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BUSINESS
January 7, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez
The Federal Trade Commission on Tuesday cracked down on Sensa Products, an El Segundo company that sells a weight-loss powder that users sprinkle on food to help curb their appetite. The powder, which is marketed as activating the part of the brain that helps control appetite, is said to make users feel fuller faster so they eat less. Federal regulators, however, weren't buying the pitch. Sensa Products now has to return $26.5 million to consumers who bought its product because the company used faulty science in its marketing to mislead consumers, the FTC said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
April 27, 2014 | By Lance Pugmire
DALLAS - Nick Bonino has been a part of 28 comeback wins with the Ducks this season. Sunday night was the steepest - and most significant - yet. Bonino lifted the Ducks to a 5-4 overtime victory over the Dallas Stars as top-seeded Anaheim clinched a demanding first-round Western Conference playoff series, four games to two Bonino's goal, 2 minutes 47 seconds into sudden death, capped a rally from a two-goal deficit in the final 130 seconds of...
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BUSINESS
November 15, 2010
Here are some examples of recent lobbyist meetings with federal regulators, as reported on the agency websites: Citigroup: Aug 18 meeting at the Federal Reserve: Four Citi employees "raised concerns" with new derivatives legislation and explained "the importance of retaining their ability to hedge across markets. " Center on Executive Compensation: Aug 19 meeting at the Securities and Exchange Commission: The head of the industry-sponsored center presented material indicating that a new rule forcing companies to release information on executive pay "imposes substantial, costly and counterproductive regulatory burdens on employers at a time when growing the economy and encouraging job growth are top priorities.
BUSINESS
April 25, 2014 | By Shan Li and Lalita Clozel
A new federal proposal to regulate electronic cigarettes has Patrick Sanchez pondering the future of the fledgling industry. Sanchez is the owner of Vapegoat, a Highland Park e-cigarette shop that doubles as an art gallery. On a normal night, customers kick back on his comfy couches, surrounded by brick walls hung with Salvador Dali-esque paintings, and try out new e-cig flavors. Since opening in September, Sanchez said, business has boomed as more smokers discovered the battery-operated devices, which heat liquids that usually contain nicotine to create a vapor that can be inhaled.
BUSINESS
December 10, 2013 | By Andrew Tangel and Jim Puzzanghera
Three of the nation's top regulatory agencies adopted the final version of a rule aimed at preventing banks from taking risky bets that supporters argued could endanger the financial system. The Federal Reserve, Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. and Securities and Exchange Commission voted Tuesday to approve the Volcker Rule, the centerpiece of the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial overhaul. The goal of the rule is to prevent the nation's largest lending institutions from taking speculative bets with their own money and taxpayer-backed deposits.
SCIENCE
April 11, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall
California needs to strengthen regulation of hydraulic fracturing, according to a UC Berkeley Law School report that identified a number of shortcomings in state oversight of the controversial practice.    Known as fracking, the technique involves the high-pressure injection of chemical-laced fluids into the ground to crack rock formations and extract oil and gas. Although not new to California, the practice has come under increasing scrutiny recently...
BUSINESS
January 7, 2013 | By E. Scott Reckard and Jim Puzzanghera, Los Angeles Times
In two of the biggest civil settlements since the financial crisis, the nation's biggest banks agreed Monday to cough up nearly $19 billion to resolve federal allegations of mortgage misdeeds. Bankers saw the settlements as a major step in providing more certainty for their balance sheets and possibly foreshadowing an end to the era of billion-dollar mea culpas and open-ended regulatory probes. In one case, 10 banks settled with regulators for $8.5 billion. In the second, Bank of America Corp.
BUSINESS
October 1, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- Although the federal government began a partial shutdown Tuesday, most financial regulators remained on the job because their agencies are funded outside the congressional appropriations process. But the effects of the shutdown still will be felt in the financial sector -- and would increase the longer it lasts. The special mechanisms that pay for most financial regulators -- in many cases through fees on the firms they oversee -- limits the direct consequences of the shutdown on Wall Street and the banking industry.
BUSINESS
April 27, 2012 | By E. Scott Reckard
Palm Desert National Bank was seized by regulators Friday and sold to Pacific Premier Bank of Costa Mesa, which promised to be open for business as usual Monday.  The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. said depositors of the one-branch bank would be unaffected because Pacific Premier agreed to take all $123 million in Palm Desert deposits. Pacific Premier President Stephen Gardner said customers of the Palm Desert bank "will continue to conduct business as normal with the employees with whom they have built a solid long-term relationship.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 2013 | By Michael J. Mishak and Jessica Garrison
SACRAMENTO -- Ethics officials are reviewing allegations that two of state's top environmental regulators violated conflict-of-interest rules by regulating companies in which they own stock. Officials at the Fair Political Practices Commission said Wednesday they are studying a complaint that Odette Madriago, chief deputy director of the Department of Toxic Substances Control, and Stewart Black, deputy director of the agency's brownfields and environmental restoration division, may have improperly taken regulatory actions affecting the operations of oil, chemical and manufacturing companies in which they have financial interests.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2014 | By Tony Barboza
A day after hearing hours of impassioned testimony from a divided trucking industry, California air quality regulators on Friday postponed deadlines for aging heavy-duty trucks to comply with the nation's toughest diesel air pollution rules. The action by the state Air Resources Board will give small fleets, lightly used trucks and those operating in rural areas more time to upgrade to newer, cleaner models or install filters to remove soot from their exhaust. Officials say the changes will slow pollution cuts for several years but still allow the state to reach its goal of cutting diesel emissions 85% by 2020.
OPINION
April 24, 2014 | Times Editorial Board
It has taken far too long for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to impose regulations on e-cigarettes: More than three years have passed since it announced its intention to do so. During that time, the devices have caught on with teenagers, whose use of them doubled from 2011 to 2012. And the rules proposed Thursday will not be finalized for at least another year. The new regulations are appropriately strong in many ways, banning sales to minors and requiring the disclosure of ingredients as well as evidence for any marketing claims that e-cigarettes are healthier than traditional cigarettes.
NATIONAL
April 23, 2014 | By Lalita Clozel
WASHINGTON - The Food and Drug Administration plans to begin regulating electronic cigarettes for the first time, banning sales to minors and requiring manufacturers to put health warnings on the nicotine-delivering devices that have become a multibillion-dollar industry, according to officials who described the agency's proposal. But the agency will stop short of steps that many public health advocates and some members of Congress have called for, including restrictions on television advertisements and flavorings, such as pumpkin spice or chocolate, that may target younger consumers, officials said.
OPINION
April 22, 2014 | Patt Morrison
"Fracking" - now there's a word that just begs for a bumper sticker. Short for "hydraulic fracturing" - the process of breaking open rock with high-pressure liquids to get at otherwise untappable oil and natural gas - fracking conjures up a welcome energy boom for some, ecological disaster for others. Mark Zoback - Stanford geophysicist since 1984, member of the National Academy of Engineering's Deepwater Horizon investigation committee, personal "decarbonizer," fracking expert - sees the problems and the potential for California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2014 | By Christine Mai-Duc
The beleaguered operator of a Vernon battery-recycling plant announced the temporary layoffs of nearly all of its employees Monday, weeks after air-quality regulators shut down its operations over air pollution concerns. Exide Technologies said in a statement that it had issued notices to 104 hourly employees and 20 managers at the facility that they could be laid off within 60 days. The plant, which has been a source of community outrage since regulators announced last year that its arsenic emissions posed a danger to more than 100,000 people, has been idle since last month.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO -- Medical marijuana dispensaries in California would have to get state Public Health Department licenses, and doctors who recommend pot would face new standards for examining patients under legislation supported Monday by a state Senate panel. The measure, supported by members of the Senate Business, Professions and Economic Development Committee, also clarifies the authority of cities and counties to prohibit pot shops within their borders. Sen. Lou Correa (D-Santa Ana)
BUSINESS
October 10, 2012 | By Jerry Hirsch
Federal safety regulators are warning that counterfeit air bags are being installed by auto repair shops that might not deploy in an accident or alternately, could explode, sending metal shrapnel into the vehicle's passenger cabin. “We want consumers to be immediately aware of this problem and to review our safety information to see if their vehicle could be in need of inspection,” said Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood. The fake air bags look nearly identical to certified, original-equipment parts, right down to bearing the insignia and branding of major automakers, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.
BUSINESS
July 3, 2012 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- Regulators on Tuesday released shortened public versions of breakup plans known as "living wills" that the nine largest banks were required to submit so the government could safely shut them down if they were in danger of collapsing. The resolution plans were required by the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial reform law to prevent the chaos that swept through the financial system when Lehman Bros. failed in September 2008. Banks with more than $250 billion in non-bank assets were the first financial institutions required to submit the plans to the Federal Reserve and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp., which will review them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2014 | By Kate Linthicum
Thousands of immigrants seeking protection in the United States have spent months in detention waiting for the government to determine whether they may have legitimate cases, even though regulations say they should receive a determination within 10 days, according to a class-action lawsuit filed Thursday. The lawsuit, which was brought by two California chapters of the American Civil Liberties Union and the Chicago-based National Immigrant Justice Center, claims the government violated the law and needlessly spent tens of millions of taxpayer dollars on detention.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2014 | By Bettina Boxall
The state Department of Public Health is adopting the nation's first-ever drinking water standard for hexavalent chromium, a carcinogen found in water supplies across the state. The department announced Tuesday that it has submitted a final regulation setting a limit of 10 parts per billion in public drinking water supplies, a level that will require more than 100 water systems to treat for the contaminant. If approved as expected by the Office of Administrative Law, the standard would take effect July 1. Public health Director Ron Chapman said the limit "will protect public health while taking into consideration economic and technical feasibility as required by law. " Known as chromium 6, the toxic heavy metal makes its way into groundwater naturally from geological formations.
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