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December 4, 1992 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The general who will command American and U.N. forces in Somalia is a square-jawed Marine whose face became a familiar sight to millions of television viewers during Operation Desert Storm. Lt. Gen. Robert B. Johnston, 55, spent the Persian Gulf War as chief of staff to Desert Storm commander H. Norman Schwarzkopf and conducted most of the televised daily briefings that kept Americans up to date on the battle against Iraqi forces. But Johnston's TV appearances were only a small part of his job.
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WORLD
April 11, 2010 | By Joe Mozingo
Relief organizations on Saturday began to move Haitians from tent camps that are in danger of flooding to new camps on the perimeter of the city, part of a larger plan to decentralize the population after January's devastating earthquake. After a heavy rain the night before, buses carried 62 people from a bedraggled camp on a defunct golf course to a barren field 10 miles northwest of the city. Aid workers helped Romaine Vincent Donal, 44, load her belongings in wheelbarrows.
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NEWS
January 2, 1993 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the sun set on the battered Somali town of Baidoa one day this week, 100 U.S. Marines gathered around Los Angeles' Cardinal Roger Mahony for an evening Mass. "You fellows should understand how this is playing back home," Mahony told the Marines, many of whom came from Oxnard, Mission Hills and other cities in the cardinal's own archdiocese. "You're helping these people. And you really should be proud of that. It's having an enormous positive impact," he said.
NEWS
February 7, 1997 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Senior United Nations and other international aid officials meeting here Thursday suddenly froze in stunned silence when a U.N. security officer angrily accosted others at the table. "How many bodies do you want?" he said emotionally. "We're soft targets! And we make headlines." The outburst highlighted the anguished debate that has erupted here over the role and responsibilities of international aid workers. At issue is whether Rwanda suddenly has become too dangerous for the U.N.
NEWS
December 19, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT and MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Lt. Roy Hollan's machine-gun platoon was backing up a French Foreign Legion reconnaissance mission in a bombed-out neighborhood here a few days ago when his U.S. Marine unit spotted snipers on a rooftop. The Americans raised their weapons, girding for a firefight, until the French commander quickly informed them that the snipers were Legionnaires providing cover for the mission. "Seeing those snipers gave us a start," said Hollan, of Mission Viejo. "We didn't know they (the snipers) were French.
NEWS
February 6, 1997 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Citing a deadly surge of attacks on humanitarian aid groups, the United Nations withdrew hundreds of expatriate and Rwandan relief workers from western Rwanda in armed convoys Wednesday and sharply curtailed operations in the rest of this increasingly tense country. The emergency pullout from four provinces followed the brutal ambush Tuesday of five U.N.
NEWS
January 26, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Several British aid workers left the eastern city of Goma under mounting fear that the army was preparing to launch an airstrike against rebels holding the city. The government, meanwhile, accused neighboring armies of joining the fighting in the east and said drugged children were being used as human shields. The rebels have humiliated the government, seizing a 400-mile stretch along the Burundian, Rwandan and Ugandan borders in the past four months.
NEWS
December 4, 1992 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sgt. Tyler Johnson, 28, didn't know where Somalia was until he was called to a briefing last week and shown a map. On Thursday, however, he and thousands of other Marines and sailors stationed at Camp Pendleton and El Toro were expecting to spend Christmas in that strife-torn East African country, joining other Pendleton Marines now aboard ships in the Red Sea. No official troop-deployment orders came from the Pentagon during the day, even after the U.N.
NEWS
December 3, 1992 | DOYLE McMANUS and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Bush Administration is moving toward agreement on a plan to place Somalia under transitional rule by the United Nations--similar to what is being done in Cambodia--after proposed military operations are over, officials said Wednesday. Although the White House has made no decisions, officials said there is a growing belief in the State Department and National Security Council that the step will be necessary to allow U.S. troops to pull out quickly once the area is secure.
NEWS
February 18, 1993 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees called off a massive relief mission for Bosnia on Wednesday, charging that all factions in the brutal conflict here have "made a mockery" of the humanitarian effort by using aid as a weapon.
NEWS
February 6, 1997 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Citing a deadly surge of attacks on humanitarian aid groups, the United Nations withdrew hundreds of expatriate and Rwandan relief workers from western Rwanda in armed convoys Wednesday and sharply curtailed operations in the rest of this increasingly tense country. The emergency pullout from four provinces followed the brutal ambush Tuesday of five U.N.
NEWS
January 26, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Several British aid workers left the eastern city of Goma under mounting fear that the army was preparing to launch an airstrike against rebels holding the city. The government, meanwhile, accused neighboring armies of joining the fighting in the east and said drugged children were being used as human shields. The rebels have humiliated the government, seizing a 400-mile stretch along the Burundian, Rwandan and Ugandan borders in the past four months.
NEWS
January 25, 1997 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With masks on their faces and silencers on their pistols, assassins in Chechnya broke into an International Red Cross barracks one freezing night before Christmas and systematically murdered six foreign aid workers in their beds. In Rwanda this month, killers inspected the passports of two volunteer Spanish nurses and a doctor at their rural hospital, then coldly executed them.
NEWS
August 2, 1995 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Stop. No U.N. soft-skin vehicles beyond this point without escort. We care for your safety. PAKBAT." As bleeding Bosnia-Herzegovina lurches from crisis to crisis, it is, as ever, hostage this summer to a dangerous checkpoint culture. In the Bosnian outback, it is too often checkpoint-stealpoint: The rule of law becomes tenuous in a country riven by war and ethnic division. Checkpoints are arbitrary, and scary to everyone who must pass through them.
NEWS
June 8, 1995 | SAMANTHA POWER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Muhamed Gucanovic, a 45-year-old trucker, opted not to tell his wife where he was headed at 4 a.m. Wednesday. "It is better she doesn't know," he said with a wink. That's because he was one of five Sarajevans who accepted the United Nations' offer to defy Bosnian Serb threats and drive a convoy of flour, powdered milk and canned vegetables from the Sarajevo airport into the capital's barren relief warehouses--via the deadly Dobrinja suburb.
NEWS
November 15, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Purple wildflowers and weeds now shroud the unmarked mass graves. The once grisly dump trucks cart mounds of garbage, not corpses. Fresh water gushes from countless taps, and the rain-washed air is clean and clear. Ambulances rush the sick to some of Africa's best-equipped hospitals, where they are treated by experts from around the world.
NEWS
November 27, 1992 | ART PINE and MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Bush Administration said Thursday it is "gravely concerned" about efforts by Somali warlords to block distribution of food aid in famine-plagued Somalia and has offered to send up to 30,000 U.S. troops to help guarantee that supplies reach the starving. The troop offer, broached to the United Nations on Wednesday by acting Secretary of State Lawrence S. Eagleburger, awaits a response from U.N. Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali.
NEWS
December 19, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With Operation Restore Hope running smoothly and foreign armies flocking to join it, the commander in chief of the U.S. Central Command said Friday that he may send some American combat troops home early from Somalia and replace them with support personnel. Marine Gen. Joseph P. Hoar said the "significant influx" of other countries wanting to help protect relief food supply lines to starving Somalis "will contribute to an earlier departure (of some American troops) than originally envisioned. .
NEWS
August 28, 1994 | Associated Press
Unidentified attackers stoned a house where 10 foreign aid workers live and fired one shot at the building, raising new security concerns for expatriate workers aiding Rwandan refugees, a U.N. spokesman said Saturday. None of the workers was injured, said Ray Wilkinson, spokesman for the Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees.
NEWS
August 20, 1994 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The weapons exclusion zone decreed around this city in February is so routinely violated now that Bosnian Serbs have been observed training antiaircraft guns on humanitarian relief planes from inside a U.N. artillery impoundment site, a U.N. spokesman conceded Friday. The airlift of food and medicine to the Bosnian capital was suspended late Thursday after a 120-millimeter mortar round fired from another location within the exclusion zone landed on the tarmac of the U.N.-controlled airport.
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