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Religion Guatemala

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December 24, 1992 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The millions of Mayas that make their home today in the highlands of Guatemala constitute perhaps the most distinct and vibrant culture in Latin America today. Many of the Mayas continue to speak their own language, make and wear traditional clothing and take part in ceremonies and rituals that have roots in the days before the Spanish arrived. That culture is rapidly coming to an end, however, under an array of pressures from religious to political.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 1999 | MARGARET RAMIREZ, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
With incense burning and an immense statue of their Lord leading the solemn procession, more than 2,000 devout Maya and other indigenous people gathered in the Pico-Union district Friday night to celebrate the feast of the patron saint of Guatemala--Nuestro Senor de Esquipulas, the Lord of Esquipulas. Ebony arms outstretched on the crucifix and bloodied head ringed with thorns, his dark-skinned face is the essence of centuries of Maya suffering. He is the Cristo Negro, the Black Christ.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 1999 | MARGARET RAMIREZ, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
With incense burning and an immense statue of their Lord leading the solemn procession, more than 2,000 devout Maya and other indigenous people gathered in the Pico-Union district Friday night to celebrate the feast of the patron saint of Guatemala--Nuestro Senor de Esquipulas, the Lord of Esquipulas. Ebony arms outstretched on the crucifix and bloodied head ringed with thorns, his dark-skinned face is the essence of centuries of Maya suffering. He is the Cristo Negro, the Black Christ.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 1992 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The millions of Mayas that make their home today in the highlands of Guatemala constitute perhaps the most distinct and vibrant culture in Latin America today. Many of the Mayas continue to speak their own language, make and wear traditional clothing and take part in ceremonies and rituals that have roots in the days before the Spanish arrived. That culture is rapidly coming to an end, however, under an array of pressures from religious to political.
NEWS
May 13, 1990 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Here in western Guatemala, where the eternal battle of land and wind has left the mountains a defeated jumble of rocks and ravines, another conflict, between people, is littering the countryside with the spiritual, social and political wreckage of a religious war. It is a war of Christian against Christian, and it is transforming nearly every aspect of life--not only in Guatemala, where the battle has gone on the longest and is the most intense, but elsewhere in Central America.
NEWS
February 5, 1996 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For more than four centuries, this Indian village, like almost any from the Peruvian Andes to the Mexican Sierra, had just one place of worship: the Roman Catholic church on the square. But now it has 18 churches--and 17 are Protestant. Inside the three-story Calvary Church, which now dominates the square, Mariano Riscaoche and Roque Yac told the story of the spiritual quest that changed their lives and their village.
NEWS
May 13, 1990 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Here in western Guatemala, where the eternal battle of land and wind has left the mountains a defeated jumble of rocks and ravines, another conflict, between people, is littering the countryside with the spiritual, social and political wreckage of a religious war. It is a war of Christian against Christian, and it is transforming nearly every aspect of life--not only in Guatemala, where the battle has gone on the longest and is the most intense, but elsewhere in Central America.
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