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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1992 | BILL BILLITER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A charitable donation of $150,000 from the George Hoag Family Foundation will keep the Regional Poison Control Center open for at least three more months, officials announced Tuesday. The center, which is at UCI Medical Center, was originally scheduled to close this month because of a lack of funding. "This (extension) could mean the saving of a child's life," said Fran Tardiff, a spokeswoman for UCI Medical Center.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
In a move that health officials fear will strain already overburdened emergency medical services and lead to potentially fatal delays, UC Irvine Medical Center announced that its poison-control hot line will close in 30 days. "This is very bad news," said Dr. Philip Edelman, medical director of the Regional Poison Control Center, which receives about 51,000 calls a year from Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, Inyo and Mono counties.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
In a move that health officials fear will strain already overburdened emergency medical services and lead to potentially fatal delays, UC Irvine Medical Center announced that its poison-control hot line will close in 30 days. "This is very bad news," said Dr. Philip Edelman, medical director of the Regional Poison Control Center, which receives about 51,000 calls a year from Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, Inyo and Mono counties.
NEWS
April 8, 1992 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move that health officials fear will strain already overburdened emergency medical services and lead to potentially fatal delays, UCI Medical Center announced Tuesday that Orange County's only poison-control hot line will close in 30 days. "This is very bad news," said Dr. Philip Edelman, medical director of the Regional Poison Control Center, which receives about 51,000 calls a year from Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, Inyo and Mono counties.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 1991 | CLAIRE SPIEGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A threatened shutdown of Los Angeles' financially-strapped Regional Poison Control Center was averted Wednesday when county officials said they will take over its operation from the Los Angeles County Medical Assn. The association disclosed last month that it might have to discontinue the service due to a drop in private contributions and cutbacks in state subsidies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1992 | BILL BILLITER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A charitable donation of $150,000 from the George Hoag Family Foundation will keep the Regional Poison Control Center open for at least three more months, officials announced Tuesday. The center, which is at UCI Medical Center, was originally scheduled to close this month because of a lack of funding. "This (extension) could mean the saving of a child's life," said Fran Tardiff, a spokeswoman for UCI Medical Center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1991
Los Angeles County supervisors on Tuesday asked county budget and health officials to explore possible public and private funding to aid the financially strapped Regional Poison Control Center, run as a public service by the Los Angeles County Medical Assn. The association said last week that without additional funds, the center will close by year's end.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1992
The Los Angeles Regional Poison Control Center, threatened by a severe funding shortfall last year, has been saved from closure. It has relocated to Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center to become part of the public hospital's existing drug information center for medical professionals. The combined service, called the Los Angeles Regional Drug and Poison Information Center, serves the public and professionals on its telephone hot lines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1989
A leak of toxic liquid at a North Hollywood medical laboratory injured 23 people Monday and forced the evacuation of 200 employees, authorities said. Several dozen firefighters, a hazardous-materials team and three ambulances were dispatched to the Kaiser Permanente medical laboratory in the 10000 block of Magnolia Boulevard about 10:20 a.m. after employees reported the leak, said Los Angeles Fire Department spokesman Greg Acevedo.
NEWS
April 8, 1992 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move that health officials fear will strain already overburdened emergency medical services and lead to potentially fatal delays, UCI Medical Center announced Tuesday that Orange County's only poison-control hot line will close in 30 days. "This is very bad news," said Dr. Philip Edelman, medical director of the Regional Poison Control Center, which receives about 51,000 calls a year from Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, Inyo and Mono counties.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 1991 | CLAIRE SPIEGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A threatened shutdown of Los Angeles' financially-strapped Regional Poison Control Center was averted Wednesday when county officials said they will take over its operation from the Los Angeles County Medical Assn. The association disclosed last month that it might have to discontinue the service due to a drop in private contributions and cutbacks in state subsidies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 1992
Once again the Regional Poison Control Center at UCI Medical Center has been granted a last-minute reprieve from shutting down and cutting off the 51,000 emergency callers from four counties who call each year seeking its expert emergency help. The center was first scheduled to close May 8 after UCI officials decided that they could no longer afford the $500,000 it was costing them to subsidize the operation. That was in addition to $300,000 that the state provides.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1995
The founding benefactor of Hoag Memorial Hospital Presbyterian died Thursday night at the medical center he helped build in the early 1950s, hospital officials said. George G. Hoag II, 77, of Newport Beach was having dinner with his wife, Patty, when he suffered a cardiac arrest, said Stacey Brussard, a hospital spokeswoman. Paramedics took him to Hoag Hospital, where he died about 7 p.m. Hoag and his parents founded the George Hoag Family Foundation, which was named after his father.
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