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October 11, 1989 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pope John Paul II called on local Roman Catholic priests Tuesday to show courage in adversity, and he told leaders of the Muslim majority in Indonesia that religious freedom is a fundamental human right. The Pope's remarks underlined the sensitive position of Christian churches in the world's most populous Muslim nation. But Vatican sources said he intended them in a global sense.
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NEWS
March 13, 2001 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With her home destroyed and her church burned to the ground, 14-year-old Marina Rumakur knew there was only one way to survive: Convert to Islam and submit to a painful rite of mutilation. Trapped by Muslim extremists on the tiny Indonesian island of Kesui, she and more than 900 fellow Christians surrendered.
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NEWS
January 2, 2000 |
Dozens of houses and a mosque were set ablaze Saturday as Christians and Muslims clashed in Indonesia's Spice Islands, leaving 14 people dead and three others missing, officials said. The clash occurred in Masohi, a small town on the island of Ceram, said Malik Selang, an administrator at Al Fatah Hospital in Ambon, capital of Maluku province. Nine Muslims were killed, he said.
NEWS
December 27, 2000 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dewi Abriyani, a willowy 16-year-old with deep brown eyes, is a vision in flowing white when she sets off each morning for high school. Her floor-length robe is pristine and starched. So is a large head cover that fits snugly around her face and falls almost to her waist. "I wear Islamic dress not only because of religious obligation," explained the young Indonesian, referring to a 7th century dictate from the Koran. "It also makes me feel more comfortable, more beautiful.
NEWS
January 28, 2000 | Associated Press
Fresh fighting between Christians and Muslims in eastern Indonesia has killed 65 people in the last three days, the region's military commander said Thursday. Brig. Gen. Max Tamaela said the clashes occurred on Bacan, 1,600 miles northeast of Jakarta. Thirty-five of the victims died Wednesday in fighting between residents of Mafa and Songa, two small villages on the remote island, he said. The other 30 died Monday and Tuesday.
NEWS
January 25, 2000 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The predawn attack, Hengky Tahya recalled Monday from his hospital bed, came from three directions--the sea, the road and the jungled hill above his Christian village. It lasted seven hours, and he estimated that it involved about 1,000 men, some dressed in the white robes of Muslim warriors. "We were no match for them," said Tahya, who was lucky to escape with a bullet wound in his shoulder. "We had swords and homemade guns. They had automatic weapons.
NEWS
December 27, 2000 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dewi Abriyani, a willowy 16-year-old with deep brown eyes, is a vision in flowing white when she sets off each morning for high school. Her floor-length robe is pristine and starched. So is a large head cover that fits snugly around her face and falls almost to her waist. "I wear Islamic dress not only because of religious obligation," explained the young Indonesian, referring to a 7th century dictate from the Koran. "It also makes me feel more comfortable, more beautiful.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1999 | Religion News Service
Villagers and police in Indonesia said this week that rioters burned down one of Southeast Asia's oldest churches in the recent wave of violent clashes between Muslims and Christians. Constructed in 1780 by Roman Catholic Portuguese colonizers, the Gereja Tua, or Old Church, was on Ambon Island, in the province of Maluku, 1,400 miles northeast of Jakarta. A Catholic priest was among at least eight people killed in the religious riot that erupted Jan. 21 in the twin villages of Hila-Kaitetu.
NEWS
October 14, 1989
Pope John Paul II celebrated the final Mass of his Indonesian tour and urged Roman Catholics to be bold in proclaiming Christian values in the predominantly Muslim nation. His last Mass was attended by 100,000 people in northern Sumatra. In a speech to the country's 42 bishops later in Jakarta, the pontiff acknowledged "occasional difficulties" facing his 5 million-member flock but reminded them that religious freedom is protected by Indonesia's constitution.
NEWS
March 13, 2001 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With her home destroyed and her church burned to the ground, 14-year-old Marina Rumakur knew there was only one way to survive: Convert to Islam and submit to a painful rite of mutilation. Trapped by Muslim extremists on the tiny Indonesian island of Kesui, she and more than 900 fellow Christians surrendered.
NEWS
June 24, 2000 | From Associated Press
New street battles Friday between Christians and Muslims left at least 18 people dead, and Indonesia's president blamed paid provocateurs for whipping up religious hatred in the riot-torn Molucca Islands. President Abdurrahman Wahid called for a ban on travel to the Moluccas after Islamic vigilantes from other parts of Indonesia joined in this week's sectarian violence. In the provincial capital, Ambon, mobs exchanged gunfire and fought with swords and spears.
NEWS
January 28, 2000 | Associated Press
Fresh fighting between Christians and Muslims in eastern Indonesia has killed 65 people in the last three days, the region's military commander said Thursday. Brig. Gen. Max Tamaela said the clashes occurred on Bacan, 1,600 miles northeast of Jakarta. Thirty-five of the victims died Wednesday in fighting between residents of Mafa and Songa, two small villages on the remote island, he said. The other 30 died Monday and Tuesday.
NEWS
January 25, 2000 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The predawn attack, Hengky Tahya recalled Monday from his hospital bed, came from three directions--the sea, the road and the jungled hill above his Christian village. It lasted seven hours, and he estimated that it involved about 1,000 men, some dressed in the white robes of Muslim warriors. "We were no match for them," said Tahya, who was lucky to escape with a bullet wound in his shoulder. "We had swords and homemade guns. They had automatic weapons.
NEWS
January 21, 2000 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Calm returned to the tourist island of Lombok on Thursday as the United States offered fresh assurances that it stands behind the government of President Abdurrahman Wahid and considers a stable Indonesia essential to the well-being of Southeast Asia. Lombok, just 20 miles east of the popular resort island of Bali, was rocked by three days of violence this week that left five people dead as Muslim attackers targeted Christian homes and churches.
NEWS
January 2, 2000 |
Dozens of houses and a mosque were set ablaze Saturday as Christians and Muslims clashed in Indonesia's Spice Islands, leaving 14 people dead and three others missing, officials said. The clash occurred in Masohi, a small town on the island of Ceram, said Malik Selang, an administrator at Al Fatah Hospital in Ambon, capital of Maluku province. Nine Muslims were killed, he said.
NEWS
December 29, 1999 | Reuters
The Indonesian military urged the government today to declare a civil emergency in the eastern island of Ambon, where religious clashes that have killed at least 55 people entered their fourth day. The clashes, which started Sunday after rumors that a Muslim youth had been run over by a Christian, continued overnight with angry mobs torching several buildings, a military spokesman said. "Fighting is still continuing," Lt. Col.
NEWS
December 29, 1999 | Reuters
The Indonesian military urged the government today to declare a civil emergency in the eastern island of Ambon, where religious clashes that have killed at least 55 people entered their fourth day. The clashes, which started Sunday after rumors that a Muslim youth had been run over by a Christian, continued overnight with angry mobs torching several buildings, a military spokesman said. "Fighting is still continuing," Lt. Col.
NEWS
January 21, 2000 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Calm returned to the tourist island of Lombok on Thursday as the United States offered fresh assurances that it stands behind the government of President Abdurrahman Wahid and considers a stable Indonesia essential to the well-being of Southeast Asia. Lombok, just 20 miles east of the popular resort island of Bali, was rocked by three days of violence this week that left five people dead as Muslim attackers targeted Christian homes and churches.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1999 | Religion News Service
Villagers and police in Indonesia said this week that rioters burned down one of Southeast Asia's oldest churches in the recent wave of violent clashes between Muslims and Christians. Constructed in 1780 by Roman Catholic Portuguese colonizers, the Gereja Tua, or Old Church, was on Ambon Island, in the province of Maluku, 1,400 miles northeast of Jakarta. A Catholic priest was among at least eight people killed in the religious riot that erupted Jan. 21 in the twin villages of Hila-Kaitetu.
NEWS
May 23, 1998 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They came to Al Azhar Mosque by the thousands Friday, the day of Muslim prayer, and when the building filled, they spilled onto the lawn and into the parking lot, spreading rugs and newspapers on the ground and kneeling in prayer. This day, like many here, was furnace hot and dripping with humidity, and some in the throng moved closer to the spreading banyans and towering palms, seeking shade.
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