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NEWS
March 28, 1987 | Associated Press
A federal appeals court Friday temporarily suspended a federal judge's ruling that ordered Alabama schools to remove 44 textbooks on the grounds that they violated the Constitution because they promoted secular humanism as a religion. The Alabama Board of Education immediately began telling school officials to return the books to students so they can finish the spring semester.
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NEWS
March 28, 1987 | Associated Press
A federal appeals court Friday temporarily suspended a federal judge's ruling that ordered Alabama schools to remove 44 textbooks on the grounds that they violated the Constitution because they promoted secular humanism as a religion. The Alabama Board of Education immediately began telling school officials to return the books to students so they can finish the spring semester.
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NEWS
March 6, 1987
School workers began pulling books from shelves to comply with a federal judge's order banning 45 texts from Alabama classrooms on grounds they promote a godless humanist religion. Meanwhile, a lawyer for 12 parents who joined Alabama as defendants in the case said they would file for a reversal next week with the U.S. 11th Circuit Court of Appeals in Atlanta on the ruling Wednesday by U.S. District Judge W. Brevard Hand.
NEWS
March 25, 1987 | Associated Press
Lawyers for the Alabama Board of Education sent a notice of appeal to the U.S. 11th Circuit Court of Appeals on Tuesday, seeking reversal of a judge's ruling banning 44 textbooks from Alabama public schools for promoting the "religion" of secular humanism. U.S. District Judge W. Brevard Hand banned the books March 4 on grounds that they promoted humanism as a religion, in violation of the U.S. Constitution, which prohibits the government from establishing a religion.
NEWS
March 25, 1987 | Associated Press
Lawyers for the Alabama Board of Education sent a notice of appeal to the U.S. 11th Circuit Court of Appeals on Tuesday, seeking reversal of a judge's ruling banning 44 textbooks from Alabama public schools for promoting the "religion" of secular humanism. U.S. District Judge W. Brevard Hand banned the books March 4 on grounds that they promoted humanism as a religion, in violation of the U.S. Constitution, which prohibits the government from establishing a religion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1987 | United Press International
Two civil liberties groups representing parents of Alabama public schoolchildren said Friday that they will appeal last week's court ruling banning 44 texts that allegedly promote the "religion" of secular humanism. The American Civil Liberties Union and People for the American Way also warned that the decision by U.S. District Court Judge W. Brevard Hand will unleash a host of challenges to public school education by Christian fundamentalists seeking to promote their sectarian views.
OPINION
June 20, 2004
This editorial page rarely sees eye to eye with Justice Clarence Thomas on the Constitution. But in concluding last week that the words "under God" unconstitutionally transform the Pledge of Allegiance into something of a religious incantation, the Supreme Court justice got it right. Half right, anyway. We'll get to the other half in a bit. Thomas' surprising assertion came in his dissent from the court's non-decision last week on the pledge.
NATIONAL
August 28, 2003 | Ken Ellingwood and Rennie Sloan, Times Staff Writers
Workers wheeled a Ten Commandments monument out of the state Judicial Building rotunda on Wednesday, ending a noisy standoff, if not the broader debate over religious displays in public buildings. The 2 1/2-ton monument, at the center of a nationally televised tug of war, was moved to a private room inside the court building to comply with a court order that it be taken from public view.
NEWS
June 5, 1985 | Associated Press
Here are excerpts from the Supreme Court's decision Tuesday that public schools may not set aside daily moments of silence if students are told that "prayer" is one possible activity during the silence. Justice John Paul Stevens, joined by Justices William J. Brennan Jr., Thurgood Marshall, Harry A. Blackmun and Lewis F. Powell Jr.
NEWS
March 18, 1987
A federal judge amended his order banning 44 textbooks from Alabama public schools to permit limited use of four home economics texts. U.S. District Judge W. Brevard Hand rejected pleas of state school officials to allow all 44 to be used for the rest of this school year. Hand ruled March 4 that the 44 books violate the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which prohibits the state from advancing religion in public schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1987 | United Press International
Two civil liberties groups representing parents of Alabama public schoolchildren said Friday that they will appeal last week's court ruling banning 44 texts that allegedly promote the "religion" of secular humanism. The American Civil Liberties Union and People for the American Way also warned that the decision by U.S. District Court Judge W. Brevard Hand will unleash a host of challenges to public school education by Christian fundamentalists seeking to promote their sectarian views.
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