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Regina Benjamin

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OPINION
July 14, 2009
The news cameras cut away from the Senate hearings on Supreme Court nominee Sonia Sotomayor for just a few minutes, but it was enough time for history to be made at the other end of Pennsylvania Avenue as well. There, President Obama announced his nomination of another woman from an underrepresented minority who, like Sotomayor, understands grand public policy as an intellectual and as one who has lived it through personal experience.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
February 4, 2014 | By Lalita Clozel
WASHINGTON - President Obama's choice to become the next surgeon general spent much of his confirmation hearing Tuesday deflecting criticism from Republicans, who attacked him for his political activism, ties to the president and relative inexperience. Vivek Hallegere Murthy, who at 36 would be one of the youngest surgeon generals, was chided for advocating gun control in the aftermath of the December 2012 school shooting in Newtown, Conn., and for backing the Affordable Care Act as a co-founder of Doctors for America, formerly Doctors for Obama.
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NATIONAL
July 20, 2009 | Richard Fausset
Like most everyone in this small, scruffy city of boat builders and fishermen, Sammy Duffy tends to rave about surgeon general nominee Regina Benjamin and all that she has done for the hard-working people here who labor without the safety net of health insurance.
NEWS
August 26, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
Dr. Regina Benjamin, surgeon general of the United States, is warning American women of an impediment to a healthy, active life: their hairstyles. Benjamin said that the expensive products and time-consuming procedures that some women, especially African American women, invest in to straighten and control their tight curls may deter them from working out. After all, just a little moisture could undo the hairdo that was the result of a lot of...
NATIONAL
February 4, 2014 | By Lalita Clozel
WASHINGTON - President Obama's choice to become the next surgeon general spent much of his confirmation hearing Tuesday deflecting criticism from Republicans, who attacked him for his political activism, ties to the president and relative inexperience. Vivek Hallegere Murthy, who at 36 would be one of the youngest surgeon generals, was chided for advocating gun control in the aftermath of the December 2012 school shooting in Newtown, Conn., and for backing the Affordable Care Act as a co-founder of Doctors for America, formerly Doctors for Obama.
NEWS
August 26, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
Dr. Regina Benjamin, surgeon general of the United States, is warning American women of an impediment to a healthy, active life: their hairstyles. Benjamin said that the expensive products and time-consuming procedures that some women, especially African American women, invest in to straighten and control their tight curls may deter them from working out. After all, just a little moisture could undo the hairdo that was the result of a lot of...
NATIONAL
July 14, 2009 | Kristina Sherry
President Obama announced Monday that he would nominate Dr. Regina M. Benjamin -- a family physician who founded a health clinic in a small, shrimp-farming town in Alabama -- to be the nation's surgeon general. Benjamin in 1995 became the first black woman and the youngest doctor elected to the board of the American Medical Assn. Last year she received a MacArthur Foundation "genius" grant for treating patients in the Gulf Coast region regardless of their ability to pay.
OPINION
January 28, 2011 | By Henry I. Miller
Although some of the nation's healthcare issues are abstruse and vexing, others are relatively approachable. Many in this latter category fall within the province of the U.S. surgeon general. But the incumbent is nowhere to be found. The position of surgeon general is unusual in that it is considered prestigious but lacks virtually any budget, staff or programs of its own. The incumbent's achievements are the result of moral suasion and the careful selection of issues ? and sometimes a willingness to butt heads with the pols.
HEALTH
March 13, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Regina M. Benjamin wants to make America healthier, one community at a time. Born and raised in Daphne, Ala., she started practicing medicine in the rural shrimp-farming town of Bayou La Batre on Alabama's Gulf Coast in 1987 and founded a family-practice clinic there in 1990. Benjamin provided care to all comers, including patients without health insurance. Her clinic was destroyed three times in 10 years ? by Hurricane Georges in 1998, by Hurricane Katrina in 2005 and by a fire in 2006.
NEWS
November 24, 2010 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times
There's a lot to talk about when families get together around the Thanksgiving table -- and the U.S. surgeon general has one more topic to suggest. Surgeon Gen. Regina Benjamin is urging families to take advantage of the holiday gathering to discuss their medical histories and identify potential health risks. This South Florida Sun Sentinel story profiles the initiative and one family that thinks this is sound advice. "Your doctor may not do a complete family history," says Lisa Marton, whose medical history puts her at high risk for breast cancer.
HEALTH
March 13, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Regina M. Benjamin wants to make America healthier, one community at a time. Born and raised in Daphne, Ala., she started practicing medicine in the rural shrimp-farming town of Bayou La Batre on Alabama's Gulf Coast in 1987 and founded a family-practice clinic there in 1990. Benjamin provided care to all comers, including patients without health insurance. Her clinic was destroyed three times in 10 years ? by Hurricane Georges in 1998, by Hurricane Katrina in 2005 and by a fire in 2006.
OPINION
January 28, 2011 | By Henry I. Miller
Although some of the nation's healthcare issues are abstruse and vexing, others are relatively approachable. Many in this latter category fall within the province of the U.S. surgeon general. But the incumbent is nowhere to be found. The position of surgeon general is unusual in that it is considered prestigious but lacks virtually any budget, staff or programs of its own. The incumbent's achievements are the result of moral suasion and the careful selection of issues ? and sometimes a willingness to butt heads with the pols.
NATIONAL
July 20, 2009 | Richard Fausset
Like most everyone in this small, scruffy city of boat builders and fishermen, Sammy Duffy tends to rave about surgeon general nominee Regina Benjamin and all that she has done for the hard-working people here who labor without the safety net of health insurance.
OPINION
July 14, 2009
The news cameras cut away from the Senate hearings on Supreme Court nominee Sonia Sotomayor for just a few minutes, but it was enough time for history to be made at the other end of Pennsylvania Avenue as well. There, President Obama announced his nomination of another woman from an underrepresented minority who, like Sotomayor, understands grand public policy as an intellectual and as one who has lived it through personal experience.
NATIONAL
July 14, 2009 | Kristina Sherry
President Obama announced Monday that he would nominate Dr. Regina M. Benjamin -- a family physician who founded a health clinic in a small, shrimp-farming town in Alabama -- to be the nation's surgeon general. Benjamin in 1995 became the first black woman and the youngest doctor elected to the board of the American Medical Assn. Last year she received a MacArthur Foundation "genius" grant for treating patients in the Gulf Coast region regardless of their ability to pay.
NATIONAL
December 10, 2010 | By Peter Nicholas, Tribune Washington Bureau
White House victories are rare these days, but President Obama can claim solid progress in his lonely battle to quit smoking. The president has gone nine months without sneaking a cigarette, White House Press Secretary Robert Gibbs reported Thursday. Every day is a struggle and there's no guarantee the president won't light up tomorrow, it seems. Still, for a president who has been trying to quit for years, the nine-month hiatus is a welcome sign that he's breaking the addiction.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2011
SUNDAY It's time for "The 83rd Academy Awards. " Our favorite movie last year was that one about the one-eyed, one-armed boxer from the Ozarks who outgrows his toys, overcomes a speech impediment, and meets a lesbian couple and a ballerina on Facebook, only to discover it was all just a dream ? or was it? (ABC, 5:30 p.m.) Speaking of the Oscars, some of our nerdier friends are still perturbed that ├╝ber-nerd Woody Allen's 1977 comedy "Annie Hall" beat out "Star Wars" for best picture, scoring additional trophies for director, original screenplay and lead actress Diane Keaton.
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