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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1992 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An outspoken San Pedro pastor who has rankled the Presbyterian Church in the past says he has been removed from his temporary post because he used a memorial service for an AIDS victim to call on homosexuals to repent. The Rev. Roland Hughes, 64, who has headed First Presbyterian Church of San Pedro for two years, said he made the comments only after friends of the deceased man referred to his gay activism in their testimonials.
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NEWS
January 5, 1992 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The San Fernando Valley, long regarded by pastors as a daunting expanse of unchurched suburbia, indeed has relatively few residents involved in organized religion, a Los Angeles Times Poll has found. Nearly eight of 10 Valley adults identify with some religion, but only half that many belong to a congregation and just one-third attended religious services in the previous week.
NEWS
January 5, 1992 | JOHN DART, The following interviews were conducted with respondents to the recent Times Poll on religion in the San Fernando Valley. The follow-up interviews were conducted by staff writer John Dart
Anne Reinders, 35, of Granada Hills goes with her husband to The Church on the Way in Van Nuys at least twice a week despite her parents' lingering misgivings about a church that holds Pentecostal beliefs in healing, casting out demons and the prayer-like speaking in unintelligible tongues.
NEWS
January 5, 1992 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On an issue that has agonized mainline denominations and outraged religious traditionalists, a majority of San Fernando Valley residents say it is wrong to keep homosexuals out of the clergy. In the most surprising finding of a mid-December survey of 1,237 adults, a Los Angeles Times Poll showed that 62% said it is wrong to exclude gays and lesbians from the pulpit while 24% think it is right.
NEWS
January 5, 1992 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Are religious feelings associated with greater happiness? Not necessarily, according to The Times Poll. A San Fernando Valley survey found that most people voiced satisfaction with their lives and communities regardless of the importance of religion to them. Among those who say religion is important to them, about four-fifths, 82%, say they are generally happy with their lives, and 15% are dissatisfied. The proportions are about the same among those who say religion is not important, 76% to 21%.
NEWS
January 5, 1992
Catholic bishops have worried in recent years about aggressive proselytizing of Latino Catholics by sectarian churches, but a Times Poll of the San Fernando Valley indicates that defections by Anglo Catholics may be taking a greater toll. Of Latinos in the Valley who were reared as Catholics, three-quarters are still Catholic. Among Anglos who grew up Catholic, only 60% remain with that church.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1991 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As her neighbors in Downey are popping champagne corks to celebrate New Year's Eve tonight, Angelic Zaferis will be popping loaves of bread into the oven. She won't be cooking any last-minute hors d'oeuvres, though. It will be special bread made from flour, eggs, imported gum--and 25-cent pieces. Zaferis will be preparing a special Greek bread called vasilopita that Greek-Americans eat each Jan. 1 to start off the new year on the right foot.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1991 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You could call Andrew Kazazian the luckiest kid around. That's because Santa Claus will visit the 4-year-old Glendale boy twice this holiday season. He'll come the first time on Dec. 25. Then he'll come back on Jan. 6. Like thousands of others living in the Los Angeles area, Andrew will celebrate Christmas two times--first on the traditional American day and later on the traditional Armenian day. For centuries, Armenians have observed Christmas on Jan.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1990 | RUSSELL CHANDLER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Residents of Los Angeles County are much less likely to attend a church or to read the Bible than are residents of the nation as a whole, according to a new survey to be made public next month. But blacks who live in the county are far more likely to be involved in religious activities than are whites and Latinos. In a given week, only 35% of Los Angeles adults will attend church, compared to the national norm of 44%, the Barna Research Group in Glendale found.
NEWS
September 6, 1990 | ITABARI NJERI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sophia and Jamillah Ma steal a minute to sit with a visitor at an out-of-the-way table in the China Islamic restaurant their family owns in Rosemead. They help run the business with four other siblings and in-laws. It is a bright, bustling place with a communal spirit and " halal --in English that means Kosher--food," says Jamillah Ma, her head covered with the hijab , or scarf, that many Muslim women wear.
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