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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1989 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
Standing shoulder to shoulder, the largest crowd of worshipers since Fidel Castro's Communist revolution all but silenced the Roman Catholic Church here in the early 1960s overflowed into the streets outside the Cathedral of Havana. As Cardinal Roger Etchegaray of France ended an unusual Vatican mission to Cuba with a solemn New Year's Mass, he posed a crowd-pleasing question: "What message shall I take to the Pope?" "That he come! That he come! That he come!"
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 2010 | By Keith Thursby, Los Angeles Times
Francisco Aguabella, an Afro-Cuban percussionist considered a master sacred drummer who also had a wide-ranging career in jazz and salsa, has died. He was 84. Aguabella died Friday of cancer at his Los Angeles home, said his daughter Menina Givens. His career "bears testimony to the existence and continuity of a sacred tradition in dancing and music that has been present throughout the development of popular music in the Afro-Cuban style," UC Irvine professor Raul Fernandez said in his 2006 book "From Afro-Cuban Rhythms to Latin Jazz."
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NEWS
April 5, 1993 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The music of maracas and a conga drum accompanied a young woman singing in the African language of Yoruba. Her song was a deep, staccato call to the world of spirits. Beside her, a 37-year-old fisherman rose from a red throne to dance for Chango, the warrior god of fire and thunder. The man swung a wooden ax to the beat and bobbed his shaved and painted head. The air was thick with the smell of frying goat and mutton, animals sacrificed for Chango the previous night.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1999 | MARGARET RAMIREZ and ALEX GARCIA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With impassioned chants of "Cristo Vive!"--Christ Lives!--a crowd of Cuban Protestants estimated by officials at more than 100,000 held a historic open-air celebration at Revolution Square in Havana on Sunday in the most recent sign of the Communist government's increasing tolerance of religion.
NEWS
January 18, 1998 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cuban leader Fidel Castro on Saturday called on all Cubans--"Catholics and non-Catholics, believers and nonbelievers"--to line the avenues, pack the plazas and greet Pope John Paul II this week with respect, not politics.
NEWS
January 14, 1998 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the first time in the four decades of Fidel Castro's rule, the prelate of Cuba's Roman Catholic Church delivered a 30-minute prime-time sermon on the state's tightly controlled national television Tuesday night, opening an unprecedented window on a religion long discouraged in this stridently Communist land.
NEWS
January 20, 1998 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Casting Pope John Paul II's historic trip here this week as a pastoral visit to a Cuban Catholic Church "that long has been ignored and silent," Cardinal Jaime Ortega said Monday that the papal journey "should not be reduced to an encounter between two men." In his first news conference before the pope's scheduled arrival here Wednesday, Ortega praised John Paul and Cuban President Fidel Castro as "men renowned worldwide for their leadership and charisma."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1998 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Cardinal Roger M. Mahony returned Monday from Cuba and declared that it is "almost unthinkable" that religious freedom will again be suppressed after Pope John Paul II's historic visit and that the church, not the Communist revolution, ultimately will prevail there.
NEWS
January 18, 1998 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The banner outside the Sacred Heart Church in Havana's La Vibora district proclaimed, "Without Christ, there is no true liberation," and pews inside were packed with the elderly, the infirm, the pained and the desperate. At the pulpit stood Cuba's man of the hour--the balding, cherubic cardinal who wears the mantle of a long-isolated nation's hopes, prayers and dreams.
NEWS
August 3, 1998 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The pope's portrait on the choir's T-shirts had faded, and only a few hundred families were gathered on the broad lawn of this capital's San Juan de Dios sanctuary as Cardinal Jaime Ortega mounted the pulpit. Six months to the day earlier, Pope John Paul II had electrified hundreds of thousands of Cubans in the Plaza of the Revolution with calls for freedom and hope.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1999 | Religion News Service
Evangelical Christians have been granted permission by the Communist government of Cuba to hold large rallies there in May and June. Churches will be permitted to hold local open-air gatherings of the "Cuban Evangelical Celebration" in May, the Assemblies of God news agency reported. Organizers hope one of the June rallies will be held in Havana's Revolution Square, where Pope John Paul II held his largest Mass last year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 1999 | Religion News Service
Pope John Paul II has thanked Cuban leader Fidel Castro for allowing Christmas to be celebrated as an official holiday. "I want to express to you my deep appreciation for the decision to give back to Christmas its holiday character for all Cubans, conforming to tradition," the pope said in a telegram to Castro. He also wished Castro a happy holiday. The telegram was sent to Castro on Dec. 23 but only made public by the Vatican on Monday.
NEWS
August 3, 1998 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The pope's portrait on the choir's T-shirts had faded, and only a few hundred families were gathered on the broad lawn of this capital's San Juan de Dios sanctuary as Cardinal Jaime Ortega mounted the pulpit. Six months to the day earlier, Pope John Paul II had electrified hundreds of thousands of Cubans in the Plaza of the Revolution with calls for freedom and hope.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1998 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Cardinal Roger M. Mahony returned Monday from Cuba and declared that it is "almost unthinkable" that religious freedom will again be suppressed after Pope John Paul II's historic visit and that the church, not the Communist revolution, ultimately will prevail there.
NEWS
January 26, 1998 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX and MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
For five cathartic days, Pope John Paul II took over the plazas and symbols of Fidel Castro's revolution and electrified crowds with a Christian manifesto for Cuba's transition to a freer society. In a land where, for 39 years, everything has come down to the presence of a single leader and his Communist Party, was this the start of a new era?
NEWS
January 20, 1998 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Casting Pope John Paul II's historic trip here this week as a pastoral visit to a Cuban Catholic Church "that long has been ignored and silent," Cardinal Jaime Ortega said Monday that the papal journey "should not be reduced to an encounter between two men." In his first news conference before the pope's scheduled arrival here Wednesday, Ortega praised John Paul and Cuban President Fidel Castro as "men renowned worldwide for their leadership and charisma."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1999 | MARGARET RAMIREZ and ALEX GARCIA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With impassioned chants of "Cristo Vive!"--Christ Lives!--a crowd of Cuban Protestants estimated by officials at more than 100,000 held a historic open-air celebration at Revolution Square in Havana on Sunday in the most recent sign of the Communist government's increasing tolerance of religion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 1999 | Religion News Service
Pope John Paul II has thanked Cuban leader Fidel Castro for allowing Christmas to be celebrated as an official holiday. "I want to express to you my deep appreciation for the decision to give back to Christmas its holiday character for all Cubans, conforming to tradition," the pope said in a telegram to Castro. He also wished Castro a happy holiday. The telegram was sent to Castro on Dec. 23 but only made public by the Vatican on Monday.
NEWS
January 18, 1998 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cuban leader Fidel Castro on Saturday called on all Cubans--"Catholics and non-Catholics, believers and nonbelievers"--to line the avenues, pack the plazas and greet Pope John Paul II this week with respect, not politics.
NEWS
January 18, 1998 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The banner outside the Sacred Heart Church in Havana's La Vibora district proclaimed, "Without Christ, there is no true liberation," and pews inside were packed with the elderly, the infirm, the pained and the desperate. At the pulpit stood Cuba's man of the hour--the balding, cherubic cardinal who wears the mantle of a long-isolated nation's hopes, prayers and dreams.
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