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Reginald O Denny

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December 24, 1992 | BOB SIPCHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wherever he goes, people wonder if he's really the man they saw dragged from his truck April 29 and beaten so severely that few thought he would live. "Here, give me your hand," says Reginald O. Denny. He guides a visitor's fingers from where his blond-brown hair meets his forehead down into a saucer-sized crater and back out onto his cheek. "I tell people, the real Reginald Denny has half his skull missing," he says, maintaining a serious stare for a split second before smiling.
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NEWS
April 22, 2002 | STEPHANIE CHAVEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bobby Green is sitting on his couch in suburban Rialto, talking about the night 10 years ago that he saved a man's life, a moment that made him a hero to most and a traitor to others. Back then, in the first hours of the Los Angeles riots, Green was sitting on another couch, this one in South-Central Los Angeles. He was watching a black man on live TV smash a brick, then another brick, into the head of a white truck driver, who lay writhing on the pavement.
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NEWS
May 13, 1992 | LOUIS SAHAGUN and STEPHANIE CHAVEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
At the intersection of Florence and Normandie, where television cameras caught the violent early moments of the Los Angeles riots, the 8-Trey Gangster Crips have established their stronghold. From this corner, where trucker Reginald O. Denny was brutally beaten, the loose affiliation of about 350 gang members claims an impoverished territory that runs roughly from Gage Avenue on the North to Manchester Avenue on the South and from Van Ness Avenue on the West to Vermont Avenue on the East.
NEWS
October 8, 1996
A judge dismissed lawsuits filed by truck driver Reginald O. Denny and other victims of the 1992 riots who charged that police abandoned South-Central Los Angeles at the height of the violence. The victims failed to show "discriminatory intent" by the city and the Los Angeles Police Department when officers withdrew from the area of Florence and Normandy avenues, according to the decision released Monday. U.S. District Judge W. Matthew Byrne Jr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1993 | From Associated Press
A Chinese immigrant described through an interpreter Tuesday how he became one of the first victims of the 1992 riots when he was dragged from his car, beaten and robbed. Choi Sai-Choi, who came to the United States four years ago, said he was beaten at Florence and Normandie avenues in South-Central Los Angeles, the same intersection where trucker Reginald O. Denny was later attacked.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1992
A defense lawyer in the Reginald O. Denny beating case may be allowed to seek removal of the trial judge unless prosecutors or the court can persuade appellate jurists otherwise, it was announced Thursday. A one-page ruling issued by the 2nd District Court of Appeal states that "the court is considering the issuance of a peremptory writ . . . (and) any opposition must be filed within five court days."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 1993
The trial of two men accused of attempting to kill trucker Reginald O. Denny was recessed Monday after a juror called in complaining of severe sinus problems. Superior Court Judge John W. Ouderkirk decided against seating an alternate juror because the ill panelist said he should be able to return today. Damian Monroe Williams, 20, and Henry Keith Watson, 29, are also charged with assaulting or robbing seven other people at Florence and Normandie avenues as rioting broke out last year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1993
A questionnaire to screen potential jurors for the trial of two men accused of beating trucker Reginald O. Denny during last year's riots was approved by attorneys for both sides Friday. Superior Court Judge John W. Ouderkirk also bumped the trial opening for Damian M. Williams and Henry K. Watson from Monday to Wednesday, when jury selection will begin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1992
Gary A. Williams, accused of attempting to rob truck driver Reginald O. Denny on April 29 at Florence and Normandie avenues, will appear in court for a preliminary hearing in three weeks, lawyers agreed Tuesday. Prosecutors say Williams rifled through Denny's pockets as the bleeding truck driver lay on the pavement after his beating, which was aired live on television during the opening hours of the Los Angeles riots.
NEWS
October 8, 1996
A judge dismissed lawsuits filed by truck driver Reginald O. Denny and other victims of the 1992 riots who charged that police abandoned South-Central Los Angeles at the height of the violence. The victims failed to show "discriminatory intent" by the city and the Los Angeles Police Department when officers withdrew from the area of Florence and Normandy avenues, according to the decision released Monday. U.S. District Judge W. Matthew Byrne Jr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1996
A state appeals court Tuesday unanimously upheld the 1993 mayhem and assault convictions of one of the primary assailants of truck driver Reginald O. Denny, whose televised beating came to symbolize the fury of the 1992 Los Angeles riots. The three-judge panel rejected the claims of Damian Monroe Williams that the court prejudiced his case by, among other things, limiting his ability to cross-examine some witnesses and dismissing an African American juror.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1994
Damian Williams, serving a 10-year sentence in connection with the Reginald O. Denny beating, took the stand briefly Monday in the trial of the man accused of shooting at the trucker's big rig. Deputy Dist. Atty. Kevin McCormick called Williams, 21, as a prosecution witness in the trial of Lance Parker. Williams supposedly implicated Parker in a tape-recorded confession to police.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1994 | From Staff and Wire Reports
A Los Angeles Superior Court judge refused Monday to dismiss a lawsuit alleging that the city violated the civil rights of trucker Reginald O. Denny and two other victims by pulling police forces out of a neighborhood where rioting erupted on April 29, 1992, leaving citizens at the mercy of their assailants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1994 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
A federal judge refused Monday to dismiss a lawsuit against the city of Los Angeles by trucker Reginald O. Denny and three other 1992 riot victims, clearing the way for a trial that may begin later this year. Denny, Wanda Harris, Takao Hirata and Fidel Lopez contend that Los Angeles police left them at the mercy of their assailants in the neighborhood surrounding Florence and Normandie avenues during the early stages of the riot because the area is predominantly black.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1994 | SCOTT HARRIS
A Los Angeles jury decided that smashing Reginald Denny's skull with a brick did not constitute assault with a deadly weapon . . . --Columnist George Will in NewsweekDec. 17, 1993 Outrageous, isn't it? You saw the video. You saw Damian Williams heave the brick that smashed Reginald Denny's skull. You saw Williams' victory dance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1993 | EDWARD J. BOYER and ANDREA FORD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The causes of the Los Angeles riots are irrelevant to the sentence that should be imposed on Damian Monroe Williams for his role in the beating of Reginald O. Denny, a judge ruled Wednesday, saying, "I don't know and I don't care" about the reasons that other rioters participated in the violence. Attorney Edi M.O. Faal, who represents Williams, asked Superior Court Judge John W. Ouderkirk to clarify his comment. "You don't care about what?" Faal asked.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1992
Lawyers for Damian Monroe Williams, who is charged with attempting to murder truck driver Reginald O. Denny during the riots last spring, asked a judge Thursday to dismiss the case. In a motion filed in Superior Court, Williams' new lawyers said that the firm that represented Williams during his preliminary hearing intentionally sabotaged his defense by allowing a statement that Williams made to police to be played. Williams says in that tape-recorded statement that he hit Denny with a rock.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1993
Defense attorneys in the Reginald O. Denny beating trial said Wednesday that a 12-member jury could be impaneled as early as today, and the task of seating six alternate jurors could begin early next week. Prosecutors exhausted their peremptory challenges, which allow them to remove jurors without stating a cause. They will only be granted additional challenges if the defense uses its remaining four and decides to use any of its 10 supplemental challenges.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1993 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Henry Keith Watson apologized on a videotaping of the Phil Donahue talk show Monday for his role in the beating of Reginald O. Denny, but the predominantly white audience did not appear to be satisfied. Denny and Watson met for what was said to be the first time on national television during an emotional session that will air in two parts today and Wednesday on KNBC-TV.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1993 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About 40 angry black residents gathered outside a Palmdale church Tuesday to demand an apology from a newspaper that published an editorial cartoon depicting a black man being lynched by the Ku Klux Klan. Lynda Thompson Taylor, president of the Antelope Valley branch of the NAACP, described the cartoon, published Oct. 27 in the Antelope Valley Press, as a "vulgar attack on people of color." "We feel this showed a lack of sensitivity to our children, who deserve better," she said.
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