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Relief Organizations Los Angeles

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1996
To commemorate the second anniversary of democratic elections in South Africa, a local relief organization and a group of entertainment industry professionals packed a 10-ton container in Wilmington full of medical supplies Thursday that will be shipped to the Province of the Eastern Cape. Artists for a New South Africa, founded by actors Alfre Woodard and C.C.H.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1996
To commemorate the second anniversary of democratic elections in South Africa, a local relief organization and a group of entertainment industry professionals packed a 10-ton container in Wilmington full of medical supplies Thursday that will be shipped to the Province of the Eastern Cape. Artists for a New South Africa, founded by actors Alfre Woodard and C.C.H.
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NEWS
July 9, 1993 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Hurricane Calvin diminished in intensity Thursday, efforts to assist storm victims escalated in the Los Angeles area, home to the nation's largest Mexican expatriate community. "People have been calling all day, wondering what they can give," said Hortencia Magana, who heads the social services arm of the Casa del Mexicano, an East Los Angeles civic group that is one of several groups soliciting assistance.
NEWS
January 19, 1995
A number of local organizations have set up funds and/or donation centers to help victims of the Japanese earthquake. A partial list follows: * The American Red Cross is accepting money for the Japanese Relief Fund. Send checks to 2700 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles, Calif. 90057, or charge donations by calling (800) 842-2200. * The Salvation Army is accepting donations earmarked for Japan Earthquake Relief. Mail contributions to 900 W. 9th St., Los Angeles, Calif. 90015, or call (800) 725-9005.
NEWS
January 19, 1995
A number of local organizations have set up funds and/or donation centers to help victims of the Japanese earthquake. A partial list follows: * The American Red Cross is accepting money for the Japanese Relief Fund. Send checks to 2700 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles, Calif. 90057, or charge donations by calling (800) 842-2200. * The Salvation Army is accepting donations earmarked for Japan Earthquake Relief. Mail contributions to 900 W. 9th St., Los Angeles, Calif. 90015, or call (800) 725-9005.
NEWS
January 21, 1993 | KATHLEEN HENDRIX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Arms folded firmly across her chest, her look stern and wary, Patricia Villatoro sits on a metal folding chair at El Rescate, a service agency for Latinos in the Pico-Union area. Years of danger, hardship and heartache have settled into her face. And yet, she occasionally softens. In those moments, dimples dominate her smile and she becomes a young, pretty, 28-year-old woman whose obligations and ambitions pull her in two directions.
FOOD
May 7, 2003 | Russ Parsons
GROWERS from the Santa Monica farmers market and some of the chefs who patronize them will be among those donating their services to a special fund-raising dinner for the hunger relief group Share Our Strength on May 28. The event, part of a series of Taste of the Nation dinners taking place across the country, will feature such market regulars as T. Nicholas Peter from the Little Door, Joe Miller from Joe's, Mario Perez from Zax, Suzanne Tracht from Jar and Scooter Kanfer from the House.
NEWS
February 6, 1992 | BEA MAXWELL
Thanks to the foresight and generosity of Edna and Mickey Weiss, founders of the Charitable Distribution Facility at the Los Angeles Wholesale Produce Market, about 15.4 million pounds of fresh produce were distributed to more than 400 charitable and hunger-relief organizations throughout Los Angeles in 1991. Founded in 1987, it was the first such produce program in the nation. Any nonprofit, tax-exempt organization that feeds the needy or homeless can become eligible for food.
NEWS
December 8, 2001 | JAY LEVIN
Five days before the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, leaders of the major hunger relief organizations in Los Angeles declared a countywide food emergency, an unprecedented event that emerged out of a stark reality: L.A. County on Sept. 6 led the nation in the breadth of its hunger and poverty. Since Sept. 11, the acceleration of suffering has been so alarming that the poor may soon pray for military airdrops of shelters and food. Before the attacks, the United Way described L.A.
BUSINESS
November 4, 1993 | GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Concluding that good will is good business, dozens of area retailers and restaurateurs are offering special credit, discounts and free merchandise and food to the thousands of Southern Californians who suffered losses in the recent firestorms. Merchants said their relief offers are meant simply to help people replace lost items, but they acknowledged that such efforts sometimes help build customer loyalty in the long term.
NEWS
July 9, 1993 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Hurricane Calvin diminished in intensity Thursday, efforts to assist storm victims escalated in the Los Angeles area, home to the nation's largest Mexican expatriate community. "People have been calling all day, wondering what they can give," said Hortencia Magana, who heads the social services arm of the Casa del Mexicano, an East Los Angeles civic group that is one of several groups soliciting assistance.
NEWS
January 21, 1993 | KATHLEEN HENDRIX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Arms folded firmly across her chest, her look stern and wary, Patricia Villatoro sits on a metal folding chair at El Rescate, a service agency for Latinos in the Pico-Union area. Years of danger, hardship and heartache have settled into her face. And yet, she occasionally softens. In those moments, dimples dominate her smile and she becomes a young, pretty, 28-year-old woman whose obligations and ambitions pull her in two directions.
NEWS
September 19, 1993 | ROBERT J. LOPEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
WHEN HE STEPPED OFF A PLANE IN EL SALVADOR IN JULY, leading a delegation of bank officials and economists, Carlos Vaquerano had finally come full circle since fleeing the war-torn country 13 years earlier. Vaquerano, like tens of thousands of other Salvadoran refugees during the 1980s, arrived in Los Angeles to face an uncertain future. He had no idea how long his country's civil war would last, or whether he would ever be able to return.
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