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Reginald F Lewis

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BUSINESS
January 20, 1993 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reginald F. Lewis, the Harvard-educated lawyer who gained fame during the 1980s takeover craze and built the nation's largest black-owned business, died of a cerebral hemorrhage Tuesday after a short battle with brain cancer. The quick decline of the chairman and chief executive of TLC Beatrice International Holdings, who turned 50 last month, came as a shock to Lewis' friends and colleagues.
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BUSINESS
February 7, 1993
No big deal. I'll just purchase the Los Angeles Times as usual, sit back, relax and scan the Business section. My eyes hopscotch lightly over the headlines: IBM reported losses, Wells Fargo's stock gains, Beatrice chief Reginald F. Lewis dies at 50, Chrysler's red ink . . . . Nothing out of the ordinary. And then it hits me. In disbelief, I reread the headline: "Beatrice Chief Reginald F. Lewis Dies" (Jan. 20). Damn! Always the good ones. A hero of mine is no longer with us, but I feel him smiling from investors' heaven.
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BUSINESS
August 11, 1987 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., Times Staff Writer
A little-known investment firm founded just four years ago is suddenly poised to become far-and-away the nation's largest black-owned business with plans to purchase a controlling interest in Beatrice Cos.' international foods division. The firm, TLC Group LP of New York, along with the New York investment banking firm of Drexel Burnham Lambert, announced plans Sunday to buy the Beatrice division for $985 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1993
Reginald F. Lewis, the Wall Street attorney turned deal maker who amassed a fortune estimated at $400 million before his death last week from brain cancer, lived the American dream. In a span of two decades, he rose from middle class to mega-millionaire. Such a record of achievement, though spectacular, was not considered unthinkable for this stubborn Harvard-trained lawyer, who had sizable ambition and the skills to match.
BUSINESS
September 13, 1989 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., Times Staff Writer
A lawsuit by Crowthers McCall Pattern against New York investor Reginald F. Lewis, alleging fraud in the sale of the home sewing concern, may signal an increase in such litigation by disgruntled buyers seeking compensation for highly leveraged buyouts gone sour, experts say.
BUSINESS
October 28, 1988 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., Times Staff Writer
The mention of Wall Street's recent mania for food companies brings a knowing smile from Reginald F. Lewis, chairman of the New York investment firm TLC Group. It was, after all, Lewis who in August, 1987, agreed to buy the international foods division of the Beatrice Cos. and in one complicated $985-million deal, catapulted from a little-known Baltimore lawyer and aspiring venture capitalist to what one newspaper called "the most influential black businessman in America."
BUSINESS
January 19, 1993 | AMY HARMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reginald Lewis, chairman of TLC Beatrice International Holdings, the nation's largest black-owned business, has been hospitalized with brain cancer and is in a coma, the company said Monday. Lewis' brother and the company's vice chairman, Jean S. Fugett Jr., was named last week to head a new office of the chairman to run the New York-based food processing and distribution firm during Lewis' illness, the company said.
BUSINESS
February 7, 1993
No big deal. I'll just purchase the Los Angeles Times as usual, sit back, relax and scan the Business section. My eyes hopscotch lightly over the headlines: IBM reported losses, Wells Fargo's stock gains, Beatrice chief Reginald F. Lewis dies at 50, Chrysler's red ink . . . . Nothing out of the ordinary. And then it hits me. In disbelief, I reread the headline: "Beatrice Chief Reginald F. Lewis Dies" (Jan. 20). Damn! Always the good ones. A hero of mine is no longer with us, but I feel him smiling from investors' heaven.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1993
Reginald F. Lewis, the Wall Street attorney turned deal maker who amassed a fortune estimated at $400 million before his death last week from brain cancer, lived the American dream. In a span of two decades, he rose from middle class to mega-millionaire. Such a record of achievement, though spectacular, was not considered unthinkable for this stubborn Harvard-trained lawyer, who had sizable ambition and the skills to match.
BUSINESS
January 20, 1993 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reginald F. Lewis, the Harvard-educated lawyer who gained fame during the 1980s takeover craze and built the nation's largest black-owned business, died of a cerebral hemorrhage Tuesday after a short battle with brain cancer. The quick decline of the chairman and chief executive of TLC Beatrice International Holdings, who turned 50 last month, came as a shock to Lewis' friends and colleagues.
BUSINESS
January 19, 1993 | AMY HARMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reginald Lewis, chairman of TLC Beatrice International Holdings, the nation's largest black-owned business, has been hospitalized with brain cancer and is in a coma, the company said Monday. Lewis' brother and the company's vice chairman, Jean S. Fugett Jr., was named last week to head a new office of the chairman to run the New York-based food processing and distribution firm during Lewis' illness, the company said.
BUSINESS
September 13, 1989 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., Times Staff Writer
A lawsuit by Crowthers McCall Pattern against New York investor Reginald F. Lewis, alleging fraud in the sale of the home sewing concern, may signal an increase in such litigation by disgruntled buyers seeking compensation for highly leveraged buyouts gone sour, experts say.
BUSINESS
October 28, 1988 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., Times Staff Writer
The mention of Wall Street's recent mania for food companies brings a knowing smile from Reginald F. Lewis, chairman of the New York investment firm TLC Group. It was, after all, Lewis who in August, 1987, agreed to buy the international foods division of the Beatrice Cos. and in one complicated $985-million deal, catapulted from a little-known Baltimore lawyer and aspiring venture capitalist to what one newspaper called "the most influential black businessman in America."
BUSINESS
August 11, 1987 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., Times Staff Writer
A little-known investment firm founded just four years ago is suddenly poised to become far-and-away the nation's largest black-owned business with plans to purchase a controlling interest in Beatrice Cos.' international foods division. The firm, TLC Group LP of New York, along with the New York investment banking firm of Drexel Burnham Lambert, announced plans Sunday to buy the Beatrice division for $985 million.
BUSINESS
March 22, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
TLC Beatrice Plans Cost Cutting: The nation's largest black-owned business has halved its New York headquarters staff and sold the corporate jet. The food conglomerate also announced that minority shareholders have abandoned their efforts for a common stock offering of the privately owned company and are satisfied that management is now ensuring Beatrice's health. It was the first public disclosure of the steps undertaken by management since Loida Lewis, widow of founder Reginald F.
NEWS
July 12, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Benjamin F. Chavis Jr., the newly installed executive director of the NAACP, pledged to revitalize the 84-year-old civil rights organization with new spirit and new money. And he said the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, hobbled in the past by infighting, has unified. "This time there's no fighting, no division," Chavis said at the opening of the group's national convention in Indianapolis. "Our ranks are together."
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