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OPINION
June 6, 1999
Your May 30 commentary by John Tirman ("Heroes Who Have No Day") was long overdue. He is correct in saying that the relief and aid workers do not need a holiday in their honor. Holidays are decreed by governments, and when a government officially recognizes an organization, function, etc., the next step is to control it. The inevitable result is to subvert or destroy it. It is, however, the duty of the various news media to ensure adequate and unbiased coverage of these heroes, thereby increasing the voluntary monetary contributions that sustain them, and I emphasize voluntary.
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WORLD
October 14, 2013 | By Patrick J. McDonnell and Nabih Bulos
BEIRUT -- Three kidnapped International Committee of the Red Cross staff members and a volunteer from the Syrian Arab Red Crescent were released Monday, a day after they were seized in northern Syria, ICRC officials said. Three other Red Cross workers remain captive in Syria, spokeswoman Anastasia Isyuk said in a telephone interview from the agency's headquarters in Geneva. No other details were provided about the release. On Sunday, gunmen in Syria's Idlib province waylaid a humanitarian convoy and abducted the six Red Cross personnel and the Red Crescent volunteer.
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NEWS
August 4, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Frederic Malardeau, 35, of France and Michael Penrose, 24, of Britain, two international relief workers, were kidnapped a week ago by armed men in Grozny, the capital of the breakaway Chechen republic, aid officials said. The two work for International Action Against Hunger. The Chechen rebel command told the Interfax news agency that its fighters were not involved.
NATIONAL
November 1, 2012 | By Seema Mehta and Kathleen Hennessey
BRIGANTINE, N.J. - As relief workers began clearing up the devastation of Hurricane Sandy, President Obama and Mitt Romney avoided overt partisan politics Wednesday. But with a mere six days to go before election day, and early voting underway across the nation, it was impossible to view the men's actions without a political lens. Obama traveled to New Jersey to survey damage and appear alongside Gov. Chris Christie, a Republican who is among Romney's highest-profile surrogates and who typically offers scathing criticism of the president.
NEWS
October 12, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
Rival leaders assembled in the north in a new alliance against the advancing Taliban army, while international aid groups, fearing a new military onslaught, evacuated foreign staff from the capital, Kabul. At least 36 foreign aid workers were flown out of Kabul's rocket-scarred airport to neighboring Pakistan.
WORLD
June 6, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
A rebel group in Sudan's Darfur region has kidnapped 16 relief workers from international aid organizations, a government official said. The Sudan People's Liberation Army seized the hostages Friday in Mellit, 30 miles north of Fasher, the regional capital, the official said. The kidnapping comes just days after the government had relaxed restrictions on access of humanitarian aid organizations to Darfur. Three of the relief workers are foreigners, and the rest are Sudanese.
NEWS
January 3, 1999 | From Associated Press
In another move toughening Iraq's stand against the West after last month's bombardments, the government has decided it will no longer accept U.S. and British citizens working for the U.N. humanitarian aid program, diplomats said Saturday. Iraq has told U.N. officials in Baghdad of the decision but has apparently not issued a written directive, the diplomats said, speaking on condition of anonymity.
NEWS
August 22, 1992 | From Associated Press
Just days before U.S.-led allies plan to bar Iraqi aircraft from the south, a senior U.N. official failed Friday to persuade Iraq to allow relief workers and armed guards to remain in the country. U.N. officials said Jan Eliasson, who had held five days of talks in Baghdad, will leave today for London to brief Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali. Eliasson, a Swede, is the U.N. undersecretary general for humanitarian affairs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1998 | DIANE WEDNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
While the nation has been riveted to the television set watching Mother Nature unleash her fury this winter, American Red Cross workers Frank Glorioso and Pat Gise rolled up their sleeves and pitched in with relief efforts in the West Pacific, where Typhoon Keith tore through the island of Saipan in November, destroying or damaging more than 700 homes and disrupting countless lives.
NEWS
November 17, 1989 | From Reuters
Twelve foreign relief workers, including four Americans, were detained by Salvadoran authorities after they took refuge in a Lutheran church following the murder of six Jesuit priests, church officials in the United States said today. Kathryn Lee, a Lutheran church official in Chicago, said that Salvadoran agents entered a Lutheran church Thursday evening and seized the 12. She identified two of the Americans as Tom Gabriel, a nurse, and Paula Brentlinger, a medical worker.
NATIONAL
April 30, 2011 | By Carol J. Williams and Esmeralda Bermudez, Los Angeles Times
The scope of devastation left by the second-deadliest tornado blast in U.S. history continued to emerge Saturday as stunned survivors combed the wreckage of homes churned into matchsticks and aid workers and volunteers struggled to get food, water and generators to thousands displaced across seven Southern states. Hundreds who spent the night in emergency shelters hastily erected in hardest-hit Tuscaloosa, Ala., scoured the remnants of their homes and businesses for photos and keepsakes, mostly in vain.
WORLD
March 12, 2011 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Japan has sent thousands of rescue workers to the northeastern coastal area devastated by Friday's earthquake, including officials attempting to prevent a meltdown at a nuclear reactor damaged in the quake. The death toll from the 8.9-magnitude quake and associated tsunami reached 680 Saturday and may reach 1,000, according to Japanese public broadcaster NHK. According to official figures, 642 people are missing and 1,426 injured. Photos: Scenes from the earthquake Officials in Miyagi prefecture said 10,000 residents, more than half the population of the town of Minami-Sanriku, couldn't be located after the earthquake, NHK reported.
WORLD
May 23, 2010 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
Searchers combed a steep, wooded hillside in southern India on Saturday for the remains of 158 passengers and crew of an Air India Express flight and clues to the cause of the country's worst aviation accident in a decade. With the voice recorder not yet recovered, it was unclear why Flight IX-812, carrying mostly migrant workers returning from the Persian Gulf, overshot the runway in Mangalore and plunged down the hillside early Saturday. Officials said the weather was good at the time, and there were no indications of mechanical problems or a communications mix-up with air traffic control.
WORLD
January 18, 2010 | By Scott Kraft
A wrought-iron gate across a two-lane road in the mountains separates two nations speaking two languages and, especially in recent days, living two realities. On Monday, dozens of vans carrying relief workers and trucks laden with emergency food, water and other supplies kicked up dust as they arrived here from the sleepy capital of the Dominican Republic and crossed into Haiti, bound for earthquake victims in Port-au-Prince. Coming in the other direction were several hundred Haitians, seeking permission to enter the Dominican Republic.
WORLD
January 17, 2010 | By Tina Susman and Tracy Wilkinson and Mark Silva
Reporting from Port-Au-Prince, Haiti, and Washington -- For the first time since a catastrophic earthquake shuddered across Haiti last week, there were real signs of relief Saturday, with U.S. helicopters ferrying emergency supplies from an aircraft carrier off the coast and bulldozers taking to the streets of Port-au-Prince to shove through mountains of debris. But there also were signs of the immense problems ahead: the stench of decaying bodies rising from neighborhoods; the sprawling tent cities that have sprung up across the capital; the challenge of getting help to people in the face of the breathtaking scale of destruction and need.
WORLD
May 24, 2008 | From a Times Staff Writer
Declaring a breakthrough for stalled cyclone relief efforts, U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said Myanmar's leader had agreed Friday to ease restrictions on foreign aid workers. Senior Gen. Than Shwe agreed to "allow all aid workers regardless of nationalities" so they could "reach all these areas where needy people are still awaiting our help," Ban said. Than Shwe also said the Yangon airport would be a hub for relief deliveries, Ban said. The United Nations chief said Than Shwe took "quite a flexible position on this matter" during their meeting in front of several generals in the military government's remote new capital, Naypyidaw.
NEWS
March 2, 1988 | Associated Press
Muslim kidnapers freed two Scandinavian U.N. relief workers Tuesday, nearly a month after they were seized in southern Lebanon, and left a note saying the hostages were "proved innocent." Also on Tuesday, a statement purporting to be from the kidnapers of Lt. Col. William R. Higgins said the U.S. Marine will be put "on trial" for espionage when his captors finish questioning him. There was no way of authenticating the statement.
NEWS
December 6, 1992 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S.-led troops landing in Somalia will find international relief officials already focusing on that nation's long-term needs even while rushing food to the famished millions. Relief workers, in interviews conducted since President Bush's announcement Friday of military intervention, expressed hope that the international community will look beyond delivery of food and other immediate aid and help begin rebuilding the nation. They also voiced concerns that U.S.
OPINION
May 9, 2008
One hundred million people will go to bed hungry tonight, and some will not wake up tomorrow morning. The U.N. World Food Program has called the sudden run-up in global food prices a "silent tsunami" that threatens the poorest of the poor. Add to food price hikes the devastating cyclone in Myanmar's rice-growing region, which has left perhaps a million survivors homeless, and the result is a global humanitarian crisis that will strain the resources of even well-funded relief groups. We urge all Americans to give now. And we offer this advice on how to give wisely: First, support what our government will not. In the case of hunger, that means directing a portion of your donations to Third World agricultural and sustainable development projects.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 2007 | Larry Gordon, Times Staff Writer
SAN DIEGO -- How much world peace will $50 million buy? That is not exactly the question facing Father William Headley in his first weeks as the founding dean of the Joan B. Kroc School of Peace Studies at the University of San Diego. But Headley is in the enviable position of leading an institution with that amount to train generations of diplomats, relief workers and experts in conflict resolution.
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