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OPINION
September 9, 2012
Re "Neither party owns faith," Opinion, Sept. 6 Perhaps it's true for Roman Catholics like Rick Cole that the country has "maintained a healthy balance in which faith and politics can interact. " It certainly isn't for those of us who have different values and beliefs than those imposed by the church. The church-state separation not only benefits the religious by allowing them their beliefs, but it also protects the non-religious from the tyranny of the majority. With respect to the civil rights movement, which Cole says could have been far more violent without the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s appeal to Americans' Judeo-Christian values, it was more bloody than Cole remembers.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
October 21, 2012 | By Vincent Bevins, Los Angeles Times
SAO PAULO, Brazil - As euphoric rock music played, dozens of men in suits swarmed the aisles with hand-held credit card machines to take donations from the faithful. The pastor smiled at the crowd in the downtown headquarters of the mega-church and, as cameras rolled, belted out: "We all voted already, right? Who voted today?" In the spotlight, he made no mention of whom he hoped his flock had cast ballots for. But for most in the crowd, and those watching the election for the mayor of Latin America's largest city, it was clear which candidate Brazil's increasingly influential evangelical churches were throwing their weight behind.
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OPINION
June 5, 2011 | Doyle McManus
Of the 44 U.S. presidents, all but a handful have been affiliated with a relatively narrow list of traditional Protestant denominations. Eleven were Episcopalians (12 if you count Thomas Jefferson, whose adult beliefs are a subject of debate), eight were Presbyterians, four were Methodists and four were Baptists. Others included Congregationalists, Dutch Reformed and Disciples of Christ. President Obama attended Trinity United Church of Christ in Chicago, a congregation with traditional Protestant roots despite its untraditional pastor, the Rev. Jeremiah A. Wright Jr. In Washington, Obama has attended services at mostly black Protestant churches.
OPINION
September 9, 2012
Re "Private-equity shenanigans," Editorial, Sept. 6 The kind of tax manipulation you talk about may require changes to the tax code. But the common beliefs that capital gains are only for the rich and that taxes on them only affect the rich are folly. To increase capital gains (and dividends, for that matter) across the board would have huge affects on the middle class as well. Mutual funds, 401(k) plans and other investment plans have trillions of dollars invested by the average worker.
OPINION
June 17, 2011
Religion and politics Re "Old-time religion, today's politics," Opinion, June 11 Tim Rutten has it exactly right about dangerous religious litmus tests for office, just the way John F. Kennedy warned the nation 50 years ago. Kennedy wisely advised the conservative Christian leaders in Houston in 1960 that we all should "believe in an America where the separation of church and state is absolute. " It is far from that today, thanks to opportunistic religious fundamentalist politicians like Rick Perry, Sarah Palin and Rick Santorum.
MAGAZINE
January 10, 1993
If there ever was a time for the Internal Revenue Service to investigate the tax-free status of the Christian Coalition and its clones, it is now. MEL R. KELLS Los Angeles
OPINION
September 9, 2012
Re "The homeless and their stuff," Editorial, Sept. 7 The Times fails to understand that the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals' decision preventing the city from removing abandoned property left on public property impacts all areas of Los Angeles, not just skid row. The decision puts a tremendous burden on city sanitation crews and police to address the accumulation of tons of "stuff" left on sidewalks, parkways and streets. This is an acute problem in many parts of Los Angeles, especially at Venice Beach, where hundreds of young travelers enjoy a meth-fueled lifestyle of beach camping, skateboarding and late-night partying at the expense of local residents who just want to sleep at night.
OPINION
September 9, 2012
Re "Neither party owns faith," Opinion, Sept. 6 Perhaps it's true for Roman Catholics like Rick Cole that the country has "maintained a healthy balance in which faith and politics can interact. " It certainly isn't for those of us who have different values and beliefs than those imposed by the church. The church-state separation not only benefits the religious by allowing them their beliefs, but it also protects the non-religious from the tyranny of the majority. With respect to the civil rights movement, which Cole says could have been far more violent without the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s appeal to Americans' Judeo-Christian values, it was more bloody than Cole remembers.
NEWS
June 5, 2012
There are cocktail lounges that claim to be free of pretense, and then there's the Downtown Cocktail Room. Located in the burgeoning Fremont East entertainment district, this cozy bohemian cocktail room serves up potent handcrafted concoctions from seasonal menus. And while you're imbibing, D.C.R. advises that talk of religion and politics be kept to a minimum. That is, unless you are a priest, rabbi or politician. In which case, they say, it is probably past your bedtime anyway. Downtown Cocktail Room 111 Las Vegas Blvd.
WORLD
May 5, 2012 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
ALEXANDRIA, Egypt - The stage along the sea was a politically crafted advertisement for Egypt's diversity: An unveiled woman chatted with a bearded Islamist and a retired soccer star shared the spotlight with a young hero from last year's revolution. A roar erupted from a crowd, mostly students, when a white-haired man in a linen blazer raised his arms. As fireworks flashed in the night sky, Abdel Moneim Aboul Fotouh called for national unity to end military rule and unrest that have soured the euphoria since Hosni Mubarak was forced from power.
WORLD
April 29, 2012 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
CAIRO - Osama Abdel Hadi was born into the Muslim Brotherhood. His father, a history professor, was respected within the Islamic movement and Hadi grew up steeped in piety and resistance to Hosni Mubarak's secular police state. He prayed in Cairo's ancient mosques and knew the names of Brotherhood members held in Egypt's jails. The group was his spiritual and intellectual buttress, and, amid the failings of other parties and opposition ideologies, he carried the Brotherhood's precepts as he entered university to study political science.
OPINION
October 2, 2011 | By Penn Jillette
Because I wrote a book with "Atheist" in the subtitle and I go on political TV shows to hawk that book, well-groomed meat puppets frequently ask me why politicians like Michele Bachmann and Rick Perry are saying bugnutty Christian stuff. I have an idea why these politicians have gone all religious, but I haven't found a way to explain it in a sound bite, which is why I'm writing this. I think the whole problem comes down to the word "Christian" and what it has come to mean in my lifetime.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 2011 | By Teresa Watanabe, Los Angeles Times
It's third period at Lawrence Middle School in Chatsworth, and social studies teacher Brent Smiley has exactly 50 minutes to cover 9/11. He asks for memories; few of the eighth-graders have any since they were just 2 or 3 years old when the terrorists launched their attacks. He tells them Saddam Hussein was a thug who gassed his own people and that the Taliban oppresses girls. He mentions the heroes of Flight 93. He says the attacks had nothing to do with Islam any more than the Ku Klux Klan reflected Christianity.
OPINION
June 17, 2011
Religion and politics Re "Old-time religion, today's politics," Opinion, June 11 Tim Rutten has it exactly right about dangerous religious litmus tests for office, just the way John F. Kennedy warned the nation 50 years ago. Kennedy wisely advised the conservative Christian leaders in Houston in 1960 that we all should "believe in an America where the separation of church and state is absolute. " It is far from that today, thanks to opportunistic religious fundamentalist politicians like Rick Perry, Sarah Palin and Rick Santorum.
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