Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRegina Carter
IN THE NEWS

Regina Carter

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2014 | By Chris Barton
A selection of jazz and jazz-adjacent shows head for Los Angeles in the coming days. Regina Carter at the Jazz Bakery Jazz violin isn't a crowded field, but Regina Carter remains a standout regardless. After exploring African music with the critically acclaimed "Reverse Thread" in 2010, Carter turns toward her roots in Americana and folk on her latest album, "Southern Comfort," and the results are just as arresting. Mingling swift, sawing runs with guitar and accordion, Carter delivers fresh takes on rootsy classics including "Hickory Wind," "Honky Tonkin'" and a funky, electronics-dusted "Trampin'.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2014 | By Chris Barton
A selection of jazz and jazz-adjacent shows head for Los Angeles in the coming days. Regina Carter at the Jazz Bakery Jazz violin isn't a crowded field, but Regina Carter remains a standout regardless. After exploring African music with the critically acclaimed "Reverse Thread" in 2010, Carter turns toward her roots in Americana and folk on her latest album, "Southern Comfort," and the results are just as arresting. Mingling swift, sawing runs with guitar and accordion, Carter delivers fresh takes on rootsy classics including "Hickory Wind," "Honky Tonkin'" and a funky, electronics-dusted "Trampin'.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 23, 2004 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
The violin's preeminence in classical music has not deterred jazz musicians from employing its brilliant resources for swinging instrumental music. Regina Carter, following in a line that includes Stuff Smith, Joe Venuti, Stephane Grappelli and Jean-Luc Ponty, is in the front row of the 21st century's slim but talented class of jazz violinists. Her performance Tuesday night at Catalina Bar & Grill displayed the skill and eclecticism of her music.
NEWS
January 11, 2007
Every generation seems to demand the presence of a new artist to prove once again that jazz can be played on the violin. And Regina Carter is a worthy descendant of such convincing jazz fiddlers as Stuff Smith, Joe Venuti and Stephane Grappelli. She is joined by the captivating vocalist Carla Cook in "A Sentimental Journey" -- a tour through the standards of the Great American Songbook. Regina Carter, Samueli Theatre, Orange County Performing Arts Center, 600 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 2001 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Like many teenagers, violinist Regina Carter had to keep a secret from her parents. No, it wasn't a boyfriend, a bad report card or an all-night party. In her case, the secret was an interest in jazz. "When it came to jazz, my mother said, 'Absolutely not!' " Carter said from New York City, where her neighbors are drummers Elvin Jones and Max Roach. "Mom was from the old school. She thought all jazz musicians were on drugs, that they had no money and no health insurance.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2006 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Violinist Regina Carter's performance Tuesday at the Jazz Bakery to open a six-night run revealed the growing extent of her continuing quest for creative discovery.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, Don Heckman is The Times' jazz writer
There's a virtual traffic jam on the stage of the Hollywood Bowl. A good half of the players in the Clayton-Hamilton Jazz Orchestra are lounging around their seats, doing their musician routines, trading jokes, noodling a few notes here and there, waiting for a full ensemble rehearsal to begin. Soundmen dart in and out, setting up a microphone, moving a speaker, as video cameramen adjust their equipment and photographers crouch to get precisely the right angle.
NEWS
January 11, 2007
Every generation seems to demand the presence of a new artist to prove once again that jazz can be played on the violin. And Regina Carter is a worthy descendant of such convincing jazz fiddlers as Stuff Smith, Joe Venuti and Stephane Grappelli. She is joined by the captivating vocalist Carla Cook in "A Sentimental Journey" -- a tour through the standards of the Great American Songbook. Regina Carter, Samueli Theatre, Orange County Performing Arts Center, 600 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2003
In Don Heckman's Jazz Spotlight, "Take a bow, players," he lists past jazz violinists Stephane Grappelli, Joe Venuti and Stuff Smith. He also mentions some of the newer ones such as Regina Carter and Jean Luc Ponty. I just wonder how he could not have mentioned Ray Nance (who played with Duke Ellington!) as one of the most influential and one of the best of the bunch. John Howard Los Angeles
NEWS
December 7, 1995 | JIM SCHAEFER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Regina Carter's house on the east side is a shrine to the old days. The rooms are filled with reminders of her past. Propped neatly on the living room floor, amid other Motown memorabilia, is a cracked, faded Marvin Gaye album cover, "Live at the London Palladium." In another room, collections of outdated issues of Ebony and Jet magazines clutter the place. Plastered on virtually every wall are photographs of Carter's family, their smiling faces long-ago frozen in eternal cheer.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2006 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Violinist Regina Carter's performance Tuesday at the Jazz Bakery to open a six-night run revealed the growing extent of her continuing quest for creative discovery.
NEWS
September 23, 2004 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
The violin's preeminence in classical music has not deterred jazz musicians from employing its brilliant resources for swinging instrumental music. Regina Carter, following in a line that includes Stuff Smith, Joe Venuti, Stephane Grappelli and Jean-Luc Ponty, is in the front row of the 21st century's slim but talented class of jazz violinists. Her performance Tuesday night at Catalina Bar & Grill displayed the skill and eclecticism of her music.
NEWS
May 8, 2003 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Violinist Regina Carter has been receiving a considerable promotional push lately for her encounter with Paganini's legendary Guarneri violin "the Cannon." Her performances with the remarkable instrument have tended to emphasize its unprecedented use by an African American female playing jazz, rather than the quality of the music itself.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2003
In Don Heckman's Jazz Spotlight, "Take a bow, players," he lists past jazz violinists Stephane Grappelli, Joe Venuti and Stuff Smith. He also mentions some of the newer ones such as Regina Carter and Jean Luc Ponty. I just wonder how he could not have mentioned Ray Nance (who played with Duke Ellington!) as one of the most influential and one of the best of the bunch. John Howard Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2001 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Every summer, the Jazz Bakery adds a special event to its busy, year-round schedule of jazz--an event that departs from the venue's warehouse-like location in the Helms Bakery building in favor of the airy, outdoor setting of the Ford Amphitheatre. On Friday night, this year's installment, "A Midsummer Night's Jazz," served up a delightful musical banquet via performances by Chilean-born singer Claudia Acuna and the duo of violinist Regina Carter and pianist Kenny Barron.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 2001 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Like many teenagers, violinist Regina Carter had to keep a secret from her parents. No, it wasn't a boyfriend, a bad report card or an all-night party. In her case, the secret was an interest in jazz. "When it came to jazz, my mother said, 'Absolutely not!' " Carter said from New York City, where her neighbors are drummers Elvin Jones and Max Roach. "Mom was from the old school. She thought all jazz musicians were on drugs, that they had no money and no health insurance.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
What do you do when you play an instrument that is usually categorized as "miscellaneous" in the jazz polls? When you're a jazz artist trying to carve a career with an ax that is one of the principal working tools of classical music? Violinist Regina Carter knows the answer: Find your own path.
NEWS
May 8, 2003 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Violinist Regina Carter has been receiving a considerable promotional push lately for her encounter with Paganini's legendary Guarneri violin "the Cannon." Her performances with the remarkable instrument have tended to emphasize its unprecedented use by an African American female playing jazz, rather than the quality of the music itself.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2000 | DON HECKMAN, Don Heckman is The Times' jazz writer
James Carter has been able to do almost anything he chooses with a saxophone since his very first recordings. He is fluent not just on alto, tenor and soprano, but on some of the instrument's more rarely heard manifestations--bass saxophone, for example--so there has never been any doubt about his virtuosic technical skills. There has, however, been some question regarding his capacity to find an artistic center, on recordings as well as in performance.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
What do you do when you play an instrument that is usually categorized as "miscellaneous" in the jazz polls? When you're a jazz artist trying to carve a career with an ax that is one of the principal working tools of classical music? Violinist Regina Carter knows the answer: Find your own path.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|