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NEWS
November 18, 2001 | REBECCA COOK, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Small-town schoolteacher Reta Schwisow was 21, married for three months, when she got the news she was dreading: Her husband was missing in action. It was Aug. 10, 1944. Two weeks passed before she learned her 20-year-old husband, Lauren, was alive; it would be almost another year before he was released from a German POW camp and returned to her. That year tested the young couple's strength, as Lauren suffered near-starvation while Reta kept a brave face for her in-laws.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2007 | Mimi Avins, Times Staff Writer
Felicity Huffman is not a relationship expert, nor does she play one on TV. But that's her name on the cover of "A Practical Handbook for the Boyfriend," a cheeky mating manual hitting bookstores this week. Huffman, the Emmy-winning "Desperate Housewives" star, who wrote the book with her best friend, Patricia Wolff, are aware that men don't usually buy that kind of book.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 2007 | David Zahniser and Steve Hymon, Times Staff Writers
Nearly three weeks after Telemundo executives launched an inquiry into Channel 52 anchor Mirthala Salinas' relationship with Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, station officials have yet to ask him about it, Villaraigosa said Monday. The mayor repeated his vigorous defense of Salinas, a Spanish-language journalist who embarked on a romantic relationship with him while she reported on City Hall. He said he still believes the station will find she did nothing wrong.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2010 | By Randy Lewis
The facts and mythology of Elvis Presley's life are so far-reaching that they've spawned dozens of books, examining the King of Rock 'n' Roll seemingly from every possible perspective. Except, oddly, for that portion of his audience he arguably was most eager to please throughout his life: women. "I had already done three Elvis books, but I realized, 'Wait a minute -- there hasn't been a book that looked at him almost purely from the female perspective," said veteran music journalist Alanna Nash, author of the new biography published this week, "Baby, Let's Play House: Elvis and the Women Who Loved Him" (It Books, $27.99)
NEWS
November 25, 2001 | MIMI AVINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A young man learns he has an incurable illness and will soon die. How will he spend the time he has left? More than one television series has milked such a premise, featuring a hero who gorges on experience while the Grim Reaper pursues him as relentlessly as Lt. Gerard dogged the Fugitive. Since Sept. 11, millions of ordinary people have become stars of their own dramas. Everybody knows that no one here gets out alive, but until recently, many people ignored that truism.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 2012 | By Erin Loury, Los Angeles Times
Growing up in South Los Angeles, Precious Jackson said she was attracted to the bad boys. "My father was a bad boy," she said. He was a hustler, a pimp, a drug addict. But Jackson also saw him as a gentleman who provided for his family. "I chose guys that emulated my dad," she said. The men she dated offered an escape from life with her overprotective grandmother, who raised her from the age of 5. "They had to be from the streets; they couldn't be a square," Jackson said. "I had to have some excitement.
NEWS
December 30, 1994 | KRISTINA SAUERWEIN, Kristina Sauerwein writes about relationships for Life & Style
Squash that needy inner child. Quit calling yourself an enabler. And don't even mention your co-dependence--unless you want to repel a mate or love interest. No more pop-psychology self-analysis. No more blaming relationship problems on long past trauma-dramas or less-than-perfect parents (relax now, moms). None of these excuses will fly in what one expert calls "Do Something" 1995. "Psychobabble is dead," declares psychologist Pat Hudson, author of "Love Is a Verb," to be published in '95 by W.W. Norton.
HEALTH
June 2, 2012 | By Jessica P. Ogilvie, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In HBO's new show "Girls," creator Lena Dunham conjures up an image of young men so inundated with online porn that they almost unwittingly try to reenact it in their own boudoir escapades. The show is fictional, but Stanford University psychologist Philip Zimbardo believes there's a lot of reality to it. In a new e-book, "The Demise of Guys: Why Boys Struggle and What We Can Do About It," written with Nikita Duncan, Zimbardo theorizes that all those hours spent in front of a screen - not just watching porn but playing video games too - is leaving men in the dust socially, unable to relate to women and unable to function in society.
MAGAZINE
April 16, 1989
"Latina Nannies/Anglo Families: The Intimate Experiment," by Mary Jo McConahay (Feb. 19), was insightful and thought provoking. You intelligently analyzed the daily-life concerns of and relationships created by child-care issues. Thank you for improving our understanding of such relationships. IM JUNG KWUON Los Angeles
MAGAZINE
May 3, 1992
Until men escape the master-slave perspective of male-female relationships, violence against women will continue to be the cancer it is. MIMI MERRILL Ridgecrest
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