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NEWS
March 9, 1988
Fundamentalist Muslim students in Egypt attacked a group of Boy and Girl Scouts with knives, stones and bicycle chains, then opened fire on security forces as they came to the youths' aid, authorities said. About 50 students were arrested after the incident, officials said. The trouble began during a meeting and parade of the Rovers, a group roughly equivalent to the Explorers in the American Boy Scout program, at a stadium in Assyut, Egypt.
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NEWS
March 21, 2001 | MICHAEL SLACKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tensions between Egypt's Coptic Christians and its Islamic community have simmered for centuries, at times flaring into persecution and violence. Yet the two sides were in near agreement Tuesday in their anger about a visit by members of a U.S. commission investigating religious freedom worldwide. The arrival here of three members of the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom set off anti-American sentiment and charges that the West is meddling in internal Egyptian affairs.
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NEWS
August 28, 1987 | United Press International
A band of Muslim fundamentalists rampaged through the central Egyptian city of Minya on Thursday, attacking a beer truck and a video shop they suspected of dealing in pornographic films, authorities said. Authorities said 22 fundamentalists were arrested in Minya, about 125 miles south of Cairo.
NEWS
December 24, 2000 | SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By 3 p.m, the race is on. Millions of frenzied commuters pound their car horns as they creep along packed streets, vying for any open pavement they can find in this sprawling city. Even the afternoon calls to prayer booming from loudspeakers affixed to minarets are drowned out by the din. These frustrated drivers share a common goal: to get home before 4:55 p.m., the moment decreed by Islamic authorities here as sunset during the holy month of Ramadan.
NEWS
March 2, 1987
Egyptian police arrested 58 Muslim fundamentalists for setting fire to a Coptic Christian church and attacking university students in separate incidents in southern Egypt. A police spokesman said seven teen-agers were arrested in the burning of Virgin Mary Church in Sohag, 250 miles south of Cairo. The church was set ablaze after rumors circulated that a fire at a nearby mosque had been ignited by Coptic Christians.
NEWS
February 25, 2000 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX and JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Pope John Paul II, arriving here for a pilgrimage to Mt. Sinai, appealed Thursday to Egyptians to reject sectarian violence and live up to their nation's ancient ideal as a tolerant meeting ground for people of all faiths. The Roman Catholic leader and Egypt's highest Islamic authority later had a groundbreaking encounter and voiced agreement on the centrality of religion in human fulfillment. They vowed to meet again in the Vatican later this year.
NEWS
April 14, 1998 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of two Christians in the Egyptian Cabinet said Monday that he will lobby the U.S. Congress against American legislation to penalize countries that persecute religious minorities or fail to stop atrocities by members of a dominant faith. Youssef Boutros-Ghali, Egypt's economy minister and a nephew of former U.N. Secretary-General Boutros Boutros-Ghali, said the proposed U.S.
NEWS
March 21, 2001 | MICHAEL SLACKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tensions between Egypt's Coptic Christians and its Islamic community have simmered for centuries, at times flaring into persecution and violence. Yet the two sides were in near agreement Tuesday in their anger about a visit by members of a U.S. commission investigating religious freedom worldwide. The arrival here of three members of the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom set off anti-American sentiment and charges that the West is meddling in internal Egyptian affairs.
NEWS
February 4, 1990 | UPI
Muslim fundamentalists are waging a campaign of intimidation against Egyptian belly dancers, accusing them of violating the Islamic principle barring women from exposing themselves to anyone but their husbands. The campaign is part of a long-running struggle between fundamentalists, who favor a return to Islamic values, and the more secular administration of President Hosni Mubarak. "Our group is fighting vice by breaking up weddings where . . .
NEWS
May 7, 1990 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He was a tax inspector who dreamed of being a poet, a minor soldier in a formidable deployment of bureaucrats, who by day oversaw the investigations division of the Ministry of Tax Authorities and by night penned love stories and novels of intrigue. His books bore such titles as "The Man Inside a Triangle," and he published most of them himself. Sometimes, one or two copies would sell from a sidewalk display downtown.
NEWS
February 25, 2000 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX and JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Pope John Paul II, arriving here for a pilgrimage to Mt. Sinai, appealed Thursday to Egyptians to reject sectarian violence and live up to their nation's ancient ideal as a tolerant meeting ground for people of all faiths. The Roman Catholic leader and Egypt's highest Islamic authority later had a groundbreaking encounter and voiced agreement on the centrality of religion in human fulfillment. They vowed to meet again in the Vatican later this year.
NEWS
April 14, 1998 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of two Christians in the Egyptian Cabinet said Monday that he will lobby the U.S. Congress against American legislation to penalize countries that persecute religious minorities or fail to stop atrocities by members of a dominant faith. Youssef Boutros-Ghali, Egypt's economy minister and a nephew of former U.N. Secretary-General Boutros Boutros-Ghali, said the proposed U.S.
NEWS
May 7, 1990 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He was a tax inspector who dreamed of being a poet, a minor soldier in a formidable deployment of bureaucrats, who by day oversaw the investigations division of the Ministry of Tax Authorities and by night penned love stories and novels of intrigue. His books bore such titles as "The Man Inside a Triangle," and he published most of them himself. Sometimes, one or two copies would sell from a sidewalk display downtown.
NEWS
February 4, 1990 | UPI
Muslim fundamentalists are waging a campaign of intimidation against Egyptian belly dancers, accusing them of violating the Islamic principle barring women from exposing themselves to anyone but their husbands. The campaign is part of a long-running struggle between fundamentalists, who favor a return to Islamic values, and the more secular administration of President Hosni Mubarak. "Our group is fighting vice by breaking up weddings where . . .
NEWS
March 9, 1988
Fundamentalist Muslim students in Egypt attacked a group of Boy and Girl Scouts with knives, stones and bicycle chains, then opened fire on security forces as they came to the youths' aid, authorities said. About 50 students were arrested after the incident, officials said. The trouble began during a meeting and parade of the Rovers, a group roughly equivalent to the Explorers in the American Boy Scout program, at a stadium in Assyut, Egypt.
NEWS
August 28, 1987 | United Press International
A band of Muslim fundamentalists rampaged through the central Egyptian city of Minya on Thursday, attacking a beer truck and a video shop they suspected of dealing in pornographic films, authorities said. Authorities said 22 fundamentalists were arrested in Minya, about 125 miles south of Cairo.
NEWS
December 24, 2000 | SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By 3 p.m, the race is on. Millions of frenzied commuters pound their car horns as they creep along packed streets, vying for any open pavement they can find in this sprawling city. Even the afternoon calls to prayer booming from loudspeakers affixed to minarets are drowned out by the din. These frustrated drivers share a common goal: to get home before 4:55 p.m., the moment decreed by Islamic authorities here as sunset during the holy month of Ramadan.
NEWS
March 27, 1987
The leader of Egypt's Coptic Christian minority issued an appeal for improved relations between Christians and Muslims and charged that "hostile states" have been behind recent sectarian violence. The remarks by Pope Shenouda III came in the wake of violence in six Egyptian towns that cost at least one life. The patriarch said he believes that some groups are receiving funds, armament and instigation from abroad.
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