Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsReimbursement
IN THE NEWS

Reimbursement

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1988 | DAVID HALDANE and ELAINE WOO, Times Staff Writers
The state was ordered Tuesday to pay up to $35 million to the Long Beach Unified School District for money spent on voluntary desegregation efforts from 1977 to 1984, a ruling that could affect dozens of school districts around California. The order by Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Robert I. Weil followed more than five years of efforts by the Long Beach district to recover the expenses of its desegregation program, which began in 1972.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2014 | By Christine Mai-Duc
The Port of Long Beach spent tens of thousands of dollars subsidizing the travel of spouses who accompanied harbor commissioners and staff on trips to Tokyo, Paris and Montreal despite city restrictions that ban such reimbursements, a city audit shows. The audit, which targeted five of the most expensive trips in the last two years, found that commissioners were able to get around restrictions by booking "companion tickets," which billed the spouse's flight as "free" but actually built in the costs, sometimes more than doubling the original fare.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
April 12, 1992 | From Associated Press
From a British schoolteacher who lost his life savings to a Beverly Hills millionaire who fears he may lose his home, claims are rolling in for the millions forfeited by the Bank of Credit and Commerce International. Gerald Bolton, a Briton living in Qatar, says he had about $100,000 in a savings account at BCCI's home branch in Luxembourg. "This humble petitioner . . . pleads with the court to enable me to retrieve the money I have deposited," Bolton wrote.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2014 | By Chris Megerian
SACRAMENTO -- Two Assembly Democrats want to restore funding for California's healthcare program for the poor, laying the groundwork for another debate over how to make the best use of the state's financial recovery. The proposal, AB 1805, would reverse a 10% cut to reimbursements to doctors and other healthcare providers who treat Medi-Cal patients. The reduction was made when the state faced gaping budget deficits, and Gov. Jerry Brown plans on keeping it in place even though a surplus is expected.
NATIONAL
November 14, 2013 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON - The "closed" signs at the national parks have been down for weeks but states still don't know whether they will be reimbursed by federal taxpayers for their costs of reopening landmarks such as the Grand Canyon and Statue of Liberty during the partial government shutdown. "This a federal responsibility," Utah Gov. Gary Herbert told The Times on Thursday, saying his state stepped in "because of dysfunctionality in Washington" and it's time for the U.S. government to reimburse his state "for the goodwill of the people of Utah.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Modesto Police Chief Roy Wasden and the mother of slain teacher Laci Peterson went to the state Capitol on Tuesday seeking reimbursement for the $1.5 million police spent on the Scott Peterson investigation. Wasden said if his department doesn't get the money soon, it may mean fewer officers on the streets. Sharon Rocha said she accompanied the chief because she wanted to make sure other investigations receive the same level of attention and commitment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1995
Seven homeless people who sued the city of Long Beach will be reimbursed a total of $4,000 for belongings lost during a sweep by city employees of their makeshift camp near Shoreline Park. The six men and one woman lost all their belongings during an unannounced June, 1993, sweep, despite assurances from several people left in the camp that they would move the items.
NATIONAL
January 25, 2006 | Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, Times Staff Writer
California and more than 20 other states will be "fully reimbursed" for hundreds of thousands of emergency prescriptions for seniors who ran into trouble with the new Medicare drug benefit, top federal officials said Tuesday. The promise was part of a seven-point plan by Health and Human Services Secretary Mike Leavitt to try to resolve the continuing frustration faced by many patients and pharmacists since the benefit took effect three weeks ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1999
The Los Angeles City Council asked the Department of Transportation on Tuesday to come up with recommendations on how to reimburse drivers who get parking tickets as a result of faulty meters. A recent study by the department showed that 11% of the city's new digital meters are broken at any given time, leading to many erroneous parking tickets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1991 | MARIA NEWMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To aid the dozens of county employees in the military reserves, county supervisors agreed Tuesday to make up for any pay loss the employees suffer if called to active duty. So far, 10 county employees have been called to duty since the outbreak of war last week, Supervisor Don R. Roth said. While exact figures were not available, county officials estimate that 75 to 100 of the county's 16,000 employees are in the reserves. Board Chairman Gaddi H.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 2014 | By David Zahniser
A San Fernando Valley businessman who admitted to illegally reimbursing campaign contributors during the 2011 municipal election faces a $45,000 fine from the Los Angeles City Ethics Commission. Juan Carlos Jaramillo, 52, has already agreed to pay the proposed penalty, which stems from his fundraising activities in support of Rudy Martinez, who lost to City Councilman Jose Huizar. The Ethics Commission must decide Thursday whether to impose the fine or seek a different penalty.
BUSINESS
February 6, 2014 | By Noam N. Levey
WASHINGTON - In a rare bipartisan agreement, congressional leaders have settled on a plan to fix Medicare's system for paying physicians, potentially ending years of uncertainty that often held up fees for doctors who care for the nation's senior citizens. The proposed fix still must be paid for, requiring lawmakers to come up with as much as $150 billion in savings from elsewhere in the budget. But there is optimism on Capitol Hill that the federal government will finally replace a dysfunctional 17-year-old system designed to control Medicare spending by limiting annual increases in physicians' reimbursements.
NATIONAL
November 14, 2013 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON - The "closed" signs at the national parks have been down for weeks but states still don't know whether they will be reimbursed by federal taxpayers for their costs of reopening landmarks such as the Grand Canyon and Statue of Liberty during the partial government shutdown. "This a federal responsibility," Utah Gov. Gary Herbert told The Times on Thursday, saying his state stepped in "because of dysfunctionality in Washington" and it's time for the U.S. government to reimburse his state "for the goodwill of the people of Utah.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 2013 | By Ruben Vives
The Internal Revenue Service has filed charges against 28 Marine reservists in what has been described as a travel voucher scheme in which the government was fraudulently billed for hotel stays and other expenses. The members of the U.S. Marine Corps Forces Reserve were assigned to the Third Air Naval Gunfire Liaison Company at Terminal Island, according to Special Agent Linda Lowery, an IRS spokeswoman. A 50-count indictment filed in September alleges that between August 2007 and September 2009, seven Marine reservists conspired to defraud the Department of Defense by receiving payments for fraudulent travel and hotel expenses.
BUSINESS
June 23, 2013 | By Chad Terhune
When the California Public Employees' Retirement System told its Anthem Blue Cross members it would pay only up to $30,000 for a knee or hip replacement surgery, some patients shopped around for a cheaper hospital. What may be more surprising is that about 40 higher-priced hospitals in the state cut their surgery prices significantly to avoid losing patients. That response accounted for about 85% of the $5.5 million CalPERS saved over two years, researchers at UC Berkeley found, with the rest of the savings coming from patients opting for lower-cost hospitals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 2013 | By Jack Leonard and Jack Dolan, Los Angeles Times
A Beverly Hills-based property developer is under investigation for allegedly using his daughters and two of his firm's attorneys to launder illegal campaign contributions to Los Angeles County Assessor John Noguez, according to a search warrant obtained by the Los Angeles Times. The warrant comes as the district attorney's influence-peddling investigation focuses on whether commercial property owners who contributed to Noguez - and received significant property tax breaks - violated the law by hiding the true source of campaign money to the assessor.
BUSINESS
October 19, 2005 | From Reuters
Humana Inc. said it had settled a six-year dispute with representatives of more than 700,000 physicians over reimbursement and would make a $40-million payment. Louisville, Ky.-based Humana joins other health insurers such as Aetna Inc. and Cigna Corp. in settling with the doctors. The agreement still must be approved by a federal judge in Miami, Humana said.
NATIONAL
October 1, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Vernon Jordan, the prominent attorney who helped Monica Lewinsky find a job after she left the White House, will not be reimbursed for most of his legal bills arising from an investigation of then-President Clinton's relationship with Lewinsky, a federal appeals court has ruled. Jordan asked the federal government to pay the $302,719 in fees he spent to defend himself during the investigation by the independent counsel's office. But the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 2013 | By Jessica Garrison, Los Angeles Times
The state agency responsible for protecting Californians from toxic contamination has spent more than $145 million over the last 25 years cleaning up hazardous waste sites but failed to collect reimbursement from the companies responsible for the pollution, according to information provided by the agency Thursday. The Department of Toxic Substances Control has never tried to collect more than $100 million in cleanup costs from polluters, an agency memo shows. In addition, the department has billed companies $45 million for cleanup costs that they have not paid, Director Debbie Raphael said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 2013 | By Paul Pringle and Rong-Gong Lin II, Los Angeles Times
The overseers of the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum concealed from the public independent reports of lax financial controls and widespread spending abuses at the taxpayer-owned stadium that included sloppy accounting of hot dog sales and excessive perks for managers, records show. Problems detailed in the reports by two independent audit and consulting firms compounded money woes that leaders of the Coliseum Commission cited as a chief reason they decided to turn over stewardship of the two-time Olympic venue to USC. The Times obtained the reports through the court as part of a pending lawsuit the news organization filed against the commission, alleging that the panel has violated the California Public Records Act and open-meetings law. The commission refused to release the reports when The Times first inquired about them in 2011.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|