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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1988 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
Manoel Alves de Souza, a Rio lawyer, was a patient in a mental hospital in 1970 when he took the path of Umbanda. One of the hospital's psychiatrists encouraged him to go to an Umbanda worship center for ritual treatment of his illness, Souza recalled. In one ritual, Souza was placed within a circle of fire; in others, he was given herbal baths. Since then, he has been free of mental disturbances and is a faithful believer in Umbanda, he said in an interview. "It helped me a lot.
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NEWS
August 8, 1998 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There is a magic word that Brazilians use to describe their talent for artful compromise. The word jeito translates roughly as a knack for solving problems, whether bureaucratic entanglements or social conflicts. It applies to the melding of religions that allows tens of millions of Brazilians to call themselves Roman Catholics while practicing rites of African origin.
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NEWS
October 5, 1997 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gilberto dos Santos Durval is a Catholic--so he insists with emotion. As he watched the arrival of Pope John Paul II last week, goose bumps covered his arms and tears streamed from his eyes. "He is God's messenger on Earth," said Durval, a round, jovial man whose tone shifts to hushed reverence when speaking of the pontiff.
NEWS
October 5, 1997 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gilberto dos Santos Durval is a Catholic--so he insists with emotion. As he watched the arrival of Pope John Paul II last week, goose bumps covered his arms and tears streamed from his eyes. "He is God's messenger on Earth," said Durval, a round, jovial man whose tone shifts to hushed reverence when speaking of the pontiff.
NEWS
October 12, 1991 | WILLIAM R. LONG and WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Father Edmilson Ribeiro's Catholic parish on the southern edge of Natal has six churches and a total population of more than 60,000, but Ribeiro is its only priest. His difficulty in keeping in touch with the people is all too common among priests in Brazil, which has more baptized Catholics than any other country. "The father can't give that personal attention, case by case," lamented Ribeiro, 43, a round-faced man with close-fitting cap of black hair.
NEWS
August 8, 1998 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There is a magic word that Brazilians use to describe their talent for artful compromise. The word jeito translates roughly as a knack for solving problems, whether bureaucratic entanglements or social conflicts. It applies to the melding of religions that allows tens of millions of Brazilians to call themselves Roman Catholics while practicing rites of African origin.
NEWS
March 25, 1989 | From Religious News Service
More than half a billion Scriptures were distributed around the world last year, making it the biggest yearly total since the United Bible Societies came into being 43 years ago. The total of 692,754,925 was an 11% increase above 1987 as reported by the United Bible Societies, which now has work in more than 180 countries. Figures were up for all global regions and all categories of Scripture. Bible distribution rose by 10.1%, with more than 14 million placed in circulation.
NEWS
September 23, 1995 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A greedy, corrupt and lascivious preacher in a popular miniseries on Brazilian television bears a strong resemblance to Bishop Edir Macedo, the country's most famous evangelist. Macedo's followers are furious. The miniseries has been airing weeknights on TV Globo, the network that dominates Brazilian television. Now, a smaller network, owned by Macedo's Universal Church of the Kingdom of God, is on the counterattack.
NEWS
July 6, 1993 | MAC MARGOLIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A woman in jeans and large horn-rimmed glasses brandishes a microphone and rises from the marble steps before the altar. "Who knows that Jesus loves you?" Murmurs of "Amen" ripple through the packed pews, and a thousand index fingers sprout toward heaven like a righteous forest. On cue, a matronly woman with white hair leans into her Yamaha electric piano.
NEWS
October 22, 1991 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a 10-day journey to Brazil, Pope John Paul II has raised issues and set guidelines for a major conference of Latin America's bishops next year marking the 500th anniversary of Roman Catholicism in the Western Hemisphere. More than 30 homilies, speeches and other pronouncements in Brazil spelled out the Pope's commitment to social and economic justice, while stressing spiritual needs and rejecting church alignment with political ideologies.
NEWS
September 23, 1995 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A greedy, corrupt and lascivious preacher in a popular miniseries on Brazilian television bears a strong resemblance to Bishop Edir Macedo, the country's most famous evangelist. Macedo's followers are furious. The miniseries has been airing weeknights on TV Globo, the network that dominates Brazilian television. Now, a smaller network, owned by Macedo's Universal Church of the Kingdom of God, is on the counterattack.
NEWS
July 6, 1993 | MAC MARGOLIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A woman in jeans and large horn-rimmed glasses brandishes a microphone and rises from the marble steps before the altar. "Who knows that Jesus loves you?" Murmurs of "Amen" ripple through the packed pews, and a thousand index fingers sprout toward heaven like a righteous forest. On cue, a matronly woman with white hair leans into her Yamaha electric piano.
NEWS
October 22, 1991 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a 10-day journey to Brazil, Pope John Paul II has raised issues and set guidelines for a major conference of Latin America's bishops next year marking the 500th anniversary of Roman Catholicism in the Western Hemisphere. More than 30 homilies, speeches and other pronouncements in Brazil spelled out the Pope's commitment to social and economic justice, while stressing spiritual needs and rejecting church alignment with political ideologies.
NEWS
October 12, 1991 | WILLIAM R. LONG and WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Father Edmilson Ribeiro's Catholic parish on the southern edge of Natal has six churches and a total population of more than 60,000, but Ribeiro is its only priest. His difficulty in keeping in touch with the people is all too common among priests in Brazil, which has more baptized Catholics than any other country. "The father can't give that personal attention, case by case," lamented Ribeiro, 43, a round-faced man with close-fitting cap of black hair.
NEWS
March 25, 1989 | From Religious News Service
More than half a billion Scriptures were distributed around the world last year, making it the biggest yearly total since the United Bible Societies came into being 43 years ago. The total of 692,754,925 was an 11% increase above 1987 as reported by the United Bible Societies, which now has work in more than 180 countries. Figures were up for all global regions and all categories of Scripture. Bible distribution rose by 10.1%, with more than 14 million placed in circulation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1988 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
Manoel Alves de Souza, a Rio lawyer, was a patient in a mental hospital in 1970 when he took the path of Umbanda. One of the hospital's psychiatrists encouraged him to go to an Umbanda worship center for ritual treatment of his illness, Souza recalled. In one ritual, Souza was placed within a circle of fire; in others, he was given herbal baths. Since then, he has been free of mental disturbances and is a faithful believer in Umbanda, he said in an interview. "It helped me a lot.
NEWS
October 20, 1992
In some countries, certain subjects aren't allowed on television.
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