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Religion China

NEWS
August 25, 1999 | From Associated Press
China vowed Tuesday to punish leading members of the outlawed meditation group Falun Gong, in the strongest indication yet that the group's organizers will be prosecuted. An order issued by the executive offices of the ruling Communist Party's Central Committee and the State Council, or cabinet, outlined ways government work teams pressing a crackdown against Falun Gong are to treat the group's practitioners.
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NEWS
August 4, 1999 | From Associated Press
China has put out a reward for information leading to the capture of the leader of a banned meditation sect who lives in the United States, state-run media reported Tuesday. Li Hongzhi, leader of the banned Falun Gong sect, topped a list of wanted criminals put out by Chinese police, who will begin paying rewards of more than $6,000 for tips leading to their arrest, the Beijing Evening News reported, quoting police sources. China issued an arrest warrant Thursday for Li, who lives in New York.
NEWS
July 25, 1999 | Associated Press
Chinese police rounded up more members of the banned meditation sect Falun Gong on Saturday, and the group used Web sites to report claims that protesters were attempting to converge on Beijing. However, there was little activity in Beijing by the group Saturday, as temperatures soared to 105 degrees. In the city's Beihai Park, near the Zhongnanhai compound where China's leaders live and work, about 30 Falun Gong members were surrounded and detained by police.
NEWS
July 24, 1999 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of neatly dressed, nearly silent followers of Falun Gong, the spiritual movement banned Thursday by the Chinese government, gathered across the street from the Chinese Consulate here Friday to protest Beijing's crackdown on their movement. There were no slogans, no banners and none of the chanting or stridence that routinely accompany demonstrations here.
NEWS
July 23, 1999 | HENRY CHU and ANTHONY KUHN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In an ideological campaign on a scale not seen here since the aftermath of the Tiananmen Square massacre 10 years ago, China on Thursday launched an all-out offensive against the mystical Falun Gong sect, whose followers have shocked the government with their loyalty to an exiled leader and their formidable powers of mass organization.
NEWS
April 26, 1999 | ANTHONY KUHN and MAGGIE FARLEY and HENRY CHU, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the largest demonstration in the Chinese capital since the pro-democracy protests of 1989, thousands of followers of a religious sect massed near Tiananmen Square on Sunday to demand official recognition of their beliefs, testing government tolerance of public assembly during a politically sensitive year. Devotees of the Buddhist offshoot group Falun Gong began descending on the central government compound here well before dawn.
NEWS
November 10, 1998 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the shadow of the snowcapped mountains separating China's western provinces from Tibet, monks at a scattering of Tibetan Buddhist monasteries struggle to keep their religion alive. Just as part of the daily meditation involves cultivating flowers and trees on the grounds, the monks and lamas are devoted to sowing the seeds of Buddhism in a modern world. On this arid plateau, neither is easy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1998 | Associated Press
A visit to China by American religious leaders, including a Roman Catholic archbishop, did not make progress on restoring ties between the Vatican and the Communist country, a Holy See diplomat said Thursday. "Normalization is not yet a priority" for China, said Archbishop Jean-Louis Tauran, the Vatican secretary for relations with states. "We can't speak of any concrete initiatives," said Tauran. "There is not much positive in that we haven't seen anything concrete on the table."
NEWS
March 19, 1998 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three leading American clergymen back from a three-week investigation of religious freedom in China reported guarded hope Wednesday that authorities will begin easing restrictions on worship as a result of the clerics' talks with President Jiang Zemin and other senior officials. They cited no immediate results of their February visit but stressed the unprecedented and candid nature of their discussions with the Chinese leadership.
NEWS
February 22, 1998 | From Reuters
Three U.S. religious leaders said Saturday that they are confident Chinese authorities will soon provide them with detailed information about people allegedly persecuted for their religious beliefs. The clerics, appointed by President Clinton, a week and a half ago handed their Chinese hosts a list of 30 believers reported to have been jailed in China, and asked for details of charges against the prisoners and their welfare.
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