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SCIENCE
January 14, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
If only they had been there in 1939: Plugging in numbers representing the friendliness between pairs of nations at the outset of World War II, researchers at Cornell University used a computer program to successfully predict which countries joined the Allied Powers and which lined up with the Axis. They got all of the countries right except for Denmark and Portugal. The group's work, reported last week in the Proceedings of the National Academies of Science, had less to do with history than with a long-established theory in social psychology called "structural balance," which describes how relationships in a social network evolve over time.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2010 | By Randy Lewis
The facts and mythology of Elvis Presley's life are so far-reaching that they've spawned dozens of books, examining the King of Rock 'n' Roll seemingly from every possible perspective. Except, oddly, for that portion of his audience he arguably was most eager to please throughout his life: women. "I had already done three Elvis books, but I realized, 'Wait a minute -- there hasn't been a book that looked at him almost purely from the female perspective," said veteran music journalist Alanna Nash, author of the new biography published this week, "Baby, Let's Play House: Elvis and the Women Who Loved Him" (It Books, $27.99)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 2012 | By Erin Loury, Los Angeles Times
Growing up in South Los Angeles, Precious Jackson said she was attracted to the bad boys. "My father was a bad boy," she said. He was a hustler, a pimp, a drug addict. But Jackson also saw him as a gentleman who provided for his family. "I chose guys that emulated my dad," she said. The men she dated offered an escape from life with her overprotective grandmother, who raised her from the age of 5. "They had to be from the streets; they couldn't be a square," Jackson said. "I had to have some excitement.
MAGAZINE
October 7, 1990 | DIANE SWANBROW, Swanbrow is a Toluca Lake free-lance writer who has two sisters.
GWEN, 60, HAS SEEN MORE of her older sister Bette, 63, since moving to California several years ago than she did when they both lived in the same state. "I think it's because absence makes the heart grow fonder," Gwen says. "Bette got married when I was 18 and we never spent much time together until I moved out here. She's been here twice to visit, and we spend two or three weeks together--which is about the most time we've spent together in 40 years. We talk a lot about our mom and dad and about old times.
NEWS
December 30, 1994 | KRISTINA SAUERWEIN, Kristina Sauerwein writes about relationships for Life & Style
Squash that needy inner child. Quit calling yourself an enabler. And don't even mention your co-dependence--unless you want to repel a mate or love interest. No more pop-psychology self-analysis. No more blaming relationship problems on long past trauma-dramas or less-than-perfect parents (relax now, moms). None of these excuses will fly in what one expert calls "Do Something" 1995. "Psychobabble is dead," declares psychologist Pat Hudson, author of "Love Is a Verb," to be published in '95 by W.W. Norton.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2010 | By Irene Lacher, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Carlsbad-based self-help guru Deepak Chopra ponders the annual pinnacle for people immersed in self-improvement ? New Year's Day. The prolific author's latest book, "The Soul of Leadership: Unlocking Your Potential for Greatness," hits bookshelves Tuesday. Do you participate in the annual ritual of taking stock at the new year? I take stock every three or four months. Every four months or so, I take a week off to be in total silence, to look back and see what I should be looking at in the future.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2012 | By Jasmine Elist
Known for being “scrupulously unsentimental,” writer Susanna Sonnenberg has turned her sharp eye toward female friendships in the candid memoir “She Matters: A Life in Friendships.” The book, which comes to shelves Jan. 8, describes the missteps, delights, betrayals, and lasting psychological effects of friendships between women. Sonnenberg is no stranger to astutely examining her most intimate relationships: “She Matters” follows “Her Last Death,” the acclaimed memoir that delved deep into Sonnenberg's relationship with her charismatic and destructive mother.  We had the pleasure of chatting with Sonnenberg about the process and challenges of writing an intimate memoir - as well as the emotional significance of the intense bonds between women.  This is the second memoir you have written -- what drives your impulse toward memoir?
HEALTH
June 2, 2012 | By Jessica P. Ogilvie, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In HBO's new show "Girls," creator Lena Dunham conjures up an image of young men so inundated with online porn that they almost unwittingly try to reenact it in their own boudoir escapades. The show is fictional, but Stanford University psychologist Philip Zimbardo believes there's a lot of reality to it. In a new e-book, "The Demise of Guys: Why Boys Struggle and What We Can Do About It," written with Nikita Duncan, Zimbardo theorizes that all those hours spent in front of a screen - not just watching porn but playing video games too - is leaving men in the dust socially, unable to relate to women and unable to function in society.
MAGAZINE
April 16, 1989
"Latina Nannies/Anglo Families: The Intimate Experiment," by Mary Jo McConahay (Feb. 19), was insightful and thought provoking. You intelligently analyzed the daily-life concerns of and relationships created by child-care issues. Thank you for improving our understanding of such relationships. IM JUNG KWUON Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2010 | By Julia M. Klein
An elegant precision informs Sue Miller's fiction, a craft that serves as container and counterpoint to the messy lives and relationships at the core of her work. Miller's ninth novel, "The Lake Shore Limited," belongs to the burgeoning genre of Sept. 11 literature: books that share an interest in grief and social dislocation. But the backdrop here isn't simply one colossal day of destruction. Miller's baby-boomer characters have traversed a long arc of disappointment, from the youthful idealism of the 1970s to the compromises of middle age. Instead of politics itself, Miller has taken as her subject the politics of relationships and the human-scale disasters that flawed men and women inflict on one another.
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