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NEWS
March 30, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
Police pulled 53 more bodies Wednesday from the house of a leader of a doomsday cult that is suspected of killing hundreds of its members. The house and garden of Dominic Kataribabo of the Movement for the Restoration of the Ten Commandments of God have so far yielded 155 dead, some strangled, some poisoned. The latest exhumations bring to about 800 the number of corpses, among them more than 100 children, found in three mass graves and a burned-out church in southwestern Uganda.
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NEWS
March 31, 2000 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joni Kasigaire is charged with keeping an eye on the 648 religious groups registered in this East African country, including the deadly Movement for the Restoration of the Ten Commandments of God. It is an impossible job, especially when measured against the backdrop of a country short on resources and a populace anxious for a divine escape from everyday difficulties endemic to the world's poorest continent.
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NEWS
September 3, 1990 | From Associated Press
Pope John Paul II on Sunday urged cooperation and brotherhood between Christianity and Islam, two religions with ancient rivalries in Africa. "Religious differences of themselves do not necessarily disrupt life together," the Pope told leaders of the Muslim and other faiths in this East African nation. John Paul said dialogue between Christians and Muslims "is increasingly important in today's world."
NEWS
March 30, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
Police pulled 53 more bodies Wednesday from the house of a leader of a doomsday cult that is suspected of killing hundreds of its members. The house and garden of Dominic Kataribabo of the Movement for the Restoration of the Ten Commandments of God have so far yielded 155 dead, some strangled, some poisoned. The latest exhumations bring to about 800 the number of corpses, among them more than 100 children, found in three mass graves and a burned-out church in southwestern Uganda.
NEWS
April 28, 1989 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, Times Staff Writer
An aide to Pope John Paul II imagines that the Pope has a private map of the world on which all the countries he has visited are carefully colored in, and that in idle moments the pontiff looks mostly at the inviting blanks. The map is doubtless apocryphal, but the musing is pertinent, for it is spring, and by now, everybody around the Vatican knows what that means. This morning, the Pope, his white skirts neatly pressed, his sturdy brown loafers brightly buffed, begins another year of travel.
NEWS
May 8, 1990 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"You want to see the khalif. I myself can arrange it." Sweet words indeed. I had been in Senegal for some time working on an article about the Mourides, the Islamic sect that dominates the country's politics and economy. An audience with the Khalif-General, the recently installed Mouride sheik and son of the charismatic founder Amadou Bamba himself, would be indispensable. But it would not be easy.
NEWS
March 31, 2000 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joni Kasigaire is charged with keeping an eye on the 648 religious groups registered in this East African country, including the deadly Movement for the Restoration of the Ten Commandments of God. It is an impossible job, especially when measured against the backdrop of a country short on resources and a populace anxious for a divine escape from everyday difficulties endemic to the world's poorest continent.
NEWS
January 27, 1990 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a rare rain fell across African islands scourged by drought, Pope John Paul II preached faith, courage and perseverance Friday to a nation without resources whose young people are fleeing abroad. Thousands of brightly dressed people gathered in the drizzle outside this capital for an open-air papal Mass climaxing John Paul's two-day visit to Cape Verde, the first stop on his eight-day trip to five of Africa's poorest lands.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 1991 | RUSSELL CHANDLER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
John Schenk is World Vision's advance man for famine relief in Africa. But the Monrovia-based Christian international relief and development agency is having a tough time catching the ear of the media and opening the wallet of the public. That's especially true of Sudan, says Schenk, where estimates of a possible death toll among the 7 million residents facing a severe food shortage start at 250,000 and climb past 1 million.
NEWS
February 5, 1993 | Associated Press
Pope John Paul II sought common ground with believers in voodoo Thursday, suggesting they would not betray their traditional faith by converting to Christianity. On the second day of his 10th African pilgrimage, the Pope held a dramatic and emotional meeting with priests of the vodun , as the ancestral gods are known in the Fon language. The Catholic church seeks to maintain a dialogue with voodoo followers but frowns on superstitious practices.
NEWS
February 5, 1993 | Associated Press
Pope John Paul II sought common ground with believers in voodoo Thursday, suggesting they would not betray their traditional faith by converting to Christianity. On the second day of his 10th African pilgrimage, the Pope held a dramatic and emotional meeting with priests of the vodun , as the ancestral gods are known in the Fon language. The Catholic church seeks to maintain a dialogue with voodoo followers but frowns on superstitious practices.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 1991 | RUSSELL CHANDLER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
John Schenk is World Vision's advance man for famine relief in Africa. But the Monrovia-based Christian international relief and development agency is having a tough time catching the ear of the media and opening the wallet of the public. That's especially true of Sudan, says Schenk, where estimates of a possible death toll among the 7 million residents facing a severe food shortage start at 250,000 and climb past 1 million.
NEWS
September 3, 1990 | From Associated Press
Pope John Paul II on Sunday urged cooperation and brotherhood between Christianity and Islam, two religions with ancient rivalries in Africa. "Religious differences of themselves do not necessarily disrupt life together," the Pope told leaders of the Muslim and other faiths in this East African nation. John Paul said dialogue between Christians and Muslims "is increasingly important in today's world."
NEWS
May 8, 1990 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"You want to see the khalif. I myself can arrange it." Sweet words indeed. I had been in Senegal for some time working on an article about the Mourides, the Islamic sect that dominates the country's politics and economy. An audience with the Khalif-General, the recently installed Mouride sheik and son of the charismatic founder Amadou Bamba himself, would be indispensable. But it would not be easy.
NEWS
January 27, 1990 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a rare rain fell across African islands scourged by drought, Pope John Paul II preached faith, courage and perseverance Friday to a nation without resources whose young people are fleeing abroad. Thousands of brightly dressed people gathered in the drizzle outside this capital for an open-air papal Mass climaxing John Paul's two-day visit to Cape Verde, the first stop on his eight-day trip to five of Africa's poorest lands.
NEWS
April 28, 1989 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, Times Staff Writer
An aide to Pope John Paul II imagines that the Pope has a private map of the world on which all the countries he has visited are carefully colored in, and that in idle moments the pontiff looks mostly at the inviting blanks. The map is doubtless apocryphal, but the musing is pertinent, for it is spring, and by now, everybody around the Vatican knows what that means. This morning, the Pope, his white skirts neatly pressed, his sturdy brown loafers brightly buffed, begins another year of travel.
OPINION
June 4, 2005
Re "A U.S. Faith Initiative for Africa," May 29: One uses faith to fight AIDS the same way one uses faith to move mountains. When one is without men, dynamite and machines, one uses faith. And when one does not have science and the medicines produced through its use, then you use faith. Robert Wilkins Apple Valley I am sorry to see that the black pastors are so excited about their meeting with Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice. The moment they try to plan programs to prevent the onset or the spread of HIV/AIDS, particularly within married couples, they must talk about condoms or about programs for clean needles.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 1993 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE WRITER
If I could tell you what it meant, there would be no point in dancing it. --Isadora Duncan * Imagine an eight-hour PBS series about dance so dominated by talk that scarcely one full minute of dancing is ever allowed to be seen without voice-over commentary or a cutaway to an interview.
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