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NEWS
January 26, 2001 | From Associated Press
Afghanistan's Taliban rulers have jailed 22 barbers for giving men Leonardo DiCaprio-style haircuts that are deemed offensive to Islam because the long bangs interfere with the ability to bow and say prayers. The hairstyle, referred to among young men in Kabul as "the Titanic," mimics that of DiCaprio in the blockbuster movie.
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NEWS
March 27, 2001 | From Associated Press
Taliban soldiers Monday displayed the yawning alcoves where two soaring Buddha statues once stood, allowing foreigners a first glimpse of the sandstone rubble that is all that remains of the ancient wonders. The larger Buddha, once 175 feet tall, was a blasted heap of stone. The other figure, 120 feet tall, was also gone--except for a few stone folds of its robe.
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NEWS
January 9, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The supreme leader of Afghanistan's ruling Taliban movement warned that any Afghan converting to Christianity or promoting other religions will be executed. In his decree, Mullah Mohammed Omar also warned booksellers that they face five years in prison if they sell material insulting Islam or promoting "wrong beliefs."
NEWS
March 18, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The decision to destroy ancient statues of Buddha was not made by the Taliban's supreme leader but by 400 clerics who debated for months before declaring them idolatrous and "un-Islamic," an information minister said in Kabul, Afghanistan's capital. Some clerics had hoped the statues would be spared, but the ruling could not be reversed, said Qadratullah Jamal, information and culture minister for the ruling Taliban. Mullah Mohammed Omar is the Taliban's supreme leader.
NEWS
March 18, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The decision to destroy ancient statues of Buddha was not made by the Taliban's supreme leader but by 400 clerics who debated for months before declaring them idolatrous and "un-Islamic," an information minister said in Kabul, Afghanistan's capital. Some clerics had hoped the statues would be spared, but the ruling could not be reversed, said Qadratullah Jamal, information and culture minister for the ruling Taliban. Mullah Mohammed Omar is the Taliban's supreme leader.
NEWS
January 4, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A national assembly of tribal and religious leaders moved closer to creating an Islamic state in Afghanistan by banning all non-Muslim groups, according to news reports from Kabul. At the final session of the five-day assembly, the council was prepared to select 20% of its delegates to form the new Afghan Parliament. Meanwhile, several long-range rockets crashed into Kabul, killing at least five people and injuring a dozen others, Defense Ministry sources said.
NEWS
May 4, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 13 of his 16 years, Imamuddin was indoctrinated in communism. Orphaned by the war that killed his parents and nearly 2 million more, he became a child of the ideology that had started it all. And now, it seems, Imamuddin is an orphan once again. For years, Imamuddin's headmaster at Kabul's Orphanage of the Homeland drummed into him the greatness of Marx, Lenin and the Soviet superpower to the north. Twice, the orphanage flew him to Russia, a land he knows better than his own.
NEWS
March 11, 2001 | Associated Press
The Taliban regime has almost finished destroying two towering statues of Buddha and will complete the job soon despite an international outcry, a top Taliban official said Saturday. "We have destroyed 80% of the statues. There is only a small amount left, and we will destroy that soon," said Abdul Hai Muttmain, a spokesman for Taliban leader Mullah Mohammed Omar, who ordered the destruction two weeks ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 1999 | Reuters
The United States released a report on religious freedom worldwide Thursday, concluding that much of the world's population lives in countries in which religious freedoms are restricted. Many of the countries faulted, including China, Afghanistan, Iran and Iraq, regularly show up on the annual U.S. list of overall human rights abusers. But the report also criticized some U.S. allies, including Saudi Arabia and Egypt, for intolerance.
NEWS
May 24, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The old former Communist clicked his plastic worry beads and scowled. It was the precise moment, as it turned out, that Afghanistan's fierce Islamic rebels, who had battled the Soviet-style regime for the past 13 years, won their holy war--swarming the strategic capital with thousands of battle-scarred moujahedeen warriors.
NEWS
March 11, 2001 | Associated Press
The Taliban regime has almost finished destroying two towering statues of Buddha and will complete the job soon despite an international outcry, a top Taliban official said Saturday. "We have destroyed 80% of the statues. There is only a small amount left, and we will destroy that soon," said Abdul Hai Muttmain, a spokesman for Taliban leader Mullah Mohammed Omar, who ordered the destruction two weeks ago.
NEWS
January 26, 2001 | From Associated Press
Afghanistan's Taliban rulers have jailed 22 barbers for giving men Leonardo DiCaprio-style haircuts that are deemed offensive to Islam because the long bangs interfere with the ability to bow and say prayers. The hairstyle, referred to among young men in Kabul as "the Titanic," mimics that of DiCaprio in the blockbuster movie.
NEWS
January 9, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The supreme leader of Afghanistan's ruling Taliban movement warned that any Afghan converting to Christianity or promoting other religions will be executed. In his decree, Mullah Mohammed Omar also warned booksellers that they face five years in prison if they sell material insulting Islam or promoting "wrong beliefs."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 1999 | Reuters
The United States released a report on religious freedom worldwide Thursday, concluding that much of the world's population lives in countries in which religious freedoms are restricted. Many of the countries faulted, including China, Afghanistan, Iran and Iraq, regularly show up on the annual U.S. list of overall human rights abusers. But the report also criticized some U.S. allies, including Saudi Arabia and Egypt, for intolerance.
NEWS
October 22, 1998 | DEXTER FILKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Hotel Intercontinental, gem of a ruined city, exudes a medieval charm. The lobby walls surrendered their photos and portraits to the Taliban religious police two years ago. The drinking and dancing that drew sultans and kings have been replaced by ice water and prayer. At night, the breeze wafts into the Pamir Supper Club through a hole made by a missile, the gap framing a city of twinkling lights and curfew calm.
NEWS
February 28, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Thousands of people watched while a teenage girl, shrouded in a head-to-toe veil, received 100 lashes for walking with a man who was not her relative. The Taliban religious army also publicly amputated the hands of two men convicted of stealing $500 from a shop. Their hands were later displayed to the crowd in the sports arena of Kabul, the capital. Over a loudspeaker a local Taliban leader warned: "This is the fate of anyone who steals."
NEWS
October 22, 1998 | DEXTER FILKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Hotel Intercontinental, gem of a ruined city, exudes a medieval charm. The lobby walls surrendered their photos and portraits to the Taliban religious police two years ago. The drinking and dancing that drew sultans and kings have been replaced by ice water and prayer. At night, the breeze wafts into the Pamir Supper Club through a hole made by a missile, the gap framing a city of twinkling lights and curfew calm.
NEWS
February 28, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Thousands of people watched while a teenage girl, shrouded in a head-to-toe veil, received 100 lashes for walking with a man who was not her relative. The Taliban religious army also publicly amputated the hands of two men convicted of stealing $500 from a shop. Their hands were later displayed to the crowd in the sports arena of Kabul, the capital. Over a loudspeaker a local Taliban leader warned: "This is the fate of anyone who steals."
NEWS
August 7, 1996 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The unsmiling young men in turbans and Muslim prayer caps kicked up dust as they strode through the bazaar, their determination evident in their gait. At one of the street-front stalls, they wheeled, entered and emerged carrying an affront to their interpretation of Islamic morality. It was a small television set, which the mullahs of the Taliban movement have denounced as haram, or impure, because the Hadith--the deeds and sayings of the Prophet Muhammad--contains a ban on images. Since Nov.
NEWS
January 4, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A national assembly of tribal and religious leaders moved closer to creating an Islamic state in Afghanistan by banning all non-Muslim groups, according to news reports from Kabul. At the final session of the five-day assembly, the council was prepared to select 20% of its delegates to form the new Afghan Parliament. Meanwhile, several long-range rockets crashed into Kabul, killing at least five people and injuring a dozen others, Defense Ministry sources said.
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