Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRelief Iraq
IN THE NEWS

Relief Iraq

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 9, 1991
Baghdad called for a U.N. probe of the allies' bombing Jan. 21 of what it called an INFANT FORMULA FACTORY. The allies say the factory produced biological weapons. UNICEF said it hopes to send a convoy from Iran to Baghdad next week with $500,000 in medical supplies for Iraqi women and children. U.N. Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar said reports of civilian casualties have filled him "with anguish and regret."
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
December 18, 2003 | From Associated Press
President Bush's envoy to Iraq received support Wednesday from Italian Premier Silvio Berlusconi for a plan to relieve Baghdad's huge debt burden, adding another European nation to the list supporting the U.S. goal. Former Secretary of State James A. Baker III was already upbeat after winning support from Germany and France this week, the first concrete cooperation in rebuilding Iraq from two nations that fiercely opposed the U.S.-led war.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 17, 1991 | Reuters
The Moroccan Red Crescent has collected $2 million to help finance relief aid for Iraq, the official news agency MAP reported Saturday.
NEWS
April 13, 2003 | Warren Vieth, Times Staff Writer
The world's wealthiest countries agreed Saturday on the need to reduce or restructure Iraq's massive foreign debt, but they insisted on giving the United Nations a central role in setting the rules of postwar reconstruction. The agreements reached by the United States and key allies, including war critics France and Germany, help pave the way for international participation in a rebuilding effort expected to cost as much as $100 billion over several years.
WORLD
December 18, 2003 | From Associated Press
President Bush's envoy to Iraq received support Wednesday from Italian Premier Silvio Berlusconi for a plan to relieve Baghdad's huge debt burden, adding another European nation to the list supporting the U.S. goal. Former Secretary of State James A. Baker III was already upbeat after winning support from Germany and France this week, the first concrete cooperation in rebuilding Iraq from two nations that fiercely opposed the U.S.-led war.
NEWS
September 19, 1990 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Calling for strict controls over any shipments of humanitarian aid to Iraq, President Bush declared Tuesday that "we cannot allow Saddam Hussein to divert needed humanitarian aid in order to sustain his army of occupation." Such shipments "must be distributed under strict international supervision," he said.
NEWS
April 13, 2003 | Warren Vieth, Times Staff Writer
The world's wealthiest countries agreed Saturday on the need to reduce or restructure Iraq's massive foreign debt, but they insisted on giving the United Nations a central role in setting the rules of postwar reconstruction. The agreements reached by the United States and key allies, including war critics France and Germany, help pave the way for international participation in a rebuilding effort expected to cost as much as $100 billion over several years.
FOOD
April 2, 2003 | Charles Perry
9000-8000 BC: Wheat domesticated in the foothills of the Fertile Crescent. First bread is probably an accident -- porridge falls on a hot hearthstone and stiffens. 4000 BC: Risen bread invented in Egypt. Oven develops from a temporary cover set over the hearthstone to retain its heat. 2000 BC: Professional bakers working in Egypt; eventually more than 70 varieties of bread are known there.
WORLD
December 17, 2003 | Sonni Efron and Sebastian Rotella, Times Staff Writers
In the strongest sign yet that antiwar European leaders are prepared to help rebuild Iraq's devastated economy, France and Germany issued a joint statement with the United States on Tuesday, saying the three nations would work together to provide "substantial" debt relief for Iraq. None of the countries said how much of Iraq's estimated $120-billion debt might be restructured or forgiven.
WORLD
July 12, 2004 | Paul Richter, Times Staff Writer
Amid continuing efforts by the Bush administration to build international support for its mission in Iraq, countries have provided only a small fraction of the reconstruction aid they promised at a conference nine months ago. Of the $13 billion in non-American aid pledged, only about $1 billion has been turned over to the U.N. and World Bank funds set up to take in most of the donations, U.S. and international aid officials said.
NEWS
March 17, 1991 | Reuters
The Moroccan Red Crescent has collected $2 million to help finance relief aid for Iraq, the official news agency MAP reported Saturday.
NEWS
February 9, 1991
Baghdad called for a U.N. probe of the allies' bombing Jan. 21 of what it called an INFANT FORMULA FACTORY. The allies say the factory produced biological weapons. UNICEF said it hopes to send a convoy from Iran to Baghdad next week with $500,000 in medical supplies for Iraqi women and children. U.N. Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar said reports of civilian casualties have filled him "with anguish and regret."
NEWS
September 19, 1990 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Calling for strict controls over any shipments of humanitarian aid to Iraq, President Bush declared Tuesday that "we cannot allow Saddam Hussein to divert needed humanitarian aid in order to sustain his army of occupation." Such shipments "must be distributed under strict international supervision," he said.
NEWS
October 8, 1994 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By sending some of his best troops south toward the border with Kuwait, Iraqi President Saddam Hussein seems to have shattered his country's hope of having the United Nations lift the sanctions that have devastated its economy. Word of the troop movements came Friday as Iraq's top diplomat, Deputy Prime Minister Tarik Aziz, was appealing to the United Nations to lift the sanctions, which he said are responsible for growing malnutrition, inadequate medical care and widespread suffering.
NEWS
April 3, 2003 | Gerald Martone and James M. Stubenrauch
In humanitarian aid as in medicine, the first principle should be: Do no harm. As we prepare to send humanitarian relief to Iraq, the record of past food-aid operations in Afghanistan, Sudan, Somalia, Ethiopia and other countries suggests that certain bitter lessons may not have been learned well enough. In the short term, Iraqis in some areas of the country will need supplemental food and water.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|