Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRegional Clean Air Incentives Market
IN THE NEWS

Regional Clean Air Incentives Market

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
June 30, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Union Carbide Corp. Sells Smog Credits: The company's plant in Torrance became the first major participant in the state's controversial Regional Clean Air Incentives Market program, under which companies are given pollution credits that may be sold. State officials said the plant sold 3.4 million credits--$1.2-million worth--last week to Anchor Glass Container Corp., a private company in Huntington Park. A credit gives the owner the right to emit a pound of nitrogen oxide.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
May 28, 2001 | MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Factory owner Bill Gorman thought he'd been hit with everything the energy crisis had to throw at him: soaring natural gas bills, skyrocketing electricity prices and the ever-present threat of blackouts. Then he went shopping for pollution credits to meet emissions limits on his Vernon rendering plant. Electricity providers had snapped up so many of them to keep old plants running that Gorman found himself priced out of the pollution market.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
April 14, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Smog-Credit Market Goes Electronic: The Regional Clean Air Incentives Market, or RECLAIM, which allows trading in air-pollution credits in the four-county region of the South Coast Air Quality Management District, was converted to a new electronic system on the Internet designed by the California Institute of Technology and the Pacific Stock Exchange. Credits to emit certain levels of pollution are issued by the district.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2001 | GARY POLAKOVIC, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
It was supposed to be a revolutionary way to clean up the environment, a business-friendly strategy to slash industrial emissions without the heavy hand of government. But the Southland's market basket experiment has been a serious disappointment. The Regional Clean Air Incentives Market, or RECLAIM, has fallen well short of expectations.
NEWS
September 9, 1993 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Concerned that Southern California's smoggy air will remain dirty, or perhaps even get worse in the next few years, leading clean air activists on Wednesday announced their opposition to the region's controversial pollution exchange proposal. The announcement by the Natural Resources Defense Council, the Coalition for Clean Air and the American Lung Assn. heats up an already fervent battle that is dividing the Southland's business community.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1993 | RICHARD D. FARMAN, Richard D. Farman is chief executive officer of the Gas Co.
After months of rule revisions and meetings with the South Coast Air Quality Management District's staff, the debate between RECLAIM proponents and opponents is expected to come to a head Friday. That is when the district's governing board will decide the fate of the long-delayed emissions trading program---a decision that will likely have a dramatic impact on Southern California's economy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 1993 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
On a spring day in 1989, the Southland's powerful smog-fighting agency launched a bold effort that was supposed to accomplish what no one had dared promise before: making the nation's foulest air safe to breathe. At the time, the South Coast Air Quality Management District was ready to embark on more than 100 anti-smog rules, from the mundane to the futuristic, outlined in its 20-year blueprint for blue skies. But last year, the program was suspended.
BUSINESS
March 24, 1992 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN
Katy Wolf seems to be an indulgent sort. If the economists want to portray the South Coast Air Quality Management District's proposed "smog market" as an exercise in pure supply and demand, who is she to rain on their parade? If they want to believe that as early as a year from now, the invisible hand of the marketplace will have completely replaced the existing "command and control" regulatory system as the mechanism for reducing air pollution in the Los Angeles Basin, she can live with that.
NEWS
September 10, 1993 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
In a bruising, daylong battle of accolades and rebukes Thursday, a proposal to replace the Southland's traditional approach of fighting smog with a novel pollution-trading strategy was called everything from "world-class" to "unworkable" and "frightening."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1993 | DOUGLAS JEFFE, Douglas Jeffe is vice chairman of the L.A. Taxpayers Assn.
The South Coast Air Quality Management District Board will decide on Friday whether to adopt the Regional Clean Air Incentives Market (RECLAIM) program, which is designed to give industry the flexibility to use better and cheaper ways to reduce air emissions. By popular demand, here are the Top 10 reasons RECLAIM should be approved: 10) It's got such a great acronym. It's catchy and uplifting. And if any place needs reclaiming these days, it's Southern California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1997 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
In a creative expansion of its groundbreaking stock exchange for smog, the Southland's air quality board Friday approved a program allowing investors to clean up small sources, such as household water heaters and furnaces, in exchange for pollution credits that can be sold on the open market.
NEWS
January 13, 1996 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
The Southern California air quality board voted unanimously Friday to mothball an expanded version of its innovative pollution trading market, leaving it without a strategy for complying fully with federal clean air rules. The move marks the latest in a series of conciliatory gestures by the South Coast Air Quality Management District board toward a business community that is newly emboldened by the anti-regulatory zeal of the Republican-controlled state Assembly.
BUSINESS
April 14, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Smog-Credit Market Goes Electronic: The Regional Clean Air Incentives Market, or RECLAIM, which allows trading in air-pollution credits in the four-county region of the South Coast Air Quality Management District, was converted to a new electronic system on the Internet designed by the California Institute of Technology and the Pacific Stock Exchange. Credits to emit certain levels of pollution are issued by the district.
BUSINESS
June 30, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Union Carbide Corp. Sells Smog Credits: The company's plant in Torrance became the first major participant in the state's controversial Regional Clean Air Incentives Market program, under which companies are given pollution credits that may be sold. State officials said the plant sold 3.4 million credits--$1.2-million worth--last week to Anchor Glass Container Corp., a private company in Huntington Park. A credit gives the owner the right to emit a pound of nitrogen oxide.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1993 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
An ounce of gold fetches nearly $400, pork bellies sell for half a dollar a pound and a bushel of soybeans goes for $7 on the open market. But how much will a company pay for the right to emit a ton of pollution into the nation's filthiest air? That question--the focus of worldwide curiosity among industrial leaders and pollution regulators--soon will be answered as Southern California's smog market debuts on New Year's Day.
NEWS
December 28, 1993 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
An ounce of gold fetches nearly $400, pork bellies sell for half a dollar a pound and a bushel of soybeans goes for $7 on the open market. But how much will a company pay for the right to emit a ton of pollution into the nation's filthiest air? That question--the focus of worldwide curiosity among industrial leaders and pollution regulators--soon will be answered as Southern California's smog market debuts on New Year's Day.
NEWS
March 6, 1992 | LARRY B. STAMMER and JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Signaling a dramatic new direction in the decades-long war on smog, the South Coast Air Quality Management District on Thursday ordered its staff to prepare plans for a revolutionary new trading market in pollution rights. The 8-1 vote Thursday night came after an overflow public hearing that lasted six hours. The lone dissenting vote was cast by Larry Berg, a political science professor at USC who was appointed to the district board by Assembly Speaker Willie Brown.
NEWS
August 17, 1993 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
More than two dozen major business groups in Southern California have launched a campaign against an ambitious proposal to fight smog by trading pollution credits, contending it will substantially raise the cost of cleaning the air rather than lower it as promised. The barrage of criticism, led by the Gas Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1993 | RICHARD D. FARMAN, Richard D. Farman is chief executive officer of the Gas Co.
After months of rule revisions and meetings with the South Coast Air Quality Management District's staff, the debate between RECLAIM proponents and opponents is expected to come to a head Friday. That is when the district's governing board will decide the fate of the long-delayed emissions trading program---a decision that will likely have a dramatic impact on Southern California's economy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1993 | DOUGLAS JEFFE, Douglas Jeffe is vice chairman of the L.A. Taxpayers Assn.
The South Coast Air Quality Management District Board will decide on Friday whether to adopt the Regional Clean Air Incentives Market (RECLAIM) program, which is designed to give industry the flexibility to use better and cheaper ways to reduce air emissions. By popular demand, here are the Top 10 reasons RECLAIM should be approved: 10) It's got such a great acronym. It's catchy and uplifting. And if any place needs reclaiming these days, it's Southern California.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|