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Reidar Jonsson

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 1992
The Swedish writer Reidar Jonsson is a rarity even in Hollywood. It's not his nationality that distinguishes him. It's the attitude thing. He admits to liking what he does. He likes the town and the people he works with. He likes story meetings. He likes the idea of options and doing rewrites. He likes projects, points and studio people. He even likes the executives he works with. For that matter, he likes his agent.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 1992
The Swedish writer Reidar Jonsson is a rarity even in Hollywood. It's not his nationality that distinguishes him. It's the attitude thing. He admits to liking what he does. He likes the town and the people he works with. He likes story meetings. He likes the idea of options and doing rewrites. He likes projects, points and studio people. He even likes the executives he works with. For that matter, he likes his agent.
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BOOKS
November 10, 1991 | Michael Harris
MY FATHER, HIS SON by Reidar Jonsson , translated from the Swedish by Marianne Ruuth (Arcade: $19.95; 256 pp.) . This novel is a sequel to "My Life as a Dog," which became one of 1985's most memorable foreign films. Moviegoers will recall that its young hero, Ingemar Johansson, tried to distance himself from his problems--sick mother, absent father, bullying older brother--by identifying with Laika, the dog that orbited the Earth in a Soviet spacecraft.
BOOKS
November 10, 1991 | Michael Harris
MY FATHER, HIS SON by Reidar Jonsson , translated from the Swedish by Marianne Ruuth (Arcade: $19.95; 256 pp.) . This novel is a sequel to "My Life as a Dog," which became one of 1985's most memorable foreign films. Moviegoers will recall that its young hero, Ingemar Johansson, tried to distance himself from his problems--sick mother, absent father, bullying older brother--by identifying with Laika, the dog that orbited the Earth in a Soviet spacecraft.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 1997 | LYNNE HEFFLEY
If you harbor fond memories of the Academy Award-nominated film "My Life as a Dog"--that poignant, eccentric look at a small boy's life in 1950s Sweden--do yourself a favor and avoid tuning in to Showtime's new series of the same name, beginning Sunday. Yes, Reidar Jonsson, upon whose book the film was based, helped develop the series for TV, and shares "creative executive" credit with Donna Matson-Jonsson.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 1987 | SHEILA BENSON, Times Film Critic
How has Swedish director Lasse Hallstrom remembered so precisely that knife edge between pain and delight that is childhood? In "My Life as a Dog" (Friday at the Music Hall) he has caught it all, in a sterling film whose style sits between the light moments of his compatriot, Ingmar Bergman, and the darker moments of Francois Truffaut's childhood films. With freshness in such short supply that it's nearly endangered, "My Life as a Dog" should be cherished.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 1988
A complete list of nominees for the 60th annual Academy Awards: Picture "Broadcast News," James L. Brooks, producer "Fatal Attraction," Stanley R.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 1988 | DIANE HAITHMAN, Times Staff Writer
While waiting to begin production on a new feature film version of "Peter Pan"--and, more important, to find out if he will win Academy Awards tonight for directing and co-authoring the hit film "My Life as a Dog"--Swedish film maker Lasse Hallstrom says he has been "getting some wet feet" by making a television pilot. Hallstrom, 41, is a relative newcomer to Hollywood, to television and, apparently, to American slang--but he is happily looking forward to his life as a TV producer.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 1987 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
For years Swedish film seemed to begin and end with Ingmar Bergman. There were always others, of course, including Bo Widerberg ("Elvira Madigan"), Jan Troell ("The Emigrants") and Vilgot Sjoman, the one-time Bergman assistant who then did "I Am Curious Yellow." Still the Bergman light was bright and obscuring. But now time has passed, Bergman has retired from film making and a post-Bergman generation is at hand.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1988 | MICHAEL CIEPLY, Times Staff Writer
For the first time in Academy Awards history, no American was nominated for directing, even though big studio favorites swept the best picture nominations in a topsy-turvy 60th Oscar race. "The Last Emperor," Columbia's Bernardo Bertolucci-directed film about Chinese emperor Pu Yi, topped the list with nine nominations, including best picture, best directing and best screenplay adaptation. But Steven Spielberg and James L.
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