Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsReligion El Salvador
IN THE NEWS

Religion El Salvador

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 2001 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
When Salvadoran immigrants asked Immanuel Presbyterian Church to give temporary shelter to their most important religious icon, the ramifications went well beyond the walls of the Wilshire Boulevard sanctuary. The life-sized statue of the Divine Savior of the World represents the Salvadoran community's national namesake and is a symbol of unity.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 2001 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
When Salvadoran immigrants asked Immanuel Presbyterian Church to give temporary shelter to their most important religious icon, the ramifications went well beyond the walls of the Wilshire Boulevard sanctuary. The life-sized statue of the Divine Savior of the World represents the Salvadoran community's national namesake and is a symbol of unity.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 2000 | MARGARET RAMIREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Their war-torn country bears the name of the Savior, El Salvador. For the more than 700,000 Salvadorans in Southern California, the sacred image of Jesus Christ, Divine Savior of the World, standing with outstretched arms, has served as a patron saint for their country. It was he, the immigrants say, who helped them escape the bloodshed of civil war and settle in the United States.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 2000 | MARGARET RAMIREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Their war-torn country bears the name of the Savior, El Salvador. For the more than 700,000 Salvadorans in Southern California, the sacred image of Jesus Christ, Divine Savior of the World, standing with outstretched arms, has served as a patron saint for their country. It was he, the immigrants say, who helped them escape the bloodshed of civil war and settle in the United States.
NEWS
December 13, 1989 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With raids, arrests and expulsions, the Salvadoran government and its security forces have embarked on a campaign to dismantle a liberal church network that the authorities think is supporting leftist rebels. The crackdown comes in response to the largest rebel offensive in 10 years of civil war. Targets include priests, lay workers and foreign employees of humanitarian agencies, whom the government accuses of supporting revolution. The U.S.
NEWS
December 13, 1989 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With raids, arrests and expulsions, the Salvadoran government and its security forces have embarked on a campaign to dismantle a liberal church network that the authorities think is supporting leftist rebels. The crackdown comes in response to the largest rebel offensive in 10 years of civil war. Targets include priests, lay workers and foreign employees of humanitarian agencies, whom the government accuses of supporting revolution. The U.S.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|