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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 2007 | David Zahniser and Steve Hymon, Times Staff Writers
Nearly three weeks after Telemundo executives launched an inquiry into Channel 52 anchor Mirthala Salinas' relationship with Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, station officials have yet to ask him about it, Villaraigosa said Monday. The mayor repeated his vigorous defense of Salinas, a Spanish-language journalist who embarked on a romantic relationship with him while she reported on City Hall. He said he still believes the station will find she did nothing wrong.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2010 | By Randy Lewis
The facts and mythology of Elvis Presley's life are so far-reaching that they've spawned dozens of books, examining the King of Rock 'n' Roll seemingly from every possible perspective. Except, oddly, for that portion of his audience he arguably was most eager to please throughout his life: women. "I had already done three Elvis books, but I realized, 'Wait a minute -- there hasn't been a book that looked at him almost purely from the female perspective," said veteran music journalist Alanna Nash, author of the new biography published this week, "Baby, Let's Play House: Elvis and the Women Who Loved Him" (It Books, $27.99)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 2012 | By Erin Loury, Los Angeles Times
Growing up in South Los Angeles, Precious Jackson said she was attracted to the bad boys. "My father was a bad boy," she said. He was a hustler, a pimp, a drug addict. But Jackson also saw him as a gentleman who provided for his family. "I chose guys that emulated my dad," she said. The men she dated offered an escape from life with her overprotective grandmother, who raised her from the age of 5. "They had to be from the streets; they couldn't be a square," Jackson said. "I had to have some excitement.
MAGAZINE
October 7, 1990 | DIANE SWANBROW, Swanbrow is a Toluca Lake free-lance writer who has two sisters.
GWEN, 60, HAS SEEN MORE of her older sister Bette, 63, since moving to California several years ago than she did when they both lived in the same state. "I think it's because absence makes the heart grow fonder," Gwen says. "Bette got married when I was 18 and we never spent much time together until I moved out here. She's been here twice to visit, and we spend two or three weeks together--which is about the most time we've spent together in 40 years. We talk a lot about our mom and dad and about old times.
NEWS
December 30, 1994 | KRISTINA SAUERWEIN, Kristina Sauerwein writes about relationships for Life & Style
Squash that needy inner child. Quit calling yourself an enabler. And don't even mention your co-dependence--unless you want to repel a mate or love interest. No more pop-psychology self-analysis. No more blaming relationship problems on long past trauma-dramas or less-than-perfect parents (relax now, moms). None of these excuses will fly in what one expert calls "Do Something" 1995. "Psychobabble is dead," declares psychologist Pat Hudson, author of "Love Is a Verb," to be published in '95 by W.W. Norton.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2011 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Weekend" presents 48 hours in the lives of two gay men who are almost immediately attracted to each other, then have to figure out what that means in the complex tapestry of their individual situations. Written, directed and edited by Britain's Andrew Haigh, "Weekend" is a moving and empathetic look at how relationships develop, at how people fall in love and what that does and doesn't do to their lives. It's an observational film that offers generous satisfactions, but there are challenges along the way. Chief among those is the film's unblinking sexual candor, in language even more than action.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2010
Dear Amy: My husband and I have been married for 24 years. He does business development for a large firm. He is involved in numerous community groups, explaining that this is how he builds relationships and clients. He is home Sundays and two or three evenings each week. When home, he spends hours responding to e-mails and reading Facebook sites. I feel lonely when I see the great relationships he maintains with others, whereas all I get is a tired, stressed and distant husband.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2011 | By Susan Salter Reynolds, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Emily, Alone A Novel Stewart O'Nan Viking: 255 pp., $25.95 Stewart O'Nan's books are not about poverty, life's crises, gross injustice or family drama; in fact, there's very little drama in his works. He has become a spokesperson — in modern fiction — for the regular person, the working person, and now, the elderly. One of the most beautiful, unforgettable scenes in any novel I've ever read occurs in "Last Night at the Lobster," in which O'Nan describes the manager of a mall-style restaurant switching on the lights at the start of a new day, so full of purpose and hopefulness.
BUSINESS
October 22, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
Good luck, Gleeks and band dorks. A new report suggests that running with the in crowd in high school bodes well for future earnings potential. Those considered popular in secondary school earned 2% more decades later than oddballs such as Napoleon Dynamite - a so-called popularity premium. So says a new analysis of data from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study, which follows more than 10,000 people who graduated from the blackboard jungle in Wisconsin in 1957. Forty years after graduation, those who were in the 80th percentile of the popularity chain earned 10% more than their peers in the 20th.
HEALTH
June 2, 2012 | By Jessica P. Ogilvie, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In HBO's new show "Girls," creator Lena Dunham conjures up an image of young men so inundated with online porn that they almost unwittingly try to reenact it in their own boudoir escapades. The show is fictional, but Stanford University psychologist Philip Zimbardo believes there's a lot of reality to it. In a new e-book, "The Demise of Guys: Why Boys Struggle and What We Can Do About It," written with Nikita Duncan, Zimbardo theorizes that all those hours spent in front of a screen - not just watching porn but playing video games too - is leaving men in the dust socially, unable to relate to women and unable to function in society.
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