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Religion China

NEWS
March 29, 1991 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. politicians and church leaders are gearing up to exert more pressure on China to respect religious freedom and release prisoners of conscience, two U.S. congressmen said here Thursday. Reps. Frank R. Wolf (R-Va.) and Christopher H. Smith (R-N.J.) said they met earlier in the day with Premier Li Peng and gave him a letter, signed by 110 members of Congress, calling for the release of 77 Protestant and Catholic leaders believed to be imprisoned or under house arrest.
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NEWS
November 12, 1990 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The young Uighur man glanced over his shoulder to be sure no one was listening, then spoke softly in broken English. "The Uighurs are not happy," he said. "The peasants, they got guns. They fought with the army. Many finished. The army--80 finished. The peasants--200 finished." In the dusty bazaar streets of Kashi, also known as Kashgar, Uighur hatred of Chinese authorities runs deep. Many here believe that more than 100 died fighting Chinese troops last spring in the nearby town of Baren.
NEWS
December 25, 1989 | From United Press International
Thousands of Chinese packed churches Christmas Eve to pray and sing joyful hymns once banned by the Communist nation, and church officials said their congregations have grown since last June's crackdown on the pro-democracy movement. Large crowds of worshipers and the merely curious jammed into Beijing's churches for evening Protestant services and midnight Mass at Catholic churches. Some services were so crowded that many worshipers were forced to wait outside in frigid weather.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 1989 | From Religious News Service
Bishop K. H. Ting, leader of China's officially recognized Three-Self Movement, reports that church life and work is going on "more or less as usual" in China despite the bloody government crackdown six months ago against the country's student-led democratic movement. The government has "reaffirmed its policy of religious freedom," Ting said in a recent interview conducted by a staff officer of the Amity Foundation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1989 | DAVID HOLLEY, Times Staff Writer
Splashed on the entryway of the Shilun Buddhist Temple, fragments of once-bold but now barely visible yellow characters proclaim a fading message: "Eternal Loyalty to Chairman Mao. Utter Devotion." Inside the small roadside temple, the ghosts of Mao Tse-tung and his rampaging Red Guards seem long banished. Sticks of incense and peasants' offerings of oranges are set before Guanyin, the Goddess of Mercy. Painted on the altar is a guardian beast with green scales, hoofs and the head of a lion.
NEWS
March 12, 1989 | DAVID HOLLEY, Times Staff Writer
For China, last week's pro-independence rioting and imposition of martial law in the Tibetan capital of Lhasa underscored the possibility that a deal with the exiled Dalai Lama may be the only solution to Beijing's intractable Tibet problem. For nearly 40 years, Tibetan resentment has smoldered since the Chinese assumed firm control of the region.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1989 | From Associated Press
Bishop K. H. Ting, president of the China Christian Council, says there now are about 5 million Protestants in China, six times the number there in 1949 when communists took over the government. Ting, a senior leader of the church in China, gave the figure in an interview in Bridge, a Christian bimonthly here. He says new churches are opening at the rate of about three every two days, and there now are about 5,000 of them. Estimates have put the number of Catholics at about 3 million.
NEWS
January 23, 1989 | DAVID HOLLEY, Times Staff Writer
With song and dance, horns and cymbals, political speeches and age-old pageantry, pro-Chinese Tibetans held a major ceremony here Sunday dedicated to Tibetan religious freedom plus a reaffirmation that this region must remain a part of China. The ceremony's nominal purpose was to dedicate a newly reconstructed Buddhist memorial hall at Tashilhunpo monastery here in this second-largest city of Tibet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1988 | Compiled from Times wire services
A Chinese bookstore chain recently put 10,000 Bibles on sale in its stores and sold out within a month. Peter MacInnes, manager of Amity Press, which was set up with aid from the worldwide United Bible Societies and which now prints Bibles in Nanjing, called the sales a "breakthrough," adding: "In the long term, the most efficient avenue for distributing Bibles in China is not through church agencies, but through bookstore chains."
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