Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsReligion Europe
IN THE NEWS

Religion Europe

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 29, 1991 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Marking the fall of Communism with an unprecedented assembly of bishops from both sides of long-divided Europe, Pope John Paul II on Thursday urged Europeans to lay aside historic differences and seek unity in a re-Christianized Continent. In his homily at an inaugural Mass for 137 bishop delegates from West and East Europe in St. Peter's Basilica, John Paul called for "an act of pardon . . .
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 20, 1997 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia's leadership ignored a chorus of denunciations from around the world Friday when the lower house of parliament adopted a law hobbling religious activity by foreign missionaries and Russian faiths that refused to curry favor with the atheist leaders of the Communist era.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 8, 1992 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a wooded, mist-covered hillside here in rural Burgundy, a controversial new European religious university is taking shape. But unlike the first European universities eight centuries ago, this new school is not the offshoot of intellectual Christian clergy. Instead of from Rome, the new European Institute of Human Sciences gets its inspiration from the Muslim holy cities of Mecca and Medina and the mosques of North Africa.
NEWS
February 8, 1992 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a wooded, mist-covered hillside here in rural Burgundy, a controversial new European religious university is taking shape. But unlike the first European universities eight centuries ago, this new school is not the offshoot of intellectual Christian clergy. Instead of from Rome, the new European Institute of Human Sciences gets its inspiration from the Muslim holy cities of Mecca and Medina and the mosques of North Africa.
NEWS
September 20, 1997 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia's leadership ignored a chorus of denunciations from around the world Friday when the lower house of parliament adopted a law hobbling religious activity by foreign missionaries and Russian faiths that refused to curry favor with the atheist leaders of the Communist era.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2000 | Associated Press
Thousands joined actress Kirstie Alley and singer Isaac Hayes in a protest against the French government attitudes toward the Los Angeles-based Church of Scientology. After the rally in the city center, the international group of protesters moved elsewhere for a day of speeches and concerts. Scientology has long had a contentious relationship with France and figures on a list of 178 groups being monitored to limit so-called cult activities.
NEWS
November 2, 1993
"The Influentials feel that Japan and the Pacific Rim countries are now marginally more important to the United States than Europe. In a wallets over hearts choice, Asia was favored by seven out of the nine groups ... For the public, however, Europe is still much more important." Q. The United States has had strong political, economic and military ties with friendly nations of Europe, on the one hand, and with Japan and the Pacific Rim nations of Asia, on the other hand.
NEWS
February 20, 1992
Historian Kathryn Norberg has been appointed director of UCLA's Center for the Study of Women. Established in 1984, the center supports and coordinates research on gender, sponsors publications and programs on issues relating to women, and addresses public policy. Norberg is an associate professor of history at UCLA whose specialties include women and gender in 17th- and 18th-Century France, and the history of women and religion in Europe.
OPINION
May 3, 2005
Re "The Spiritual Malaise That Haunts Europe," Commentary, May 1: While humane and caring individuals rejoice that the population levels of Europe are stabilizing after centuries of destructive growth, George Weigel worries about a "demographic meltdown." This is like worrying about drought in the middle of a torrential rainstorm. Incredibly, Weigel views today's prosperous, peaceful Europe as suffering from a spiritual malaise that can be cured only by a return to biblical religion.
NEWS
May 7, 2006 | Tom Hundley, Chicago Tribune
The Czech capital is cluttered with churches, from humble parish chapels to the Gothic grandeur of St. Vitus Cathedral. But the temples that symbolize the wonderment of faith are mostly empty; the only wonder to most Czechs is why anyone bothers to go. Czechs are among Europe's most secular people. According to a European Union survey published last year, 19% of Czechs said they believed in God; most of the rest said they were atheists. Only the former Soviet republic of Estonia had a lower percentage of believers.
NEWS
November 29, 1991 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Marking the fall of Communism with an unprecedented assembly of bishops from both sides of long-divided Europe, Pope John Paul II on Thursday urged Europeans to lay aside historic differences and seek unity in a re-Christianized Continent. In his homily at an inaugural Mass for 137 bishop delegates from West and East Europe in St. Peter's Basilica, John Paul called for "an act of pardon . . .
OPINION
January 12, 2005 | Stephen Prothero, Stephen Prothero teaches at Boston University and is author of "American Jesus: How the Son of God Became a National Icon" (Farrar, Strauss and Giroux, 2003).
The sociologist Peter Berger once remarked that if India is the most religious country in the world and Sweden the least, then the United States is a nation of Indians ruled by Swedes. Not anymore. With a Jesus lover in the Oval Office and a faith-based party in control of both houses of Congress, the United States is undeniably a nation of believers ruled by the same. Things are different in Europe, and not just in Sweden.
SPORTS
July 30, 1994 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The blow knocked Pau Coll down. He was dizzy. He was in pain. He was in heaven. Coll had played soccer all his life, understandable because he had grown up in Spain. But then he got a chance to go to another part of the world, and his own world was never the same. Coll went to the United States for one year of high school as an exchange student, winding up in Texas near Amarillo. Much as soccer is the closest thing to religion in Europe, such is the case with football in Texas.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|