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Regulation

BUSINESS
October 17, 2011 | By Jim Puzzanghera, Los Angeles Times
The agreement reached between the wireless industry and federal regulators to rein in cellphone bill shock sounds good for customers, but it has a potential drawback: It's voluntary. Consumer advocates who support the self-regulation plan nevertheless worry that the new standards to avoid sudden and unexpected spikes in cellphone bills may end up being largely ignored, as companies in many industries have done with plans for voluntary guidelines. Attempts at self-regulation to protect online privacy, for instance, have fallen woefully short, said Mark Cooper, director of research for the Consumer Federation of America.
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OPINION
June 17, 2008
Today's question : Does the Food and Drug Administration have too much regulatory power or not enough? Paul Roberts and Jacob Grier debate the new food economy . Yesterday, they discussed food panics . Later this week, they'll cover food shortages and other topics. Milton, thou shouldst be living at this hour Point: Jacob Grier "I blame Milton Friedman," Paul Krugman wrote in a column about America’s food safety problems last year, perversely blaming the late free-market economist for the failures of government regulation.
BUSINESS
September 7, 2011 | Michael Hiltzik
It's tough to admit, but I made a big mistake. I put all my eggs in one basket, and that basket was Time Warner Cable. As a result, when the company's system went down last week, my family lost not only all our television service, but our Internet connection and home telephones too. This may be the 21st century, but Chez Hiltzik was reduced to a dark uncivilized island, bereft of all communication with the outside world. No Netflix. No "Curb Your Enthusiasm. " No email.
BUSINESS
October 30, 2009 | Jim Puzzanghera
Recently unveiled legislation that seeks to avert the risk created by complex financial firms that are too big to fail might itself be too broad and complicated to survive without significant changes. The 253-page bill is one of the most controversial provisions of the Obama administration's overhaul of financial regulations because it directly addresses the future of government bailouts. The legislation drafted by the Treasury Department and Rep. Barney Frank (D-Mass.), chairman of the House Financial Services Committee, would give federal officials power to regulate, seize and dismantle large financial firms whose failure would pose a risk to the economy.
NATIONAL
February 22, 2013 | By David Horsey
Republicans make the claim that their party represents the concerns of average, hard-working, family-centered Americans. It is a curious claim, given that their party unfailingly opposes any measure that gives those average Americans a break.  Average Americans struggle to pay for their kids' college tuitions. Their incomes have stagnated. They have lost jobs. They have been screwed over by mortgage companies and banks. They have seen their 401(k) retirement savings decimated and pensions disappear.
NEWS
March 19, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
Emotional regulation -- the ability to take negative feelings and recognize, accept and channel them properly -- is an Achilles' heel for many people, but especially for those with anxiety-related disorders, eating disorders and some personality disorders. It can take years of psychotherapy to strengthen one's powers of emotional regulation. Or, says a new study, it might take a few weeks of brain training aimed at strengthening one's short-term memory. It turns out that the brain circuitry involved in emotional regulation  largely overlaps with the network of brain structures that govern short-term (or working)
NATIONAL
April 13, 2010 | By Noam N. Levey
Public outrage over double-digit rate hikes for health insurance may have helped push President Obama's healthcare overhaul across the finish line, but the new law does not give regulators the power to block similar increases in the future. And now, with some major companies already moving to boost premiums and others poised to follow suit, millions of Americans may feel an unexpected jolt in the pocketbook. Although Democrats promised greater consumer protection, the overhaul does not give the federal government broad regulatory power to prevent increases.
NATIONAL
August 22, 2008 | Rob Stein, Washington Post
The Bush administration Thursday announced plans to implement a controversial regulation designed to protect antiabortion healthcare workers from being required to deliver services against their personal beliefs. The rule empowers federal health officials to pull funding from more than 584,000 hospitals, clinics, health plans, doctors' offices and other entities that do not accommodate employees who refuse to participate in care they find objectionable on personal, moral or religious grounds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1987
Re: "Reading Reagan's Rights" (Editorial Pages, July 3): Surely you jest if you are suggesting or implying that James Madison and the Federalists would feel at home in today's unfathomable maze of bureaucratic regulation. They were addressing the critical issue of their day, which was the lack of any focus or control which would truly define the newly independent nation as just that--a nation. Common currency, taxation for defense and public welfare, ground rules for interstate commerce, and means to pay off the public debt were areas of need in search of a solution which would better define the thirteen colonies as a nation.
OPINION
August 24, 2003
Re "The System Needs Work," editorial, Aug. 19: Isn't this an interesting state of affairs. It seems that the best way to improve business profitability in California and prevent companies from fleeing is to use the state government to establish a regulated market with the intent of capping payouts to workers' compensation claims. Huh? Government regulation? Begged for by businesses? I guess big government and high regulation and market controls are all not so bad. But if bureaucratic regulation is so necessary to control the costs paid out by businesses toward health coverage for citizens, why is the same so evil when applied toward controlling how much citizens pay businesses for energy?
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