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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 2007 | David Zahniser and Steve Hymon, Times Staff Writers
Nearly three weeks after Telemundo executives launched an inquiry into Channel 52 anchor Mirthala Salinas' relationship with Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, station officials have yet to ask him about it, Villaraigosa said Monday. The mayor repeated his vigorous defense of Salinas, a Spanish-language journalist who embarked on a romantic relationship with him while she reported on City Hall. He said he still believes the station will find she did nothing wrong.
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SCIENCE
January 14, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
If only they had been there in 1939: Plugging in numbers representing the friendliness between pairs of nations at the outset of World War II, researchers at Cornell University used a computer program to successfully predict which countries joined the Allied Powers and which lined up with the Axis. They got all of the countries right except for Denmark and Portugal. The group's work, reported last week in the Proceedings of the National Academies of Science, had less to do with history than with a long-established theory in social psychology called "structural balance," which describes how relationships in a social network evolve over time.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2010 | By Randy Lewis
The facts and mythology of Elvis Presley's life are so far-reaching that they've spawned dozens of books, examining the King of Rock 'n' Roll seemingly from every possible perspective. Except, oddly, for that portion of his audience he arguably was most eager to please throughout his life: women. "I had already done three Elvis books, but I realized, 'Wait a minute -- there hasn't been a book that looked at him almost purely from the female perspective," said veteran music journalist Alanna Nash, author of the new biography published this week, "Baby, Let's Play House: Elvis and the Women Who Loved Him" (It Books, $27.99)
NEWS
November 25, 2001 | MIMI AVINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A young man learns he has an incurable illness and will soon die. How will he spend the time he has left? More than one television series has milked such a premise, featuring a hero who gorges on experience while the Grim Reaper pursues him as relentlessly as Lt. Gerard dogged the Fugitive. Since Sept. 11, millions of ordinary people have become stars of their own dramas. Everybody knows that no one here gets out alive, but until recently, many people ignored that truism.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 2012 | By Erin Loury, Los Angeles Times
Growing up in South Los Angeles, Precious Jackson said she was attracted to the bad boys. "My father was a bad boy," she said. He was a hustler, a pimp, a drug addict. But Jackson also saw him as a gentleman who provided for his family. "I chose guys that emulated my dad," she said. The men she dated offered an escape from life with her overprotective grandmother, who raised her from the age of 5. "They had to be from the streets; they couldn't be a square," Jackson said. "I had to have some excitement.
MAGAZINE
October 7, 1990 | DIANE SWANBROW, Swanbrow is a Toluca Lake free-lance writer who has two sisters.
GWEN, 60, HAS SEEN MORE of her older sister Bette, 63, since moving to California several years ago than she did when they both lived in the same state. "I think it's because absence makes the heart grow fonder," Gwen says. "Bette got married when I was 18 and we never spent much time together until I moved out here. She's been here twice to visit, and we spend two or three weeks together--which is about the most time we've spent together in 40 years. We talk a lot about our mom and dad and about old times.
NEWS
December 30, 1994 | KRISTINA SAUERWEIN, Kristina Sauerwein writes about relationships for Life & Style
Squash that needy inner child. Quit calling yourself an enabler. And don't even mention your co-dependence--unless you want to repel a mate or love interest. No more pop-psychology self-analysis. No more blaming relationship problems on long past trauma-dramas or less-than-perfect parents (relax now, moms). None of these excuses will fly in what one expert calls "Do Something" 1995. "Psychobabble is dead," declares psychologist Pat Hudson, author of "Love Is a Verb," to be published in '95 by W.W. Norton.
MAGAZINE
April 16, 1989
"Latina Nannies/Anglo Families: The Intimate Experiment," by Mary Jo McConahay (Feb. 19), was insightful and thought provoking. You intelligently analyzed the daily-life concerns of and relationships created by child-care issues. Thank you for improving our understanding of such relationships. IM JUNG KWUON Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2011 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Weekend" presents 48 hours in the lives of two gay men who are almost immediately attracted to each other, then have to figure out what that means in the complex tapestry of their individual situations. Written, directed and edited by Britain's Andrew Haigh, "Weekend" is a moving and empathetic look at how relationships develop, at how people fall in love and what that does and doesn't do to their lives. It's an observational film that offers generous satisfactions, but there are challenges along the way. Chief among those is the film's unblinking sexual candor, in language even more than action.
MAGAZINE
May 3, 1992
Until men escape the master-slave perspective of male-female relationships, violence against women will continue to be the cancer it is. MIMI MERRILL Ridgecrest
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