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Reginald Zachary

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 1992 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mary-Linn Hughes was all set to create a personal installation about intimacy and the like when something happened to topple her well-laid plans: A riot. "I had to do something (in response), you know?" said Hughes, a Huntington Beach artist who scrapped her first idea, opting instead for a swiftly assembled work addressing Los Angeles' recent violence. It's titled "They" and is on view through July 18 at Beyond Baroque in Venice.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 1992 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mary-Linn Hughes was all set to create a personal installation about intimacy and the like when something happened to topple her well-laid plans: A riot. "I had to do something (in response), you know?" said Hughes, a Huntington Beach artist who scrapped her first idea, opting instead for a swiftly assembled work addressing Los Angeles' recent violence. It's titled "They" and is on view through July 18 at Beyond Baroque in Venice.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1991 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than two dozen Orange County artists and arts organizations are seeking a total of more than $1 million in California Arts Council grants this year. Because of the large number of arts groups seeking state money, those that do win CAC grants typically receive half or less of the funds applied for. The Orange County applicants and the amounts they requested: LITERATURE Pacific Writers Press, amount not available Laguna Poets, $2,105. MUSIC PERFORMING GROUPS Opera Pacific, $151,568.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 1992 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Their faces are featureless, seen only in silhouette. They could be white or black, straight or gay, rich or poor. They have no specific identity; they embrace every identity. "We wanted to really represent all the different people who have been affected by AIDS and HIV," said artist Mary-Linn Hughes, explaining the images in a 50-by-12-foot mural she and another artist have painted near Culver City.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 1991 | SHAUNA SNOW
A mural believed to be the first dealing with the subject of AIDS will be dedicated next Sunday at the Minority AIDS Project at 5149 W. Jefferson Blvd. The mural, designed and painted by artists Mary-Linn Hughes and Reginald Zachary, reaches out with the message "Love is for everyone" and portrays a broad range of people--gay and straight, men, women and children of various races--affected with AIDS and the human immunodeficiency virus that causes the disease. The 2 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 1992 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Their faces are featureless, seen only in silhouette. They could be white or black, straight or gay, rich or poor. They have no specific identity; they embrace every identity. "We wanted to really represent all the different people who have been affected by AIDS and HIV," said artist Mary-Linn Hughes, explaining the images in a 50-by-12-foot mural she and another artist have painted near Culver City.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1992 | SHAUNA SNOW
"Passage: A Public Art Proposal for Chinatown," designed by four Chinese-American artists hoping to bring more contemporary art to Chinatown, is on exhibit at Santa Monica's Merging One Gallery through July 30. The project's highlight is Carol Nye's plan for black-and-white bilingual photo billboards featuring pioneering Chinese immigrant women.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 1992 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Karwin thinks personal identities should be determined less by ethnicity or culture than by individuals' unique, vastly differing life experiences. A graduate student at Cal State Fullerton, he has organized "Heritage Regained," an exhibit exploring the topic. On view through Dec. 13 at the university's Main Art Gallery, it contains three installations by five Southern California artists.
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