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September 13, 2012 | By Reed Johnson
This just in from Daddy Yankee, courtesy of the Mexico City newspaper El Universal : Reggaetón isn't sexist toward women. In fact, las mujeres are among the music genre's biggest consumers. In the interview with El Universal, published earlier this week, the Puerto Rican reggaetón star also defended reggaetoneros against the charge that their music stirred up trouble in Mexico City last July in connection with a canceled reggaetón concert. "It's unjust to put the blame on the movement, on the music, when it has more to do with poor business logistics," Daddy Yankee told the newspaper in Spanish.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2014 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
This post has been updated. See below for details. A "Game of Thrones" mixtape. Let that sink in for a second. Now. What would that sound like? War drums and pastoral lutes? Maybe some gutteral Gregorian chants? Music that sounds like Marcus Mumford's great-great-great-great-great-great grandfather? Lots of Iron Maiden? Deep tracks from Jethro Tull? No. When you think of “Game of Thrones,” you think hip-hop and reggaeton -- of course -- and if you don't, the series is hoping its new mix will set you on the proper course.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2012 | By Reed Johnson
In Panamanian street patois, the word raka -- short for rakataka -- refers to a person who's poor, powerless and looked down on by snobs as déclassé. Or a gang-banger. Or worse. But as appropriated by the Oakland musical duo Los Rakas , it's a badge of honor, like the Mexican slang term nac o , shorthand for barrio cool. "It means somebody from the ghetto who is proud of who they are," says Raka Dun, who along with his cousin Raka Rich makes up the Panamanian-American-by-way-of-the-Bay-Area group.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2012 | By Reed Johnson
In Panamanian street patois, the word raka -- short for rakataka -- refers to a person who's poor, powerless and looked down on by snobs as déclassé. Or a gang-banger. Or worse. But as appropriated by the Oakland musical duo Los Rakas , it's a badge of honor, like the Mexican slang term nac o , shorthand for barrio cool. "It means somebody from the ghetto who is proud of who they are," says Raka Dun, who along with his cousin Raka Rich makes up the Panamanian-American-by-way-of-the-Bay-Area group.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2014 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
This post has been updated. See below for details. A "Game of Thrones" mixtape. Let that sink in for a second. Now. What would that sound like? War drums and pastoral lutes? Maybe some gutteral Gregorian chants? Music that sounds like Marcus Mumford's great-great-great-great-great-great grandfather? Lots of Iron Maiden? Deep tracks from Jethro Tull? No. When you think of “Game of Thrones,” you think hip-hop and reggaeton -- of course -- and if you don't, the series is hoping its new mix will set you on the proper course.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2009 | Yvonne Villarreal
Alternative reggaeton duo garnered five nominations, the most of any artist, for the 10th annual Latin Grammy Awards announced Thursday at the Conga Room in downtown Los Angeles. Among the nominations, the Puerto Rican half-brothers are up for album of the year for their third studio offering, "Los de Atras Vienen Conmigo." They'll compete against Andres Cepeda, Luis Enrique, Mercedes Sosa and Ivan Lins & the Metropole Orchestra. "It's great -- we're up for album of the year!
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2008 | Randy Lewis
After rapper Jay-Z opens the renovated Hollywood Palladium on Oct. 15, the 68-year-old venue will rejoin the Southern California concert scene with an inaugural lineup heavy on alt-rock and hard-rock music, with splashes of hip-hop, reggaeton and rock en espanol. Gym Class Heroes and the Roots will team up for an Oct. 17 show, followed by Flogging Molly (Oct. 25), the Kooks (Oct. 28), Rise Against (Oct. 31, Nov. 1 and 2), Dragonforce (Nov. 7) and La Fabrika del Reggaeton (Nov. 8)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2008 | AGUSTIN GURZA
SEN. JOHN McCAIN was smiling as widely as the Cheshire Cat when he announced this week the surprise endorsement of a big Latin music star with a most patriotic name, Daddy Yankee. But McCain may not be as happy with the way politicians are depicted in the bloody new movie that marks Yankee's debut as an actor, "Talento de Barrio," which opens here next month. The reggaeton rapper plays Edgar Dinero, a petty gangster who lords over some poor projects in Puerto Rico, killing rivals with a vengeance and peeling off bills from fat wads of cash to get his crew into raunchy discos.
NEWS
August 18, 2005
The reggaeton express is picking up speed. Little more than three months after the Puerto Rico-spawned hybrid of Latin reggae and hip-hop made its biggest mark locally with the two-day Reggaeton Invasion concerts at Gibson Amphitheatre, some of the genre's top acts are back for Reggaeton Invasion 2, a one-nighter headlined by the charismatic Ivy Queen, who stole the show the first time around. Also on the bill are the duos Wisin y Yandel and Zion & Lennox.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2012 | By Reed Johnson
This just in from Daddy Yankee, courtesy of the Mexico City newspaper El Universal : Reggaetón isn't sexist toward women. In fact, las mujeres are among the music genre's biggest consumers. In the interview with El Universal, published earlier this week, the Puerto Rican reggaetón star also defended reggaetoneros against the charge that their music stirred up trouble in Mexico City last July in connection with a canceled reggaetón concert. "It's unjust to put the blame on the movement, on the music, when it has more to do with poor business logistics," Daddy Yankee told the newspaper in Spanish.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2011 | By Nate Jackson, Los Angeles Times
It's been two years since DJ Dave Nada spawned a dance genre that propelled him from Washington, D.C., nightclub fixture to unwitting sire of a rhythmic revolution. Since 2009, moombahton — Nada's woofer-rattling concoction of Dutch house and reggaeton — has become a rapidly mutating force in DJ culture, collecting piles of fans and eclectic sub-genres. So, when Nada decided to relocate to Los Angeles in 2010 to further his DJ career, the monstrous music movement he hatched in D.C. wasn't far behind.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2009 | Yvonne Villarreal
Alternative reggaeton duo garnered five nominations, the most of any artist, for the 10th annual Latin Grammy Awards announced Thursday at the Conga Room in downtown Los Angeles. Among the nominations, the Puerto Rican half-brothers are up for album of the year for their third studio offering, "Los de Atras Vienen Conmigo." They'll compete against Andres Cepeda, Luis Enrique, Mercedes Sosa and Ivan Lins & the Metropole Orchestra. "It's great -- we're up for album of the year!
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2008 | AGUSTIN GURZA
SEN. JOHN McCAIN was smiling as widely as the Cheshire Cat when he announced this week the surprise endorsement of a big Latin music star with a most patriotic name, Daddy Yankee. But McCain may not be as happy with the way politicians are depicted in the bloody new movie that marks Yankee's debut as an actor, "Talento de Barrio," which opens here next month. The reggaeton rapper plays Edgar Dinero, a petty gangster who lords over some poor projects in Puerto Rico, killing rivals with a vengeance and peeling off bills from fat wads of cash to get his crew into raunchy discos.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2008 | Randy Lewis
After rapper Jay-Z opens the renovated Hollywood Palladium on Oct. 15, the 68-year-old venue will rejoin the Southern California concert scene with an inaugural lineup heavy on alt-rock and hard-rock music, with splashes of hip-hop, reggaeton and rock en espanol. Gym Class Heroes and the Roots will team up for an Oct. 17 show, followed by Flogging Molly (Oct. 25), the Kooks (Oct. 28), Rise Against (Oct. 31, Nov. 1 and 2), Dragonforce (Nov. 7) and La Fabrika del Reggaeton (Nov. 8)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 2007 | Agustin Gurza; Steve Appleford
Daddy Yankee "El Cartel: The Big Boss" (El Cartel/Interscope) * * * It's been three years since Daddy Yankee's turbo-charged "Gasolina" roared to the top of the charts and signaled the mainstream arrival of reggaeton, the down-and-dirty Latino rap style cultivated in the urban barrios of Puerto Rico. The revved-up single triggered predictions of a hip-hop crossover and a new Latin music craze. But the craze never came and the race for a crossover has since been canceled.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2006 | Agustin Gurza, Times Staff Writer
In reggaeton, as in rap, performers have a macho compulsion to outdo each other, usually with faster, smoother and wittier rhymes. But by any standard, singer Don Omar earned top bragging rights Thursday at the Gibson Amphitheatre with a sensational show that was part Broadway musical, part born-again revival and part Latino party singalong.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2005 | Agustin Gurza, Times Staff Writer
When Puerto Rican rapper Daddy Yankee appeared on stage Friday at Staples Center dressed in white and seated on a tall, gaudy throne with women sprawled at his feet, he wasn't being subtle about who he thinks he is: the crown prince of reggaeton, Latin music's hot new hip-hop hybrid.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2006 | Agustin Gurza, Times Staff Writer
In reggaeton, as in rap, performers have a macho compulsion to outdo each other, usually with faster, smoother and wittier rhymes. But by any standard, singer Don Omar earned top bragging rights Thursday at the Gibson Amphitheatre with a sensational show that was part Broadway musical, part born-again revival and part Latino party singalong.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2006 | Agustin Gurza, Times Staff Writer
REGGAETON may be running out of gasolina. Radio stations that flocked to the thumping Latino hip-hop style have seen their ratings slip in recent weeks. In at least three markets -- Las Vegas, Dallas and Miami -- stations that gambled on the music's growing popularity have since switched back to more traditional musical formats.
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