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Relief Organizations Somalia

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NEWS
December 29, 1992 | Times Staff Writer
Cardinal Roger M. Mahony was scheduled to arrive in Somalia today to visit Catholic relief workers at nutrition centers and celebrate Mass for U.S. troops. The Roman Catholic archbishop of Los Angeles left for the famine-ravaged country the day after Christmas and is expected to return Jan. 8. While there, Mahony is scheduled to observe Catholic Relief Services operations. Catholic Relief Services is the overseas and relief arm of the National Conference of Catholic Bishops.
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NEWS
March 28, 2001 | From Times Wire Services
Militiamen ambushed an aid convoy and attacked the compound of a French humanitarian aid group Tuesday, seizing nine relief workers, Somali officials said. A U.N. spokeswoman in neighboring Kenya said early today that five of the workers had been released. Witnesses said at least eight Somalis were killed in the fighting in Mogadishu that stemmed from a feud between two groups, one of which was hired to protect the compound of the aid group Doctors Without Borders.
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NEWS
November 24, 1994 | Times Wire Services
The aid agency Doctors Without Borders evacuated its eight foreign staff members from a southern Somali port Wednesday after a British staff member was briefly kidnaped. The Briton, Tim Boucher, was freed after two hours, but he and other agency workers said they expected all expatriate aid workers to leave Kismayu by the end of the month. They told a news conference in Nairobi it is possible widespread fighting will erupt in Kismayu because of the withdrawal of 1,200 Indian U.N.
NEWS
January 13, 1995 | From Reuters
Nearly a dozen aid agencies suspended non-emergency operations indefinitely in the Somali capital Thursday after kidnapers failed to free a French aid worker held for four weeks. The non-governmental organizations, hanging on in this lawless city devastated by clan warfare, said they closed their doors at sundown until 24-year-old Rudy Marq is freed.
NEWS
December 8, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The price of machine guns plummeted Monday, and the broken dirt tracks leading out of this devastated capital were filled with dozens of "Mad Max" jeeps, bristling with antiaircraft weapons and armed teen-agers in T-shirts, as one of the globe's most impoverished, anarchic spots prepared for the arrival of order. Less than 48 hours before the expected dawn landing of up to 1,800 U.S. Marines on Mogadishu's beachheads, two U.S.
NEWS
January 2, 1993 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mel Foote used to have trouble attracting attention, but Somalia changed all that. Now, a radio station from Baltimore is on the line, a reporter from a national newspaper is stationed outside his office and the calls keep coming in. "I've gotten more attention in the last three months than I've gotten in the last three years," said Foote, coordinator of a Washington-based coalition called Constituency for Africa.
NEWS
March 28, 2001 | From Times Wire Services
Militiamen ambushed an aid convoy and attacked the compound of a French humanitarian aid group Tuesday, seizing nine relief workers, Somali officials said. A U.N. spokeswoman in neighboring Kenya said early today that five of the workers had been released. Witnesses said at least eight Somalis were killed in the fighting in Mogadishu that stemmed from a feud between two groups, one of which was hired to protect the compound of the aid group Doctors Without Borders.
NEWS
February 16, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a midday breeze as hot as the breath of a furnace, a dozen men in calf-length skirts worked slowly across the field, deftly slicing off the ripe heads of yard-high sorghum plants with their daggers. Behind, young boys with metal-tipped hoes followed, hacking down the remaining stalks, dry and brittle as straw, so they could be used later to feed cows and camels.
NEWS
January 13, 1995 | From Reuters
Nearly a dozen aid agencies suspended non-emergency operations indefinitely in the Somali capital Thursday after kidnapers failed to free a French aid worker held for four weeks. The non-governmental organizations, hanging on in this lawless city devastated by clan warfare, said they closed their doors at sundown until 24-year-old Rudy Marq is freed.
NEWS
December 25, 1992 | RAY TESSLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The shrunken peanut of a boy with the haunting big eyes stared vacantly while the mother who had somehow saved him from starvation and bullets for a year gently cradled him in her lap. Although he is eating now in this hot, overcrowded refugee village 20 miles outside of Baidoa, chronic malnutrition has left the 2-year-old child with the frail, tiny-boned body of a 6-month-old baby.
NEWS
November 24, 1994 | Times Wire Services
The aid agency Doctors Without Borders evacuated its eight foreign staff members from a southern Somali port Wednesday after a British staff member was briefly kidnaped. The Briton, Tim Boucher, was freed after two hours, but he and other agency workers said they expected all expatriate aid workers to leave Kismayu by the end of the month. They told a news conference in Nairobi it is possible widespread fighting will erupt in Kismayu because of the withdrawal of 1,200 Indian U.N.
NEWS
February 14, 1994 | From Times Wire Services
Gunmen kidnaped two Italian aid workers Sunday, and an Egyptian peacekeeper was killed and another wounded in an ambush of their military convoy. Maj. Chris Budge, a U.N. spokesman, said aid workers Sergio Passatore and Gianfranco Stefan were kidnaped at Jowhar, about 50 miles north of Mogadishu. They were believed to be working for the Italian charity European Committee for Agricultural Training. The Egyptians were attacked on the bypass road linking U.N.
NEWS
February 16, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a midday breeze as hot as the breath of a furnace, a dozen men in calf-length skirts worked slowly across the field, deftly slicing off the ripe heads of yard-high sorghum plants with their daggers. Behind, young boys with metal-tipped hoes followed, hacking down the remaining stalks, dry and brittle as straw, so they could be used later to feed cows and camels.
NEWS
January 2, 1993 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mel Foote used to have trouble attracting attention, but Somalia changed all that. Now, a radio station from Baltimore is on the line, a reporter from a national newspaper is stationed outside his office and the calls keep coming in. "I've gotten more attention in the last three months than I've gotten in the last three years," said Foote, coordinator of a Washington-based coalition called Constituency for Africa.
NEWS
December 29, 1992 | Times Staff Writer
Cardinal Roger M. Mahony was scheduled to arrive in Somalia today to visit Catholic relief workers at nutrition centers and celebrate Mass for U.S. troops. The Roman Catholic archbishop of Los Angeles left for the famine-ravaged country the day after Christmas and is expected to return Jan. 8. While there, Mahony is scheduled to observe Catholic Relief Services operations. Catholic Relief Services is the overseas and relief arm of the National Conference of Catholic Bishops.
NEWS
December 25, 1992 | RAY TESSLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The shrunken peanut of a boy with the haunting big eyes stared vacantly while the mother who had somehow saved him from starvation and bullets for a year gently cradled him in her lap. Although he is eating now in this hot, overcrowded refugee village 20 miles outside of Baidoa, chronic malnutrition has left the 2-year-old child with the frail, tiny-boned body of a 6-month-old baby.
NEWS
December 21, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In this remote town far beyond the front lines of Operation Restore Hope, Osman Dial Mohamed used a tree branch Sunday to stir giant vats of rice and beans for Somalis waiting anxiously for American troops to deliver them from starvation. Several thousand hungry Somali women and children crowded around him at the Red Cross feeding center here shouting "Osman!" "Osman!" as Mohamed scooped food into their buckets, teapots, cooking oil cans and baskets.
NEWS
February 14, 1994 | From Times Wire Services
Gunmen kidnaped two Italian aid workers Sunday, and an Egyptian peacekeeper was killed and another wounded in an ambush of their military convoy. Maj. Chris Budge, a U.N. spokesman, said aid workers Sergio Passatore and Gianfranco Stefan were kidnaped at Jowhar, about 50 miles north of Mogadishu. They were believed to be working for the Italian charity European Committee for Agricultural Training. The Egyptians were attacked on the bypass road linking U.N.
NEWS
December 21, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In this remote town far beyond the front lines of Operation Restore Hope, Osman Dial Mohamed used a tree branch Sunday to stir giant vats of rice and beans for Somalis waiting anxiously for American troops to deliver them from starvation. Several thousand hungry Somali women and children crowded around him at the Red Cross feeding center here shouting "Osman!" "Osman!" as Mohamed scooped food into their buckets, teapots, cooking oil cans and baskets.
NEWS
December 8, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The price of machine guns plummeted Monday, and the broken dirt tracks leading out of this devastated capital were filled with dozens of "Mad Max" jeeps, bristling with antiaircraft weapons and armed teen-agers in T-shirts, as one of the globe's most impoverished, anarchic spots prepared for the arrival of order. Less than 48 hours before the expected dawn landing of up to 1,800 U.S. Marines on Mogadishu's beachheads, two U.S.
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