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Rehavam Zeevi

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 1991
Your editorial (Feb. 5) criticizes Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir for bringing into his cabinet Rehavam Zeevi, leader of the small Homeland Party, which advocates the transfer of the Arab population of the West Bank (Judea-Samaria) and Gaza to neighboring Arab countries, especially Jordan, a Palestinian state. This does not mean that Shamir has endorsed Zeevi's point of view. Why did Shamir make this move? It seems to me that there were several factors that led to his decision.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
December 21, 2010 | By Batsheva Sobelman, Los Angeles Times
When Israel decided to redesign its bank notes, it ran into some trouble: No one, apparently, fit the bill. A year ago, a committee empowered by the Bank of Israel chose Theodor Herzl, David Ben-Gurion, Menachem Begin and Yitzhak Rabin to adorn the country's four bank notes. A balanced choice, many would say: the visionary of the Jewish state, Israel's first prime minister, the hawk who forged peace with Egypt, and the soldier-turned-dove who made peace with Jordan and was slain while advancing the process with the Palestinians.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 1991
Rehavam Zeevi, probably the most extreme member of an Israeli government that has never been famous for its moderation, charges that President Bush is an anti-Semite or, as he later amended the allegation, "very close to it." What is the basis for this insulting characterization? Well, the President of the United States has asked Congress to delay, for four months, taking action on Israel's request for $10 billion in immigrant housing loan guarantees.
NEWS
October 17, 2001 | MARY CURTIUS and TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Israel's right-wing, anti-Arab tourism minister, Rehavam Zeevi, was the target of an assassination attempt this morning at a hotel in mostly Arab East Jerusalem. Zeevi, who has long advocated the expulsion of Israeli Arab citizens and of Palestinians in the West Bank and Gaza Strip, was shot at least twice, police said.
NEWS
March 9, 2001 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Is this a joke? That's what the woman writing to the Jerusalem Post wanted to know. She had just learned that the government of Prime Minister Ariel Sharon includes right-wing ultranationalist Rehavam Zeevi--who advocates expelling all Arabs from Israel--as the nation's minister of tourism. Tourism, no less.
NEWS
February 4, 1991 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir reinforced his Cabinet with an anti-Arab former general who favors the expulsion of Palestinians from the occupied West Bank and Gaza Strip, sparking complaints from supporters and critics alike that the prime minister is squandering the goodwill earned by Israel during the Persian Gulf War. Shamir named Rehavam Zeevi a minister without portfolio and invited him to sit in on the special Defense Cabinet formed for the Gulf crisis.
WORLD
December 21, 2010 | By Batsheva Sobelman, Los Angeles Times
When Israel decided to redesign its bank notes, it ran into some trouble: No one, apparently, fit the bill. A year ago, a committee empowered by the Bank of Israel chose Theodor Herzl, David Ben-Gurion, Menachem Begin and Yitzhak Rabin to adorn the country's four bank notes. A balanced choice, many would say: the visionary of the Jewish state, Israel's first prime minister, the hawk who forged peace with Egypt, and the soldier-turned-dove who made peace with Jordan and was slain while advancing the process with the Palestinians.
NEWS
September 16, 1991 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A session of Israel's Cabinet held Sunday to discuss the deep divisions between the Bush Administration and the government of Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir quickly gave way to unrestrained ill will, with one minister branding Bush an anti-Semite. The outbursts highlighted the political passions aroused by Bush's vow to delay U.S. guarantees for $10 billion in loans to house and provide jobs for Soviet immigrants flooding into Israel.
NEWS
October 17, 2001 | MARY CURTIUS and TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Israel's right-wing, anti-Arab tourism minister, Rehavam Zeevi, was the target of an assassination attempt this morning at a hotel in mostly Arab East Jerusalem. Zeevi, who has long advocated the expulsion of Israeli Arab citizens and of Palestinians in the West Bank and Gaza Strip, was shot at least twice, police said.
OPINION
October 21, 2001
The hypocrisy of the Israeli government's outrage in the wake of the killing of Tourism Minister Rehavam Zeevi could not be more breathtaking ("Israel Issues Ultimatum After Minister's Slaying," Oct. 18). Israel has for years pursued a deliberate policy of targeting Palestinian officials and leaders for extrajudicial assassination, often by rocketing from U.S.-supplied helicopter gunships or via long-range sniper fire from Israeli military units. Dozens of high-ranking Palestinians have been murdered in this fashion, with only muted objection by the U.S., which continues to supply Israel with billions of dollars of aid annually.
NEWS
March 9, 2001 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Is this a joke? That's what the woman writing to the Jerusalem Post wanted to know. She had just learned that the government of Prime Minister Ariel Sharon includes right-wing ultranationalist Rehavam Zeevi--who advocates expelling all Arabs from Israel--as the nation's minister of tourism. Tourism, no less.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 1991
Rehavam Zeevi, probably the most extreme member of an Israeli government that has never been famous for its moderation, charges that President Bush is an anti-Semite or, as he later amended the allegation, "very close to it." What is the basis for this insulting characterization? Well, the President of the United States has asked Congress to delay, for four months, taking action on Israel's request for $10 billion in immigrant housing loan guarantees.
NEWS
September 16, 1991 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A session of Israel's Cabinet held Sunday to discuss the deep divisions between the Bush Administration and the government of Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir quickly gave way to unrestrained ill will, with one minister branding Bush an anti-Semite. The outbursts highlighted the political passions aroused by Bush's vow to delay U.S. guarantees for $10 billion in loans to house and provide jobs for Soviet immigrants flooding into Israel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 1991
Your editorial (Feb. 5) criticizes Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir for bringing into his cabinet Rehavam Zeevi, leader of the small Homeland Party, which advocates the transfer of the Arab population of the West Bank (Judea-Samaria) and Gaza to neighboring Arab countries, especially Jordan, a Palestinian state. This does not mean that Shamir has endorsed Zeevi's point of view. Why did Shamir make this move? It seems to me that there were several factors that led to his decision.
NEWS
February 4, 1991 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir reinforced his Cabinet with an anti-Arab former general who favors the expulsion of Palestinians from the occupied West Bank and Gaza Strip, sparking complaints from supporters and critics alike that the prime minister is squandering the goodwill earned by Israel during the Persian Gulf War. Shamir named Rehavam Zeevi a minister without portfolio and invited him to sit in on the special Defense Cabinet formed for the Gulf crisis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2001
Ariel Sharon has been installed as Israel's prime minister, together with an oversize multi-party Cabinet that many expect to behave more like a large, dysfunctional family than a smooth-running government. Its members range from dovish Foreign Minister Shimon Peres on the left to Tourism Minister Rehavam Zeevi--who advocates expelling all Palestinians from the West Bank--on the lunatic right. Sharon calls it a national unity government.
NEWS
November 18, 2001 | From Times Wire Services
Israeli troops withdrew from the West Bank town of Tulkarm on Saturday, the army said, the latest in a series of pullbacks from six towns and cities the military entered last month, drawing U.S. complaints. Palestinian officials said the withdrawal from Tulkarm had begun but was not yet complete. A pullback from the northern West Bank town would leave troops only in the town of Jenin.
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