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June 19, 1990 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The lilting voices of young men chanting prayers in Pali, the language of Buddhist scripture, drifted with hypnotic rhythm from a ramshackle schoolroom at the Temple Tuol Tompoung, another sign of Cambodia's slow climb back from the abyss. The Pali school was opened only four months ago, the first in Cambodia to teach the language since the Khmer Rouge went on a rampage in 1975 in a nearly successful effort to erase Buddhism from the national psyche.
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NEWS
June 19, 1990 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The lilting voices of young men chanting prayers in Pali, the language of Buddhist scripture, drifted with hypnotic rhythm from a ramshackle schoolroom at the Temple Tuol Tompoung, another sign of Cambodia's slow climb back from the abyss. The Pali school was opened only four months ago, the first in Cambodia to teach the language since the Khmer Rouge went on a rampage in 1975 in a nearly successful effort to erase Buddhism from the national psyche.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2012 | By Dustin Roasa
PHNOM PENH, Cambodia - Moy Da hasn't seen his sister in nearly 40 years. Like countless Cambodian families, they were separated during the reign of the Khmer Rouge. The brutal communist regime made it official policy to dismantle the nuclear family, which it considered a capitalist relic, and divided much of the population into slave labor camps. In 1975, Moy Da, then 5 years old, and his parents, who died three years later, lost track of 15-year-old Pheap when the Khmer Rouge emptied Phnom Penh and marched residents to the countryside.
NEWS
May 4, 1989 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
In an apparent breakthrough in the talks on Cambodia's political future, exiled Prince Norodom Sihanouk said Wednesday that he is now willing to return to Phnom Penh as the country's head of state, even if he must abandon his coalition allies in the ultra-left Khmer Rouge and enter into a new partnership with the current, Vietnamese-backed government. At a news conference here after two days of talks, Sihanouk said he had given the Phnom Penh government clear conditions for his participation in the regime.
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