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MAGAZINE
October 7, 1990 | DIANE SWANBROW, Swanbrow is a Toluca Lake free-lance writer who has two sisters.
GWEN, 60, HAS SEEN MORE of her older sister Bette, 63, since moving to California several years ago than she did when they both lived in the same state. "I think it's because absence makes the heart grow fonder," Gwen says. "Bette got married when I was 18 and we never spent much time together until I moved out here. She's been here twice to visit, and we spend two or three weeks together--which is about the most time we've spent together in 40 years. We talk a lot about our mom and dad and about old times.
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NEWS
December 30, 1994 | KRISTINA SAUERWEIN, Kristina Sauerwein writes about relationships for Life & Style
Squash that needy inner child. Quit calling yourself an enabler. And don't even mention your co-dependence--unless you want to repel a mate or love interest. No more pop-psychology self-analysis. No more blaming relationship problems on long past trauma-dramas or less-than-perfect parents (relax now, moms). None of these excuses will fly in what one expert calls "Do Something" 1995. "Psychobabble is dead," declares psychologist Pat Hudson, author of "Love Is a Verb," to be published in '95 by W.W. Norton.
NEWS
May 30, 2013 | By Lisa Wade
In his Op-Ed article this week on hookup culture in college, Bob Laird links binge drinking and casual sex to sexually transmitted diseases, unwanted pregnancies, confusion, low self-esteem, unhappiness, vomiting, ethical retardation, low grades and emotional inadequacy. "How nice of The Times to include this leftover piece from 1957 today," snarked a reader in the online comments.  Fair enough, but Laird is more than out of touch. He also fundamentally misunderstands hookup culture, the relationships that form within it and the real source of the problems arising from some sexual relationships.
HEALTH
June 2, 2012 | By Jessica P. Ogilvie, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In HBO's new show "Girls," creator Lena Dunham conjures up an image of young men so inundated with online porn that they almost unwittingly try to reenact it in their own boudoir escapades. The show is fictional, but Stanford University psychologist Philip Zimbardo believes there's a lot of reality to it. In a new e-book, "The Demise of Guys: Why Boys Struggle and What We Can Do About It," written with Nikita Duncan, Zimbardo theorizes that all those hours spent in front of a screen - not just watching porn but playing video games too - is leaving men in the dust socially, unable to relate to women and unable to function in society.
MAGAZINE
April 16, 1989
"Latina Nannies/Anglo Families: The Intimate Experiment," by Mary Jo McConahay (Feb. 19), was insightful and thought provoking. You intelligently analyzed the daily-life concerns of and relationships created by child-care issues. Thank you for improving our understanding of such relationships. IM JUNG KWUON Los Angeles
NEWS
January 15, 1988
Your Dec. 22 article on Lee Hart convinced me that Gary Hart did the right thing to re-enter the public limelight. It's an opportunity to open up some discussion on contemporary marriage relationships. In this celebrity family, marital indiscretion, a private cancer in so many marriages today, is a public fact. Lee Hart was placed in the typical aggrieved person's dilemma of either deciding to be tough and demanding a divorce or running the danger of being called a wimp. She's done neither.
MAGAZINE
May 3, 1992
Until men escape the master-slave perspective of male-female relationships, violence against women will continue to be the cancer it is. MIMI MERRILL Ridgecrest
HOME & GARDEN
October 27, 2012 | By Lindsley Lowell
I was sitting at La Scala in Beverly Hills with my friend Karen and indulging in my chopped salad obsession. Once again, we were consumed with a question that dominates the conversation of many women. Why am I still single? We consider ourselves among the smart women of the world - and experienced at relationships. We have dated and dated, and then dated some more, all along keeping our standards and scruples intact, which can be a tough feat in Los Angeles. We have tried to "Dr. Phil" ourselves to death in our attempts to identify personality traits that might be sabotaging our love lives.
OPINION
May 26, 2004
A letter writer (May 21) wonders: If same-sex marriage is made legal, what is to prevent persons wanting to engage in polygamous, incestuous or underage marriage from using the "same argument" to ask for legal recognition of those relationships? He then states that no one can answer that question because, he says, there is no answer. There is an answer: They wouldn't be using the same argument. The laws proscribing polygamous or incestuous relationships do not discriminate. No one, straight or gay, may have such relationships recognized.
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