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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1994
I found something even more provocative than the main thrust of the April 19 Column One, "Setting the Human Clock Back." It was in the first paragraph: "Berkeley--The path to humanity's origins leads through a side door in a divinity school, down a basement staircase and into the laboratory where, by laser's fierce light, Robert C. Walter is prospecting for time." Religion and science; creativity and evolution all living happily under one roof. The case can be made in the Bible itself: Isaiah 6:11 and 65:25.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 2014 | Elaine Woo
For Ian Barbour, the deadly possibilities of the Atomic Age raised questions that science couldn't answer - a perplexing situation for a young physicist after World War II. He responded to the challenge in an unusual way: After completing his doctorate in physics he enrolled in divinity school and forged a career devoted to bridging the chasm between science and religion. Barbour, whose work opened a new academic field and brought him the prestigious Templeton Prize for Progress in Religion died at a hospital in Minneapolis on Christmas Eve, five days after a stroke, said his son, John Barbour.
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HEALTH
July 6, 2013 | By David Levine
Religion and science have long had disagreements - from Galileo, who was tried for teaching that the Earth was not the center of the universe, to battles over teaching evolution in public schools. But when it comes to greed, religion and science share this view: It is not good for you. "Greed never allows you to think you have enough; it always destroys you by making you strive ever harder for more," Rabbi Benjamin Blech writes in "Taking Stock: A Spiritual Guide to Rising Above Life's Ups and Down.
HEALTH
July 6, 2013 | By David Levine
Religion and science have long had disagreements - from Galileo, who was tried for teaching that the Earth was not the center of the universe, to battles over teaching evolution in public schools. But when it comes to greed, religion and science share this view: It is not good for you. "Greed never allows you to think you have enough; it always destroys you by making you strive ever harder for more," Rabbi Benjamin Blech writes in "Taking Stock: A Spiritual Guide to Rising Above Life's Ups and Down.
OPINION
August 17, 2009
New Atheists: An Op-Ed article Tuesday on the battle between religion and science referred to fanatical Catholics who were addressed by science blogger P.Z. Myers. The word "fanatical" should have been in quotation marks as Myers' characterization.
BOOKS
February 5, 1989
I would like to tell you about my own meeting with myth. As a young child, I liked many kinds of make-believe stories. I think I was about 10 when I discovered mythology, dipping into Edith Hamilton, checking Padraic Colum's "Northern Myths" out of the school library innumerable times, and later moving into the Eddas. My parents taught me, in effect, that religion provides an outline and a reason for creation and that science explains the details. The differences among the "reasons" didn't bother me a bit; I don't think I thought about them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1985
It is either a philosophical mistake or intellectual dishonesty to lump all creationists in with foes of evolution. Unfortunately, fundamentalists have done a great disservice to both religion and science by an irrational attitude toward evolution. They foolishly fail to see that the Bible was never meant to be a book of science. There are some creationists, and I'm one of them, who believe that the world or universe did not come into existence out of nothing. We do not dispute the possibility of evolution, but we assert that it is totally illogical that evolutionary processes came into being without, a First Cause--uncaused in itself, as Aristotle pointed out. It's really tragic that students, through faulty scientific teaching, are led to believe that the theory of evolution contradicts the necessity of a First Cause.
OPINION
January 1, 2008
Re "Rabbi, atheist debate with passion, humor," Dec. 29 The American Jewish University should be commended for sponsoring the debate between author Sam Harris and Rabbi David Wolpe. The debate was very interesting and informative. In a truly democratic society, differences of opinion about religion and science should be openly debated in a respectful public forum. This is greatly needed in today's tense world filled with religious conflicts and intolerance. Harris' bestselling books are an indication that there is popular public interest in these issues.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 2014 | Elaine Woo
For Ian Barbour, the deadly possibilities of the Atomic Age raised questions that science couldn't answer - a perplexing situation for a young physicist after World War II. He responded to the challenge in an unusual way: After completing his doctorate in physics he enrolled in divinity school and forged a career devoted to bridging the chasm between science and religion. Barbour, whose work opened a new academic field and brought him the prestigious Templeton Prize for Progress in Religion died at a hospital in Minneapolis on Christmas Eve, five days after a stroke, said his son, John Barbour.
OPINION
December 7, 2006
Re "Prayer and Prozac make for bad medicine," Opinion, Dec. 2 Richard P. Sloan asserts that there is no room for spirituality in medicine. He supports this with a number of premises, all specious. Sloan argues that doctors delving into the spiritual lives of patients means they do so at the expense of essential medical consultation and that the science on the benefits of prayer and spirituality shows it to be worthless. What he does not say is that able, modern physicians are perfectly capable of managing their time with their patients and recognizing that no two patients are alike.
OPINION
October 10, 2011 | By John H. Evans
Rick Perry has generated a lot of ink lately — for trumpeting his religious faith and for his attacks on evolution and global warming. I have no magic insight into the mind of the candidate jockeying for the GOP nomination, and I'm not a member of the religious right. But, as a sociologist studying religion in the United States, I do know that the fundamentalists and evangelicals who are disproportionately represented in the ranks of Republican primary voters don't all sound like Perry, or Michele Bachmann or Sarah Palin.
OPINION
August 17, 2009
New Atheists: An Op-Ed article Tuesday on the battle between religion and science referred to fanatical Catholics who were addressed by science blogger P.Z. Myers. The word "fanatical" should have been in quotation marks as Myers' characterization.
OPINION
January 1, 2008
Re "Rabbi, atheist debate with passion, humor," Dec. 29 The American Jewish University should be commended for sponsoring the debate between author Sam Harris and Rabbi David Wolpe. The debate was very interesting and informative. In a truly democratic society, differences of opinion about religion and science should be openly debated in a respectful public forum. This is greatly needed in today's tense world filled with religious conflicts and intolerance. Harris' bestselling books are an indication that there is popular public interest in these issues.
OPINION
December 7, 2006
Re "Prayer and Prozac make for bad medicine," Opinion, Dec. 2 Richard P. Sloan asserts that there is no room for spirituality in medicine. He supports this with a number of premises, all specious. Sloan argues that doctors delving into the spiritual lives of patients means they do so at the expense of essential medical consultation and that the science on the benefits of prayer and spirituality shows it to be worthless. What he does not say is that able, modern physicians are perfectly capable of managing their time with their patients and recognizing that no two patients are alike.
NATIONAL
March 10, 2005 | Larry B. Stammer, Times Staff Writer
Charles Townes, the UC Berkeley professor who shared the 1964 Nobel Prize in physics for his work in quantum electronics and then startled the scientific world by suggesting that religion and science were converging, was awarded the $1.5-million Templeton Prize on Wednesday for progress in spiritual knowledge.
MAGAZINE
December 21, 2003
I commend you for publishing the extensive article on Fuller Theological Seminary, and in doing so revealing Pasadena's best-kept secret ("Jesus With a Genius Grant," by Alan Rifkin, Nov. 23). As a former student and now a member of the faculty for close to three decades, I found the piece fascinating and futuristic, while tending more toward a clever parody than an authentic profile. The genius of Fuller is not so much its ability to balance exotic philosophy, ideological ethics and artsy dialogue with contemporary culture.
MAGAZINE
December 21, 2003
I commend you for publishing the extensive article on Fuller Theological Seminary, and in doing so revealing Pasadena's best-kept secret ("Jesus With a Genius Grant," by Alan Rifkin, Nov. 23). As a former student and now a member of the faculty for close to three decades, I found the piece fascinating and futuristic, while tending more toward a clever parody than an authentic profile. The genius of Fuller is not so much its ability to balance exotic philosophy, ideological ethics and artsy dialogue with contemporary culture.
NATIONAL
March 10, 2005 | Larry B. Stammer, Times Staff Writer
Charles Townes, the UC Berkeley professor who shared the 1964 Nobel Prize in physics for his work in quantum electronics and then startled the scientific world by suggesting that religion and science were converging, was awarded the $1.5-million Templeton Prize on Wednesday for progress in spiritual knowledge.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1994
I found something even more provocative than the main thrust of the April 19 Column One, "Setting the Human Clock Back." It was in the first paragraph: "Berkeley--The path to humanity's origins leads through a side door in a divinity school, down a basement staircase and into the laboratory where, by laser's fierce light, Robert C. Walter is prospecting for time." Religion and science; creativity and evolution all living happily under one roof. The case can be made in the Bible itself: Isaiah 6:11 and 65:25.
BOOKS
February 5, 1989
I would like to tell you about my own meeting with myth. As a young child, I liked many kinds of make-believe stories. I think I was about 10 when I discovered mythology, dipping into Edith Hamilton, checking Padraic Colum's "Northern Myths" out of the school library innumerable times, and later moving into the Eddas. My parents taught me, in effect, that religion provides an outline and a reason for creation and that science explains the details. The differences among the "reasons" didn't bother me a bit; I don't think I thought about them.
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