Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRelapse
IN THE NEWS

Relapse

NEWS
July 3, 1997
I had almost finished the paper when my eyes rested upon Robin Abcarian's column ('Smoking Pleasures: Lighting Up, Throwing Them Away," June 25). Usually, I have about as much in common with her as I do Cathy Guisewite's "Cathy" cartoon. But lo and behold! Robin is sneaking away from her sleeping family to purchase a pack of cigarettes! Holy relapse! Who cares if they were a pack of lights. I read excitedly, pondering the possibilities. This was becoming a real woman, not a fictitious character made up by The Times.
Advertisement
NATIONAL
October 7, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli
President Obama mocked Mitt Romney on Sunday night for shifting his positions in the first nationally televised debate, saying his foe is not offering “change,” but a “relapse” to failed GOP policies. But Obama also acknowledged the poor reviews of his own showing. As he took the stage at the Nokia Theater in downtown Los Angeles after a star-studded “30 Days to Victory” concert, the president praised the performers who entertained a crowd of 6,000, with a  nod to the “old-school” Earth Wind and Fire, and the “new-school” Katy Perry.
BUSINESS
February 7, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Every person has their price, and for a 14-year-old Boston girl, her price to quit Facebook is $200. Paul Baier and his daughter entered into a contract he posted on his blog this week that will earn the daughter $200 if she can stay off of the 1-billion member social network for five months. The story of Baier and his daughter's unusual "Facebook Deactivation Agreement" has gone viral, but such a pact isn't new and for most people not necessary.  In fact, most adult users have tried without financial incentives.
SPORTS
February 4, 2013 | By Mike DiGiovanna
"Drugs had destroyed my body and my mind and my spirit. I could no longer experience happiness or surprise. I couldn't remember the last time I felt spontaneous joy. Why was I even alive?" Josh Hamilton in his autobiography, "Beyond Belief" WESTLAKE, Texas -- It was 2 a.m. when Josh Hamilton, strung out on crack cocaine, his once-robust 6-foot-4, 230-pound body withered to 180 pounds, most of his $3.96-million signing bonus squandered on booze and drugs, staggered up the steps to his grandmother's house in Raleigh, N.C. Homeless, dirty and barely coherent, Hamilton was a few days removed from a suicide attempt -- an overdose of pills -- and in the fourth year of a harrowing drug addiction that caused the former can't-miss prospect to be banned from baseball for three full seasons.
NEWS
March 5, 1989
Your article referred only to women who have relapses although the title of the article used the word those. Do only women have relapses? How about equal time for men? LUCILLE MARTIN Alhambra
SPORTS
December 18, 2005 | From the Associated Press
Pittsburgh Penguin owner-captain Mario Lemieux had a recurrence of an irregular heartbeat during a game Friday and didn't travel to Buffalo for Saturday's game against the Sabres. Lemieux, 40, was hospitalized Dec. 7 and diagnosed with atrial fibrillation, a fluttering of the heartbeat that was causing his heart to dramatically speed up at times. The condition can be treated with medication and is not expected to affect his career.
SPORTS
November 9, 1992 | MIKE PENNER
Cleveland Gary let his fingers do the talking Sunday afternoon. If this was bad news to the media mob that assembled around Gary's locker stall, only to find no clothes, no towels, no equipment bag and no Gary--hence, no comment--consider what it meant to Chuck Knox. Knox, head coach of a still-wobbly Ram football team, has entrusted his ground offense this year to a recovering fumblaholic. Not by design, mind you; call it a case of mutual desperation.
SPORTS
April 29, 1985 | TOM FRIEND, Times Staff Writer
Alan Wiggins has suffered a drug relapse, according to one of his lawyers, Edgar Paul Boyko. Wiggins, the Padres' starting second baseman, checked in to an unnamed drug rehabilitation center on Saturday after mysteriously disappearing for two days. And it was at that time that another of Wiggins' lawyers, Roy Bell, said Wiggins "may well be stressed out" and that it wasn't clear whether his disappearance could be linked to drug use.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|