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NEWS
June 18, 2013 | By Jay Jones
A small museum in Guadalupe, Calif ., has unveiled some long-lost relics from Cecil B. DeMille's classic silent movie “ The Ten Commandments .” Most of the massive set remains buried in the coastal dunes outside Guadalupe in northern Santa Barbara County. When DeMille shot the film in 1923, he left behind the towering City of the Pharaoh, which stood 120 feet tall and included 21 sphinxes, each weighing 5 tons. The head from one of those sphinxes, measuring 3 1/2  by 6 feet, was among the artifacts revealed during a celebration on Friday at the Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes Center . It's in a 1910 Craftsman house along Highway 1.  "This is the only set of its type from early Hollywood that still exists,” Doug Jenzen, executive director of the center, said in a news release.
ARTICLES BY DATE
TRAVEL
February 14, 2014 | By David Kelly
BLUFF, Utah - Darkness was falling like a starry curtain as I pulled into this dusty town along the San Juan River. It was mid-November, and a cold wind was blowing in from the desert. The lights of a lone café illuminated a sign ahead. "Bluff, Utah Est. 650 AD. " My search had led me here, to a place where American history stretches deep into antiquity. I was chasing the Anasazi, Navajo for "Ancient Ones," the mysterious people who occupied these harsh lands from the 12th century BC until vanishing 700 years ago. I'd stood in their magnificent Great Houses in Chaco Canyon, N.M., and palatial cliff dwellings in Mesa Verde, Colo.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2012 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
Parishioners at Mission San Buenaventura were stunned by their pastor's announcement at Sunday Mass: Someone had stolen relics from the 230-year-old mission, including two bone fragments from California mission pioneer Junipero Serra and two from St. Bonaventure, the mission's patron saint. In all, nine items were missing, most of them scooped out of a shadow box mounted on the wall of the church's baptistery, a room set apart for baptisms and, at San Buenaventura, normally entered just twice a month.
BUSINESS
December 27, 2013 | Soumya Karlamangla
Mary Michaels keeps a bucket of treats under the counter for people who come in with dogs. She greets customers by first name. A woman walks in the front door just to tell Michaels that she's having a second baby. Michaels owns Almor Wine & Spirits on Sunset Boulevard, a high-end liquor store that her parents opened in 1955. It was in the middle of the booming 1950s, the year that Disneyland opened in Anaheim. Long before the days of BevMo and Costco, Michaels' mother handwrote the store's name and address on hundreds of cards and distributed them around the neighborhood.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2013 | By Jamie Wetherbe
Thieves have again stolen treasures from a colonial-era church in Bolivia, including priceless 18th century oil paintings. The Roman Catholic church in the small town of San Miguel de Tomave has has been looted three times in the last five years - and it's not the only one. Churches in remote towns in Bolivia and Peru are increasingly becoming targets of brazen robberies, the Associated Press reports, with thieves tunneling under walls or...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 2011 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
When archeologist John Foster started peeling the asphalt from a parking lot in downtown Ventura, he knew he wouldn't have to dig deep to find a cache of long-buried relics. He just didn't realize how many he'd find and from how many different eras. "It was layer upon layer," he said this week as he surveyed the emerging foundations of a long-buried, 3-foot-thick mission wall, a span of 200-year-old terra cotta floor tiles laid by Chumash laborers, and a channel fashioned from inverted roof tiles that irrigated a long-dead garden.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 1998 | GEOFF BOUCHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an unmarked graveyard for the cars of killers and dead men, every rusting heap tells a tale of past horrors. The van used by serial killer William G. Bonin to cruise for victims is here, filled with plastic tarps and puddles, but chunks remain from the carpet that linked him to several victims. In another corner of the lot, a knife murderer's keys dangle from the ignition of his rotting car, as if he might return someday and drive off.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2011 | By Nick Owchar, Los Angeles Times
Near the end of "The Leopard," Giuseppe di Lampedusa's 1958 novel about the crumbling Sicilian aristocracy, a priest visits three spinsters to assess the holy relics in the family's private family chapel. The priest determines that, out of all the various bits of bone and other strange objects, some are authentic and should be kept. The rest are thrown away. If author Charles Freeman had been along on that visit, he would have insisted, "Don't throw anything away! Keep everything!"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 2010 | By Martha Groves
It may well be the tamest jail-related riot ever. Two mundane relics from Santa Monica's Depression-era lockup have sparked a frenzy of interest from architectural buffs and home hardware aficionados. In the two weeks since the city announced that it would give away two doorknobs from the shuttered jail, more than 20 people have tried to stake claim to them. By all accounts, the competition is fierce. The lockup, a Moderne-style building that was completed in 1939, was designed by two Los Angeles architects and featured Gladding, McBean ceramic tiles and Stanton Macdonald-Wright murals.
WORLD
March 2, 2009 | Barbara Demick
And the bronze goes to . . . no one. The identity of the bidder who promised to pay the estate of the late designer Yves Saint Laurent $40 million for bronze heads of a rabbit and a rat that had been looted from an imperial Chinese palace was revealed today: an advisor to a nonprofit group dedicated to repatriating missing relics. But the winning bidder, Cai Mingchao, said he had no intention of paying for the heads, which the Chinese government maintain should be returned as stolen property.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2013 | By David Pagel
Feodor Voronov's 10 new paintings at Mark Moore Gallery begin simply: Each starts with a word or a phrase the 32-year-old painter prints, in big block capitals, on raw canvas. Then things get messy. And so animated you won't want to look away. Voronov makes some letters look three-dimensional, as if they were carved from stone, built of bricks or blown up like balloons. The visual kick of graffiti comes to mind, but so does the frilly silliness of doodles, particularly those of daydreaming grade-schoolers.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2013 | By Jamie Wetherbe
Thieves have again stolen treasures from a colonial-era church in Bolivia, including priceless 18th century oil paintings. The Roman Catholic church in the small town of San Miguel de Tomave has has been looted three times in the last five years - and it's not the only one. Churches in remote towns in Bolivia and Peru are increasingly becoming targets of brazen robberies, the Associated Press reports, with thieves tunneling under walls or...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2013 | By Devin Kelly
For hours, the meditation hall at Lu Mountain Temple in the south San Gabriel Valley hummed with muted chatter and camera shutter-clicks. Around the room, glass display cases held translucent urns and miniature versions of dome-shaped Buddhist shrines, or stupas, delicately arranged on burgundy-colored cloth. The urns and stupas held thousands of bright pearl-like crystals believed to be relics of the Buddha, his relatives and his disciples. A wide-eyed Julie Nguyen of Orange County stepped sideways in front of one of the display cases.
NEWS
June 18, 2013 | By Jay Jones
A small museum in Guadalupe, Calif ., has unveiled some long-lost relics from Cecil B. DeMille's classic silent movie “ The Ten Commandments .” Most of the massive set remains buried in the coastal dunes outside Guadalupe in northern Santa Barbara County. When DeMille shot the film in 1923, he left behind the towering City of the Pharaoh, which stood 120 feet tall and included 21 sphinxes, each weighing 5 tons. The head from one of those sphinxes, measuring 3 1/2  by 6 feet, was among the artifacts revealed during a celebration on Friday at the Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes Center . It's in a 1910 Craftsman house along Highway 1.  "This is the only set of its type from early Hollywood that still exists,” Doug Jenzen, executive director of the center, said in a news release.
WORLD
April 27, 2013 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING-- The rabbit and the rat are finally coming home. Two bronze heads that were looted from Beijing's old Summer Palace in 1860 are to be returned to China this year by a French billionaire who acquired them from Christie's auction house, Chinese state media reported. The donation was announced late Friday by Francois-Henri Pinault, heir and chief executive of luxury fashion conglomerate Kering Inc., which is expanding its business in the booming Chinese market. Pinault was part of a business delegation accompanying French President Francois Hollande to China.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2013 | By Chris Megerian, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - Almost three decades ago, as heavy rain threatened to breach the levees protecting the Sacramento area, the state parks department urgently dispatched workers to warehouses holding some of California's most important heirlooms - gold-mining tools, pioneer pottery, antique rifles. They were prepared to load the objects onto trucks and drive them to safety if disaster struck. As luck would have it, the levees held. But despite that scare, the state left much of its collection in those aging warehouses in the West Sacramento flood plain, where it has languished without adequate protection from heat and humidity.
HOME & GARDEN
April 26, 2007 | Kathy Bryant, Special to The Times
SOMETIMES an obsession can start simply enough. In Beverley Jackson's case, it began in 1975 with the desire to walk the Great Wall of China. Few outsiders were allowed into the country at the time, but with a Chinese friend's help she gained entrance as part of a group that included Steve Allen, Jayne Meadows and seven other Americans attending an international carpet fair. "We weren't allowed to be on our own," Jackson says.
WORLD
September 27, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
A coconut shell and other relics from Capt. Bligh's perilous sea voyage after mutineers stole the Bounty were auctioned for $1.1 million. The collection included William Bligh's account of his 41-day journey with loyal seamen from Tahitian waters to Timor with little food or water. The coconut shell used as a cup and bowl by Bligh's party after Fletcher Christian and the mutineers set them adrift in 1789 sold for $111,135.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2013 | By Jamie Wetherbe
A fast-moving fire ripped through the roof of a 107-year-old museum and library in London, threatening an extensive collection of Chinese, African and Roman artifacts and relics. More than 100 firefighters battled the blaze Monday at the Cuming Museum and Newington Library in Walworth in southeast London. The roof of the four-story museum was engulfed in flames Monday afternoon, but the fire was under control by early evening, the Guardian reported . Thirty people were evacuated from the building; no injuries were reported.
SCIENCE
November 30, 2012 | By Kenneth R. Weiss
May gray. June gloom. Even fog in August, some wags call "Faugest. " It turns out that the summertime bane of Southern California beachgoers provides a lifeline for the relic forest of bishop pines on two of the Channel Islands off Santa Barbara. It's not just that the ground-hugging clouds shade these trees from soil-parching sun.  The needles of these pine trees rake the fog, collecting droplets of water that fall to the forest floor. That moisture feeds to soil microbes that release nutrients and allow the trees to grow longer during the dry season, according to a study published in Global Change Biology . Thousands of years ago, when the climate was cooler and wetter, the bishop pines proliferated throughout Southern California and even into Mexico, scientists believe.
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