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Reinhold Messner

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June 29, 1989 | RICH ROBERTS, Times Staff Writer
Reinhold Messner has been to the mountaintops--the 14 highest in the world--and what he has seen appalls him. Cable cars crisscross the great mountains of Europe, trash lines the routes into the Himalayas and Mt. Everest is overcrowded with expeditions. "Most of the expeditions the last five years have been less for adventure and more for show," Messner says. That is the inspiration for Messner's "White Wilderness" concept to defend the world's remaining unexplored regions against abusive intrusion-- white in that they appear as blank areas on maps, places where only Messner and others like him care to go. He expounded on his idea this month at the Mountain Summit, a gathering organized by Dan McConnell of Seattle of some of the world's best climbers, among whom Messner is a giant.
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April 23, 2000 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
What is the moral usefulness of fiction? What are its moral limits? When a writer creates incest and murder, what is he or she asking of us? That we judge and forgive him? That we watch him forgive himself? That we look at our own lives and play our actions out on a mental stage so hypothetical it may as well be fiction? In "The Blue Bedspread," sister and brother find solace in each other, find escape from their violent father. As they grow older, escape becomes sex.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1999 | NATALIE NICHOLS
What does the North Carolina trio's slick, antiseptic song cycle have to do with German mountaineer Reinhold Messner, a seasoned adventurer who in 1980 became the first solo climber to scale Mt. Everest without using bottled oxygen? Well, Messner's own books on his exploits have been called surprisingly dry and uninspiring, so perhaps wise-guy pianist-songwriter Ben Folds, drummer Darren Jessee and bassist Robert Sledge are mocking Messner with such banal musings as "Narcolepsy" and "Regrets."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1999 | NATALIE NICHOLS
What does the North Carolina trio's slick, antiseptic song cycle have to do with German mountaineer Reinhold Messner, a seasoned adventurer who in 1980 became the first solo climber to scale Mt. Everest without using bottled oxygen? Well, Messner's own books on his exploits have been called surprisingly dry and uninspiring, so perhaps wise-guy pianist-songwriter Ben Folds, drummer Darren Jessee and bassist Robert Sledge are mocking Messner with such banal musings as "Narcolepsy" and "Regrets."
SPORTS
November 2, 1994 | BENJAMIN EPSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The first person to climb Mt. Everest without supplemental oxygen, the first to climb it solo, the first to climb all 14 of the world's peaks over 8,000 meters--often alone, always without oxygen--has gone horizontal. At 50, Italy's Reinhold Messner, often cited as the world's greatest living mountaineer, has decided long walks are more appropriate for him. "Now I prepare to go to the North Pole," said Messner. "The Himalaya is not as challenging.
NEWS
March 1, 1995 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There are four toes in his boots, white flecks in his beard and 50 years riding on his shoulders. In Reinhold Messner's reflective mind, determination jostles with intimations of mortality. The aw-shucks Italian daredevil who is generally recognized as history's greatest mountain climber is embarking on his last great expedition and perhaps his most daunting challenge--an ice cap stroll, Asia to America.
BOOKS
April 23, 2000 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
What is the moral usefulness of fiction? What are its moral limits? When a writer creates incest and murder, what is he or she asking of us? That we judge and forgive him? That we watch him forgive himself? That we look at our own lives and play our actions out on a mental stage so hypothetical it may as well be fiction? In "The Blue Bedspread," sister and brother find solace in each other, find escape from their violent father. As they grow older, escape becomes sex.
NEWS
February 13, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Italian Reinhold Messner and West German Arved Fuchs became the first to cross Antarctica without the aid of dogs or machinery. A West German magazine said they finished their 1,550-mile trek after 91 days, using sails and wind power to help pull their sledges.
SPORTS
November 2, 1994 | BENJAMIN EPSTEIN
Reaching 8,000-meter summits might or might not be a thing of Reinhold Messner's past, but he has much to say about bolting, a controversial subject among climbers and environmentalists. Bolts are drilled into rock faces to help secure climbing ropes, and are a fact of life in today's sport climbing ethic, which emphasizes short, steep, technical routes. "I have never used a bolt in my life," Messner said. "Up to 25, I was a rock climber and nothing else, but I always defend the wall.
NEWS
March 11, 1995 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a howling north wind, the temperature stood at minus 42 degrees Fahrenheit. Two explorer brothers had taken shelter in their tent on the restive ice pack that encrusts the Arctic Ocean. Suddenly, with ominous cracks, ice splintered on three sides of them. The pack began to explode, tossing towering blocks of blue ice into the air. Some sank into sudden openings of frothing sea. Others rained down, one atop another. One block smashed a sled. Fleeing another, one brother slipped into the water.
NEWS
March 11, 1995 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a howling north wind, the temperature stood at minus 42 degrees Fahrenheit. Two explorer brothers had taken shelter in their tent on the restive ice pack that encrusts the Arctic Ocean. Suddenly, with ominous cracks, ice splintered on three sides of them. The pack began to explode, tossing towering blocks of blue ice into the air. Some sank into sudden openings of frothing sea. Others rained down, one atop another. One block smashed a sled. Fleeing another, one brother slipped into the water.
NEWS
March 1, 1995 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There are four toes in his boots, white flecks in his beard and 50 years riding on his shoulders. In Reinhold Messner's reflective mind, determination jostles with intimations of mortality. The aw-shucks Italian daredevil who is generally recognized as history's greatest mountain climber is embarking on his last great expedition and perhaps his most daunting challenge--an ice cap stroll, Asia to America.
SPORTS
November 2, 1994 | BENJAMIN EPSTEIN
Reaching 8,000-meter summits might or might not be a thing of Reinhold Messner's past, but he has much to say about bolting, a controversial subject among climbers and environmentalists. Bolts are drilled into rock faces to help secure climbing ropes, and are a fact of life in today's sport climbing ethic, which emphasizes short, steep, technical routes. "I have never used a bolt in my life," Messner said. "Up to 25, I was a rock climber and nothing else, but I always defend the wall.
SPORTS
November 2, 1994 | BENJAMIN EPSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The first person to climb Mt. Everest without supplemental oxygen, the first to climb it solo, the first to climb all 14 of the world's peaks over 8,000 meters--often alone, always without oxygen--has gone horizontal. At 50, Italy's Reinhold Messner, often cited as the world's greatest living mountaineer, has decided long walks are more appropriate for him. "Now I prepare to go to the North Pole," said Messner. "The Himalaya is not as challenging.
NEWS
February 13, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Italian Reinhold Messner and West German Arved Fuchs became the first to cross Antarctica without the aid of dogs or machinery. A West German magazine said they finished their 1,550-mile trek after 91 days, using sails and wind power to help pull their sledges.
SPORTS
June 29, 1989 | RICH ROBERTS, Times Staff Writer
Reinhold Messner has been to the mountaintops--the 14 highest in the world--and what he has seen appalls him. Cable cars crisscross the great mountains of Europe, trash lines the routes into the Himalayas and Mt. Everest is overcrowded with expeditions. "Most of the expeditions the last five years have been less for adventure and more for show," Messner says. That is the inspiration for Messner's "White Wilderness" concept to defend the world's remaining unexplored regions against abusive intrusion-- white in that they appear as blank areas on maps, places where only Messner and others like him care to go. He expounded on his idea this month at the Mountain Summit, a gathering organized by Dan McConnell of Seattle of some of the world's best climbers, among whom Messner is a giant.
NEWS
March 7, 1995
Starting from Russia's Severnaya Zemlya islands in Siberia on Wednesday, Italian mountaineer Reinhold Messner and brother Hubert will attempt to become the first men to walk unaided to the North Pole. The 1,200-mile expedition will take them from Siberia to the pole to Cape Columbia, Canada's northernmost tip. Others have walked to the pole, but not without the aid of supplies brought in by dogs, ships or aircraft. The Messners say they will each pull a sled holding their supplies.
NEWS
November 17, 1986 | United Press International
At least 14 climbers died on the Nepalese side of the Himalayan mountain range during this fall's climbing season, a Tourism Ministry official said Sunday. Only 19 of the 49 climbing expeditions in the Himalayas reached their goals, the official said. Among the successful climbs were three by Italian climber Reinhold Messner who became the first man to scale the world's 14 tallest peaks.
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