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NEWS
February 18, 1997 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright on Monday called the U.S.-German differences over the treatment of Scientologists "clearly a subject for bilateral discussion" but downplayed the issue in talks with German leaders and termed members' claims that they suffer from Nazi-style persecution "distasteful." U.S.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1999 | Religion News Service
Pope John Paul II has called on Germany's Roman Catholic bishops to speak out for the church and its values in an increasingly godless society. "A lay society in which there is ever more silence about God needs your voice," the pope told a group of German bishops making the visit to the Vatican required of all Catholic prelates every five years. "The Berlin Wall has fallen. Barbed wire has been replaced by the open door.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1999 | Religion News Service
Pope John Paul II has called on Germany's Roman Catholic bishops to speak out for the church and its values in an increasingly godless society. "A lay society in which there is ever more silence about God needs your voice," the pope told a group of German bishops making the visit to the Vatican required of all Catholic prelates every five years. "The Berlin Wall has fallen. Barbed wire has been replaced by the open door.
NEWS
November 13, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Foreign Minister Klaus Kinkel unveiled plans for an "information campaign" in the U.S. to explain Germany's refusal to accept Scientology as a religion. Bonn argues that the Los Angeles-based Church of Scientology is--in Germany, at least--more of a business concern than a religion, and accuses it of exploiting the insecurities of its members for economic gain. Kinkel said that although the U.S.
NEWS
June 22, 1996 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pope John Paul II on Friday began a 2 1/2-day visit to Germany, a country where membership in the Roman Catholic Church is in steep decline and opinion polls show that the Vatican's strictures on contraception and priestly celibacy are at least partly to blame. Theologians and lay Catholic activists plan to use the pope's visit to Germany--the engine of the Protestant Reformation--as a chance to press for change.
NEWS
January 28, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
The Christian Social Union, Chancellor Helmut Kohl's Bavarian-based coalition partner, accused the U.S. State Department of falling for a Church of Scientology hate campaign against Germany. CSU General Secretary Bernd Protzner urged Foreign Minister Klaus Kinkel to intervene to head off criticism of Germany that the State Department has been reported to be planning over Bonn's restrictions on the controversial group.
NEWS
December 26, 1996 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Inside and out, St. Willibrord's looks every brick and candle the ordinary neighborhood Roman Catholic church. On a sunny Sunday morning, little knots of parishioners in wool suits and Bavarian hats gather outside in the old churchyard, then move indoors, crossing themselves with holy water at an old stone font and genuflecting at pew side.
NEWS
February 6, 1997 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH and JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
On one thing, at least, the Church of Scientology and German authorities agree: The issue is tyranny. They disagree, however, on just who the tyrant is. German officials say the Los Angeles-based church "aims at world domination and the destruction of our society," in the words of Family Affairs Minister Claudia Nolte.
NEWS
November 13, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Foreign Minister Klaus Kinkel unveiled plans for an "information campaign" in the U.S. to explain Germany's refusal to accept Scientology as a religion. Bonn argues that the Los Angeles-based Church of Scientology is--in Germany, at least--more of a business concern than a religion, and accuses it of exploiting the insecurities of its members for economic gain. Kinkel said that although the U.S.
NEWS
December 20, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a development signaling that Germany is beginning to flex the political muscle that came with unification 15 months ago, Chancellor Helmut Kohl's Cabinet on Thursday became the first major Western government to formally recognize the breakaway Yugoslav republics of Croatia and Slovenia. That decision, which came at an evening Cabinet meeting, is part of an agreement worked out among European Community foreign ministers earlier in the week.
NEWS
February 18, 1997 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright on Monday called the U.S.-German differences over the treatment of Scientologists "clearly a subject for bilateral discussion" but downplayed the issue in talks with German leaders and termed members' claims that they suffer from Nazi-style persecution "distasteful." U.S.
NEWS
February 6, 1997 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH and JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
On one thing, at least, the Church of Scientology and German authorities agree: The issue is tyranny. They disagree, however, on just who the tyrant is. German officials say the Los Angeles-based church "aims at world domination and the destruction of our society," in the words of Family Affairs Minister Claudia Nolte.
NEWS
January 28, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
The Christian Social Union, Chancellor Helmut Kohl's Bavarian-based coalition partner, accused the U.S. State Department of falling for a Church of Scientology hate campaign against Germany. CSU General Secretary Bernd Protzner urged Foreign Minister Klaus Kinkel to intervene to head off criticism of Germany that the State Department has been reported to be planning over Bonn's restrictions on the controversial group.
NEWS
December 26, 1996 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Inside and out, St. Willibrord's looks every brick and candle the ordinary neighborhood Roman Catholic church. On a sunny Sunday morning, little knots of parishioners in wool suits and Bavarian hats gather outside in the old churchyard, then move indoors, crossing themselves with holy water at an old stone font and genuflecting at pew side.
NEWS
June 22, 1996 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pope John Paul II on Friday began a 2 1/2-day visit to Germany, a country where membership in the Roman Catholic Church is in steep decline and opinion polls show that the Vatican's strictures on contraception and priestly celibacy are at least partly to blame. Theologians and lay Catholic activists plan to use the pope's visit to Germany--the engine of the Protestant Reformation--as a chance to press for change.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1998 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
The Getty Center offers Angeltown a rare look at the finest 19th century German art. "Fuseli to Menzel: Drawings and Watercolors in the Age of Goethe" presents 80 works by 47 artists who were the epoch's superstars. The compendium announces itself as a class act. Works come predominantly from the collection of Alfred Winterstein, who ranks among the most perceptive and discriminating of modern German connoisseurs. Before roosting in L.A.'
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 1997 | NINA SHEA, Nina Shea is the author of "In the Lion's Den," a new book on anti-Christian persecution, and is director of the Washington-based religious freedom program of Freedom House, a human rights group
The great publicity that has come with Hollywood's crusade for Scientologists facing discrimination in Germany has proved the film industry's astonishing influence. Recently Dustin Hoffman, Goldie Hawn, Oliver Stone and 30 other celebrities placed open letters in European newspapers with scorching denunciations of Germany's exclusion of Scientologists from government jobs and a boycott of Scientologist Tom Cruise's movie, "Mission Impossible."
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