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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1998
About 70 general relief recipients demonstrated at the Department of Children and Family Services to protest the county's practice of using temporary agency workers to fill job vacancies. The group marched into the department's Los Angeles administrative offices at 550 S. Vermont Ave. and demanded a written commitment to giving workfare workers priority for entry-level jobs.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2014 | By Gale Holland
Los Angeles County has agreed to a $7.9-million settlement with thousands of  people who were knocked off the welfare rolls when general relief grants swelled during the Great Recession, county and plaintiffs' spokesmen said Tuesday. Under the settlement, which must be approved by a judge, the county agreed to stop cutting off recipients' $221 general relief checks for early or unintentional violations of welfare-to-work rules, according to court documents.  At an annual cost to the county of $5.3 million, it also will stop reducing grants if people decide to share housing.
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NEWS
November 5, 1993 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 100,000 general relief recipients, most of them homeless, were put into a Los Angeles County-run, corporate-style health maintenance organization called the Community Health Plan on Sept. 1, and critics say results so far have been disastrous. Bernardine Pregerson, chairwoman of the county Public Health Commission, called the county HMO program "ludicrous." Pregerson made the charge Thursday after hearing critics outline some of the problems being encountered as the county tries to corral general relief recipients, about 64% of whom are homeless, into its managed care program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 2010 | By Alexandra Zavis
Facing record levels of unemployment and looming state welfare cuts, Los Angeles County supervisors Tuesday finalized a plan to begin shifting responsibility for some of the most destitute residents to the federal government. County officials had set aside $7.2 million -- with the expectation of reaping twice that in savings -- to help general relief recipients apply for federal disability assistance or find work. They decided to use the funds to help recipients get into stable housing, locate medical records and obtain the detailed health assessments they need to apply for supplementary security income or veterans benefits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1993
I would like to clarify certain information in your article "County HMO Program for Poor Called Disaster" (Nov. 5). The county has historically provided health care to the general relief population at Department of Health Services (DHS) hospitals and clinics. On Sept. 1, the county's approximately 100,000 general relief recipients were enrolled in the community health plan, a health maintenance organization operated by DHS. While this is a large population to assume at one time, it is a population that was already using the Department of Health Services system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1996
Re "Struggling at Bottom of Welfare System," May 6: While I welcome the exposure your article gave to the struggles of general relief recipients, I am concerned that it unintentionally plays into the popular misconception that general relief is "welfare" or "charity." To the contrary, general relief is work-based program. If you lose your job, exhaust your savings, pensions and unemployment benefits, and cannot find a job, the county may be willing to loan you a maximum of $212 a month, provided you work it off at minimum wage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 1985
As a member of the Orange County Coalition for the Homeless, I was greatly distressed by your article (Aug. 9) on the county's action in raising the general relief grant. It repeats without question the contradictory statements of Larry Leaman, director of the Social Services Agency, that there were few available rooms for rent for the general relief grant of $161, and Supervisor Roger Stanton's statement that "the good news is that the SSA study revealed that 97.4% of all general relief recipients are housed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1997
I'm afraid that "L.A. Activists Denounce Welfare Check Proposal" (Jan. 20) missed the salient point. This plan is part of an ongoing effort by all county departments to change and improve the way services are delivered to the public. These reforms will promote efficiency and increase public safety. Automated delivery of benefit checks at specified outlets is hardly new; food stamps have been issued this way for more than a decade, and the system was expanded to include general relief checks in 1993.
NEWS
December 21, 1985 | DOROTHY TOWNSEND, Times Staff Writer
A Los Angeles Superior Court judge refused Friday to order the county to increase its shelter allowance for general relief recipients, despite arguments from anti-poverty lawyers and local clergy that the present level "violates contemporary standards of decency."
NEWS
May 6, 1988 | Clipboard researched by Deborrah Wilkinson, Henry Rivero / Los Angeles Times
as of March 31, 1988 White: 47% Hispanic: 8 Black: 7 Asian/Pacific Island: 29 Native American: 3 All others: 6 Total: 100% Source: Orange County Social Agency
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2009 | Molly Hennessy-Fiske
With the cost of helping Los Angeles county's welfare recipients expected to hit $1 billion by the end of this fiscal year, county officials are pushing a plan to shift the burden of some of the most hard-core unemployed to the federal government. If they succeed, local taxpayers could save tens of millions of dollars, and thousands of disabled welfare recipients would see their aid more than triple. But the hurdles could prove high. County officials propose spending $7.2 million to help applicants through a notoriously difficult process to qualify for federal disability assistance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 1998 | AMY OAKES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One homeless man who has lived on the streets of the San Fernando Valley for three years said losing his General Relief benefits has left him more adrift than ever. The assistance, which ended July 1 because of a new five-month limit, was all the income he had aside from the few dollars he gets from recycling cans. "Now, without the $220 a month, I'm out in the middle of the stream," said the 61-year-old Nevada native, "and I don't have the power to get to either bank."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1998
About 70 general relief recipients demonstrated at the Department of Children and Family Services to protest the county's practice of using temporary agency workers to fill job vacancies. The group marched into the department's Los Angeles administrative offices at 550 S. Vermont Ave. and demanded a written commitment to giving workfare workers priority for entry-level jobs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1997
I'm afraid that "L.A. Activists Denounce Welfare Check Proposal" (Jan. 20) missed the salient point. This plan is part of an ongoing effort by all county departments to change and improve the way services are delivered to the public. These reforms will promote efficiency and increase public safety. Automated delivery of benefit checks at specified outlets is hardly new; food stamps have been issued this way for more than a decade, and the system was expanded to include general relief checks in 1993.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 1997 | PAUL FREESE Jr., Paul Freese Jr. is a Public Counsel attorney who specializes in legal issues affecting the homeless
Announcing his broad-ranging welfare reform plan, Gov. Pete Wilson proclaimed that there is "a lot more dignity in any minimum-wage job than sitting on a couch collecting welfare." Yet one of the keystones of Wilson's plan would eliminate work along with welfare. General Relief, as the state-mandated General Assistance program is known in Los Angeles County, provides hope for the most destitute people in our society; it also generally requires those people to work for the money.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1996
Re "Struggling at Bottom of Welfare System," May 6: While I welcome the exposure your article gave to the struggles of general relief recipients, I am concerned that it unintentionally plays into the popular misconception that general relief is "welfare" or "charity." To the contrary, general relief is work-based program. If you lose your job, exhaust your savings, pensions and unemployment benefits, and cannot find a job, the county may be willing to loan you a maximum of $212 a month, provided you work it off at minimum wage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1985 | JOHN NEEDHAM, Times Staff Writer
The county Board of Supervisors on Thursday increased the maximum monthly payment to individuals from the general relief welfare program from $240 to $289 to cover the high costs of housing. The board also approved a shift in administration of the fund by the county Social Services Agency to let recipients split the payments for food, shelter or other necessities as they wish. The increase was approved on the second day of hearings on the county's proposed $1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2014 | By Gale Holland
Los Angeles County has agreed to a $7.9-million settlement with thousands of  people who were knocked off the welfare rolls when general relief grants swelled during the Great Recession, county and plaintiffs' spokesmen said Tuesday. Under the settlement, which must be approved by a judge, the county agreed to stop cutting off recipients' $221 general relief checks for early or unintentional violations of welfare-to-work rules, according to court documents.  At an annual cost to the county of $5.3 million, it also will stop reducing grants if people decide to share housing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 1993
Living on $212 a month in Los Angeles is a true definition of hardship. Yet more than 100,000 very poor men and women who depend on the county's general relief program are expected to keep a roof over their heads on that amount. The stipend was recently cut from $293 because of the county budget crunch.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1993
I would like to clarify certain information in your article "County HMO Program for Poor Called Disaster" (Nov. 5). The county has historically provided health care to the general relief population at Department of Health Services (DHS) hospitals and clinics. On Sept. 1, the county's approximately 100,000 general relief recipients were enrolled in the community health plan, a health maintenance organization operated by DHS. While this is a large population to assume at one time, it is a population that was already using the Department of Health Services system.
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