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SPORTS
September 1, 1990
Mike Schiefelbein of Littleton, Colo., allowed just two hits through five innings to lead the United States to a 10-0 win over Mexico in second-round play in the World Junior Baseball Championship in Havana on Friday. Schiefelbein's second win of the tournament was aided by former Hart High standout Andrew Lorraine of Valencia, who pitched two innings of one-hit relief. The United States, seeking its third consecutive world championship, will play Venezuela today in another second-round game.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1998 | MIKE R. BOWLIN, Mike R. Bowlin is chairman and chief executive officer of Arco
President Clinton appears to have resolved a long-running dispute between the United States and the European Union with his promise to waive U.S. sanctions against foreign firms doing business in Cuba, Iran and Libya. The administration's agreement with the European Union, which Clinton and British Prime Minister Tony Blair announced on May 18, could represent more than an easing of tensions among allies. It could serve to initiate a break in the 20-year-long deadlock in U.S.- Iranian relations.
WORLD
February 6, 2005 | Janet Stobart, Times Staff Writer
British Chancellor of the Exchequer Gordon Brown said he had won the support of finance ministers from the world's wealthiest nations Saturday for his plan to offer debt relief to the world's poorest countries, but the United States balked at some elements of the package.
NEWS
May 5, 2000 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two months ago, after a $130-million rescue and relief effort, helicopters plucked the last survivors from trees and rooftops above Mozambique's flood waters. Then came a less poignant crisis as people began returning from tent cities to their flood-ravaged villages with little aid to start anew. "Without adequate living conditions, those people could be in more danger now than they were on their roofs," Mozambican President Joaquim Chissano said this week.
OPINION
August 11, 2002 | CHARLES DUELFER, Charles Duelfer is a guest scholar at the Center for Strategic and International Studies and former deputy chairman of the U.N. Special Commission on Iraq.
Saddam Hussein certainly understands now that it was a blunder to invade Kuwait before his scientists had finished building a nuclear weapon. As weapons inspectors later learned, the Iraqis were much closer to that goal than had been suspected. Hussein surely also realizes that there would be no talk of invasion now if he could threaten American forces or Israel with nuclear incineration.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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