailhouse Rock" before the group plunged back into its smooth rendition of Toots & the Maytals' "54-46 Was My Number." Diversity and sophistication were the twin hallmarks of Aswad's impressive set.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
On Wednesday morning, the artist also known as Snoop Dogg unveiled the newest work under his reggae pseudonym, Snoop Lion. The rapper from Long Beach announced last year that he'd decided on both a new name and style of music he'd be making for the foreseeable future, and was working on a documentary,  "Reincarnated," about his shift toward righteous reggae positivity. Snoop Lion started wearing Jamaica's national colors of yellow, red and green -- and started referring to his herb of choice as "ganja" instead of "chronic.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2013 | By Chris Lee, Los Angeles Times
Snoop Dogg had come to Burbank to let loose the lion. Engulfed by a haze of marijuana smoke thick as London fog in a hotel suite high above the so-called Media Capital of the World, the gangsta rap superstar surrendered himself to a hairdresser's strenuous manipulations as she twisted and caressed his skinny braids into cheroot-shaped dreadlocks. The Doggfather's coiffure needed to be Rastafari-real, after all, for his television debut as the new Snoop. One Love Snoop. Reggae Snoop.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2012 | By Paula L. Woods
Kingston Noir Edited by Colin Channer Akashic Books: 285 pp; $15.95 trade paper original Starting in 2004 with "Brooklyn Noir," the more than 50 titles in the Akashic Books series of crime fiction have been distinguished by contributions from writers who live in or write about cities and areas rife with Hollywood-influenced dark sensibilities (Los Angeles, Manhattan, San Francisco) as well as unexpected places (the Twin Cities, Orange County, Delhi) but whose stories teem nonetheless with betrayal, rage and revenge.
NEWS
September 8, 2012 | By Steven Zeitchik
TORONTO -- “The American culture is so caught up with what we want -- the fancy cars and the shiny jewelry -- as opposed to what we have,” the man was holding forth. “And the guns, there are too many guns, and too much violence, and that's why we have shootings in movie theaters and high schools.” It's a sunny Friday afternoon on the roof deck of a Toronto arts center, and these words aren't coming from a Buddhist monk or Mormon minister. Quite the opposite - they're coming from Snoop Dogg, the man who has served as one of the high priests of that culture of materialism and gun-toting for much of the last two decades.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 2012
MUSIC The first L.A. appearance of Snoop Dogg in his new Snoop Lion reggae visage is the highlight of the H20 Music Festival, with Ozomatli, Gym Class Heroes and Paulina Rubio holding up the undercard. Los Angeles State Historic Park, 1245 N. Spring St, L.A. 3 p.m. Sat. $25. H20musicfestival.com.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2012 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
What's a reggae song without the lingo? What's a lion without a roar? These and other mystical questions spring to mind during a first listen of "La La La," the debut single by new reggae artist Snoop Lion, formerly known to the world as Long Beach rapper Snoop Dogg, Snoop Doggy Dogg, the Bigg Boss Dogg, Bigg Snoop Dogg and Snoop D-O Double G. A few weeks ago, the artist born Calvin Broadus announced that he was setting aside the Snoop Dogg name...
NEWS
June 10, 1993 | RICK VANDERKNYFF
A rapper from Panama, a reggae singer from South Africa and two calypso greats are on the bill for FESTAC Explosion '93, a celebration of Caribbean music Sunday at the Rainbow Lagoon in Long Beach. El General (Edgardo Franco) is a native of Panama who emigrated to New York with his family in 1985 and has since gone on to become one of the top Latin rappers.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 1989 | RICHARD CROMELIN
Lucky Dube is a South African singer who four years ago jumped from the comfort of Zulu pop to the more uncertain world of reggae. It was a brave cultural statement for an African to adopt the African-destiny cause of the Jamaican music, but the artistic results on display in Dube's L.A. debut Friday at the Palace were mixed. Except for one a cappella choral piece, the wiry performer made no attempt to blend the music of the homeland with that of the exiles seeking the homeland. Reggae's politics my be radical, but the musicians tend to follow the rules.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2012 | By August Brown
The Long Beach rapper Snoop Dogg has several iconic traits -- a laid-back and menacing flow, evocatively violent lyrics and a deep affection for cannabis sativa among them. He'll get to keep at least one of those interests in his new incarnation as Snoop Lion, an alias gleaned from a new interest in Rastafarianism and a hard pivot to traditional reggae music. The identity change, which he first announced last week, is suprising but not unprecedented in contemporary hip-hop (Nas recorded a collaborative album of reggae-infused tunes with Damian Marley)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2012 | Katherine Tulich
When you think reggae, the first name that springs to mind is Bob -- Marley, that is, but probably not Bob Andy. A contemporary of Marley's, the Jamaican-born Andy is making a rare appearance at Sunday's "Legends of Reggae" concert, part of KCRW's World Festival at the Hollywood Bowl. " I'm here to put a face to the name," the singer says, laughing. Considered one of reggae's most influential songwriters, Andy has songs that have been recorded by a variety of artists including Gregory Isaacs, the Specials, Taj Mahal, Maxi Priest and UB40.
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