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Regulatory Reform

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NEWS
July 12, 1995 | Associated Press
The Senate agreed Tuesday to narrow the scope of a sweeping regulatory reform bill, increasing the likelihood of garnering enough Democratic support for final approval. The bill would require agencies to compare the cost of a regulation against its environmental, health or safety benefits.
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BUSINESS
February 26, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
Critics and supporters of a merger of American Airlines and US Airways to form the nation's largest carrier testified for the first time Tuesday in a hearing before a congressional panel. The merger, announced Feb. 14, would cost $1.2 billion in one-time costs but would generate $1 billion annually in new savings and added revenue, representatives from the two airlines said in testimony to a House of Representatives subcommittee in Washington, D.C. Stephen Johnson, executive vice president for US Airways, and Gary Kennedy, senior vice president at American Airlines, both praised the merger plan, saying it would benefit passengers and increase competition.
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NEWS
July 11, 1995 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Senate Democrats and Republicans returned Monday from a week's holiday to spar over a plan to overhaul the federal government's powers to draft regulations. The showdown, which is expected to play out this week, pits a proposal put forward by Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole (R-Kan.), a presidential contender whose campaign stands to gain financial support from the business community as a result of the plan, against a milder alternative drawn up by Sen. John Glenn (D-Ohio).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2013 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
SACRAMENTO - Gov. Jerry Brown spoke only two sentences about streamlining environmental regulations in his State of the State address. But they inspired reformers to cheer. Could have fooled me. I was ready to pounce on him last week for scanty treatment, for kissing off the subject with only a brief reference, a throwaway line. But I'd have been wrong, say some experts, people who specialize in semantics and nuances. "The fact he mentioned it at all was a home run with the bases loaded," says Carl Guardino, president and CEO of the Silicon Valley Leadership Group, a trade association.
NEWS
March 17, 1995 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton, trying to steal a march on Republican plans to scale back federal regulation drastically, Thursday announced the first in a series of moves to streamline the way the government regulates drugs, the environment and small business. Clinton visited a small print shop in Northern Virginia to unveil a number of steps that will reduce business paperwork, consolidate environmental rules and speed the approval of new medical devices and drug-manufacturing techniques.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1994 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Orange County's legislators have their way this year, California would become a far different place in ways both large and small. Businesses would reel in hefty tax breaks. The traditional school janitor would be a thing of the past. Reform schools would experience a revival. Illegal immigrants might want to pack their bags. Organized labor would absorb a sizable salary cut for work on public projects. School-aged gangbangers would be well-advised to clean up their acts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1996
The political focus of "Wilson Succeeds in Easing Environmental Safeguards"(Feb. 15) might leave readers with an incomplete or even misleading impression of Gov. Pete Wilson's regulatory reform efforts. California has long combined many of the world's strictest environmental standards with an often confusing and convoluted bureaucratic process. Regulatory reform is focused on making the process simpler, faster, more enforceable and more accountable. This not only cuts economic costs, but it leads to more rapid achievement of the standards.
BUSINESS
October 30, 1995 | Times Staff Reports
Regulatory Roundtable: The California Environmental Protection Agency will hold a series of public meetings throughout Southern California this week as part of Gov. Pete Wilson's push to reform the state regulatory process. California EPA officials and representatives from other state environmental regulators will solicit regulatory reform ideas from environmental groups, regulated companies, elected officials and the public.
REAL ESTATE
August 17, 1986 | ED GOLDMAN, Special to The Times and Goldman is a Sacramento-based free-lance writer. and
Regulatory reform, which its proponents claim would hold down the costs of buying and renting homes and apartments, was the oft-repeated theme at a conference here co-sponsored by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and the California building industry and apartment associations. Shirley McVay Wiseman, vice president/secretary of the National Assn.
BUSINESS
February 26, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
Critics and supporters of a merger of American Airlines and US Airways to form the nation's largest carrier testified for the first time Tuesday in a hearing before a congressional panel. The merger, announced Feb. 14, would cost $1.2 billion in one-time costs but would generate $1 billion annually in new savings and added revenue, representatives from the two airlines said in testimony to a House of Representatives subcommittee in Washington, D.C. Stephen Johnson, executive vice president for US Airways, and Gary Kennedy, senior vice president at American Airlines, both praised the merger plan, saying it would benefit passengers and increase competition.
OPINION
November 4, 2012 | Doyle McManus
After a year of campaign sound and fury, we're about to hold an election that will probably fail to usher in the one thing voters of all stripes would like to see: an end to the partisan gridlock in Congress. Neither President Obama nor Mitt Romney appears likely to win the kind of landslide victory that provides a mandate for big change. And whoever wins the presidency is almost certain to face at least two years of divided government in Congress: a Republican House, a Democratic Senate.
NEWS
August 15, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli
President Obama dismissed Republican claims that Vice President Joe Biden had a nefarious intent when he said the GOP would “put y'all back in chains” at a campaign stop in Virginia on Tuesday, telling People magazine in an interview his remarks had to be considered in context. Rather than being about “division and hate and anger,” as Mitt Romney said of Biden's remarks, the president said his running mate was saying only that "you, consumers, the American people, will be a lot worse off if we repeal these [Wall Street reform]
BUSINESS
August 24, 2011 | By Christi Parsons, Los Angeles Times
The Obama administration is unveiling a slate of regulatory changes it says will cut government red tape and save businesses more than $10 billion over the next five years — and, the White House hopes, bolster its effort to promote job and economic growth. The plan includes about 500 changes aimed at saving businesses money in a variety of ways, such as consolidating their IRS paperwork, simplifying hazard warnings they must post for workers, and expediting payment to government contractors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 2011 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
The first point to be made about the state budget the Legislature passed Tuesday night is that Proposition 25 worked. California's Capitol has become less dysfunctional. Consider: This will be only the sixth time in the last 25 years that a budget has been enacted by the start of the fiscal year, assuming Gov. Jerry Brown signs it before Friday. And he will; he already has signed pieces of it. Before Prop. 25, approved by voters last November, California was one of only three states that required a two-thirds vote of the Legislature for budget passage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2011 | By Michael J. Mishak, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from San Jose -- Gov. Jerry Brown called on Republican lawmakers Friday to return to the budget bargaining table, saying he's ready to cut a deal on pension and regulatory reform to help solve the state's fiscal crisis. Speaking to hundreds of corporate executives at the Silicon Valley Leadership Group's annual summit, Brown challenged GOP legislators to present specific proposals to resuscitate talks that collapsed last month. "What we need now is a deal," Brown said.
BUSINESS
July 25, 2010 | Kathy M. Kristof, Personal Finance
It may be time to revamp your banking relationships. With financial reform choking off a variety of bank fees and other traditional sources of bank revenue, consumers are likely to see their financial institutions shift costs and service charges to areas unaffected by regulatory reform, said Adam Levin, co-founder of the credit-shopping website Credit.com. That means your checking account might cost more, your credit card reward program might provide less and your best bet for borrowing may not be the neighborhood bank.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2013 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
SACRAMENTO - Gov. Jerry Brown spoke only two sentences about streamlining environmental regulations in his State of the State address. But they inspired reformers to cheer. Could have fooled me. I was ready to pounce on him last week for scanty treatment, for kissing off the subject with only a brief reference, a throwaway line. But I'd have been wrong, say some experts, people who specialize in semantics and nuances. "The fact he mentioned it at all was a home run with the bases loaded," says Carl Guardino, president and CEO of the Silicon Valley Leadership Group, a trade association.
NEWS
August 15, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli
President Obama dismissed Republican claims that Vice President Joe Biden had a nefarious intent when he said the GOP would “put y'all back in chains” at a campaign stop in Virginia on Tuesday, telling People magazine in an interview his remarks had to be considered in context. Rather than being about “division and hate and anger,” as Mitt Romney said of Biden's remarks, the president said his running mate was saying only that "you, consumers, the American people, will be a lot worse off if we repeal these [Wall Street reform]
OPINION
June 30, 2010
Now that we've all had the pleasure of paying for Wall Street's last collapse, who should be on the hook for the next one? That question underlies the long-running rhetorical battle over the regulatory overhaul proposal that Democrats steered through a conference committee this week. Republicans have warned that the bill, HR 4173, would guarantee that Wall Street firms would be bailed out by the government in the future. Democrats insisted that the bill would do just the opposite, confining the losses at failed companies to their investors and employees.
BUSINESS
February 20, 2010 | By Nathaniel Popper
In a genteel event on Manhattan's Upper East Side on Thursday night, former Treasury Secretary Henry M. Paulson had some sharp words for members of Congress who opposed the bank bailout two years ago and the push for financial regulatory reform today. Paulson worked for a Republican president, but he said that during the negotiations to save the economy in fall 2008, as the Troubled Asset Relief Program was on the line, "the House Republicans were the biggest problem." Today, with legislation for financial reform nearly at a standstill, Paulson had some similar broad-ranging criticisms.
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